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#john dos passos
macrolit · 2 days ago
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A novel is a commodity that fulfills a certain need; people need to buy daydreams like they need to buy ice cream or aspirin or gin.
John Dos Passos, b. 14 January 1896
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davidhudson · 2 days ago
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John Dos Passos, January 14, 1896 – September 28, 1970.
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writerswritecompany · 2 months ago
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Quotable – John Dos Passos
Find out more about the author here
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uwmspeccoll · 3 months ago
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Milestone Monday, Part 2
On this date, October 4, the long-distance passenger train service Orient Express made its first run in 1883. To commemorate this milestone, we present illustrations from the first edition of American author John Dos Passos’s travel memoir Orient Express, published in New York by Harper & Brothers in 1927, with eight illustrations based on original paintings by the author.
In the second half of 1921, Dos Passos left his friend the poet E. E. Cummings in Paris to take the Orient Express bound for the Middle East, with its terminus at the time in Istanbul. From Turkey he ventured to the Balkans, then from Georgia and Armenia went down to Persia and Iraq, and from its capital, Baghdad, he took thirty-nine days to travel the desert that extends to Damascus in a large camel caravan of which he was the only western passenger. His travels extended as far as Morocco. That experience, possibly among the most intense of the writer's life, was collected in different newspapers and magazines, until it was finally published in its entirety in this 1927 publication. 
All the while, he documented his travels in paintings. He had always drawn and painted, but took some formal lessons after his return from the Middle East. Although he participated in exhibitions and continued to paint and illustrate for the rest of his life, he was not recognized as a major artist, but his body of work was well respected, and he developed a distinctive style that shows influences from Post-Impressionism, Expressionism, and Cubism. The paintings from top to bottom are:
1.) Frontispiece: Chleuh 2.) Teheran: The Bath of the Lion 3.) Mogador 4.) Traintime: Beni Ounif 5.) Teahouse: Teheran 6.) Trebizond 7.) The Golden Horn 8.) Baghdad: The Bazaars That Burned
View our other Milestone Monday posts.
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gregorygalloway · 2 days ago
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John Dos Passos (14 January 1896 – 28 September 1970) 
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anatomy-lesson · 4 months ago
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“Fifteen minutes for lunch, three minutes to go to the toilet, the Taylorized speed up everywhere, reachunder, adjustwasher, screwdown bolt, shove in cotterpin, reachunder, adjustwasher, screwdown bolt, reachunderadjustscrewdownreachunderadjust, until every ounce of life was sucked off into production and at night the workmen went home gray shaking husks.” - John Dos Passos, The Big Money, 1936 p. 75.
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jeffalessandrelli · 9 months ago
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It’s commonplace to call Woolf an impressionist in this peculiar sense, and yet it nails her novelistic craft. She is an inhabitant of minds. And the mind, in “Mrs. Dalloway” and later, in a more extreme sense, in “The Waves” (1931), is a kind of nebulous antenna tuning in and out of life’s frequencies, ever enveloped in its luminous halo. As the critic J. Hillis Miller once put it, the reader most often finds that she is “plunged within an individual mind which is being understood from inside by an ubiquitous, all-knowing mind.”
This is evident to us not from the novel’s immortal opening line — “Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself” — but from the one immediately following, which serves as a kind of mirror to the first, tipping us off that we must reread it as something other than objective assertion: “For Lucy had her work cut out for her.” Suddenly, with the lightly colloquial “cut out for her,” we are in the mind not of an omniscient narrator but of a character — Clarissa Dalloway, as the succeeding lines make clear. The reader ceases to think that she is being told what Mrs. Dalloway said about getting the flowers, and begins to think instead that Mrs. Dalloway is just remarking on that fact, as if to herself. And that changes everything.
This narrative technique, known as free-indirect speech, was part of Woolf’s quiet revolution. Though she did not invent it — arguably Austen, Flaubert and Edith Wharton got there first — Woolf perfected this mode, coloring it with the anxiety of modern subjectivity. Open any novel of the past 50 years, and you will find the narrator reporting thoughts that, for reasons of diction and tense, can only be those of a character. With varying degrees of indebtedness, each of these is an heir to Woolf and her narrators, who enter the world of their fictions as Clarissa Dalloway enters the world of her relations, “being laid out like a mist between the people she knew best.” That a narrator need not fiddle with chess pieces from on high but might linger like a cloud among foggy minds is a feature of modernism that has, as it were, contaminated literature ever since.
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discotec · 3 months ago
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caricatures of John Dos Passos and F. Scott Fitzgerald by Gene Markey for a book of caricatures called “Literary Lights” (1923)
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motschoisis · 4 months ago
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“Hell, for God's sake, is a hell of a stimulus.”
— John Dos Passos, Trois Soldats, 2018.
(Traduit par René-Noël Raimbault)
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justforbooks · a year ago
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John Dos Passos’s trilogy U.S.A. — comprising The 42nd Parallel (1930), 1919 (1932), and The Big Money (1936) — stands today like an unvisited historical monument in the annals of American literature, a Grant’s Tomb of the bookshelf. Despite its acceptance as a classic, and its being ranked twenty-third on the Modern Library list of the 100 best English-language novels of the twentieth century, it seems to be little read today. Yet when we open it again at the end of the second decade of the twenty-first, Dos Passos’s innovative, panoramic documentary of America’s emergence from its nineteenth-century cocoon onto the world stage during and after World War I is as timely a piece of fiction as one could imagine encountering in the echo chamber of our contemporary political discourse.
The author’s reputation preceding him (Gore Vidal once wrote, “Of all the recorders of what happened last summer — or last decade — John Dos Passos is the most dogged”), I was expecting an out-modishness barely tolerable when I reread it myself in 2016. What I found instead was an extraordinary fidelity to the faults at the core of our national identity, then and now. Immigrants of different nationalities are greeted with an all-too-familiar fear and aggression (“those damn lousy furreners”), and the realization of the gulf between the haves and the have-nots — be the having economic means, political power, or constabulary force — is similarly recognizable: “all right we are two nations” we read as The Big Money approaches its conclusion in the turmoil surrounding the trial and execution of Sacco and Vanzetti.
Through it all, we witness the author’s keen eye for the headlines, news flashes, and song lyrics that shaped the public mind in the first flush of mass media (how prescient Dos Passos was in his understanding of both its stimulating and stupefying effects). So if the trilogy is at times dated in expression, it is alive with a kind of scriptural foreshadowing, intuitive in its understanding of our enduring national character and the conflicts at the heart of it — between capitalism and the commonweal, finance and labor, the individual and the community, the familiar and the strange, the little guy and the big guy, us and them. In other words, the same impulses driving our current sense of crisis.
“all right we are two nations”
Dos Passos’s formal ambitions — the works are not conventional novels, but rather collages of voices, found language, stream-of-consciousness descriptions, “newsreels,” set pieces offering capsule biographies of inventors and thinkers such as Thomas Edison, the Wright Brothers, Thorstein Veblen, and Charles Steinmetz, and running narratives following the development of a handful of characters — were bold at the time of writing and remain striking today. As Alfred Kazin astutely wrote of the first book in the series:
What Dos Passos created with The 42nd Parallel was in fact another American invention — an American thing peculiar to the opportunity and stress of American life, like the Wright Brothers’ airplane, Edison’s phonograph, Luther Burbank’s hybrids, Thorstein Veblen’s social analysis, Frank Lloyd Wright’s first office buildings. (All these fellow inventors are celebrated in U.S.A.) The 42nd Parallel is an artwork. But we soon recognize that Dos Passos’ contraption, his new kind of novel, is in fact … the greatest character in the book itself.
U.S.A. is like a vast history painting, a montage of carefully constructed panels juxtaposed to create a composite “voice” more vivid, more resourceful, more impersonal, and more capacious than that heard in ordinary literary composition. He wanted to find a wavelength strong enough to broadcast the speech of the people entire, with all its messy and often anguished noise. Kazin again:
The artistic aim of his book, one may say, is to represent the litany, the tone, the issue of the time in the voice of the time, the banality, the cliché that finally brings home to us the voice in the crowd: the voice of mass opinion. The voice that might be anyone’s voice brings home to us, as only so powerful a reduction of the many to the one ever can, the vibrating resemblances that make history.
If you read Dos Passos’s dispatches from eight decades ago in tandem with news reports from any recent week, you’ll see how long those vibrating resemblances last. If U.S.A. has been out of fashion, it might be time for it to come back in: it’s like a reading of the entrails of American modernity, an ominous prophecy that is wise to the collective nature of the democratic enterprise, and therefore alert to the desperate disillusion which can threaten that enterprise when our sense of all-being-in-this-together is more real as phantom than as fact — when we embrace too blindly a destiny not manifest but makeshift, afraid of the riskiness inherent in the freedom it purports to espouse.
Daily inspiration. Discover more photos at http://justforbooks.tumblr.com
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delux2222 · a year ago
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“I never see the dawn that I don't say to myself perhaps.”
Happy Birthday, John dos Passos (1896-1970)
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macrolit · 2 days ago
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If there is a special Hell for writers it would be in the forced contemplation of their own works.
John Dos Passos, b. 14 January 1896
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thepopculturearchivist · a year ago
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September 28, 1970
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micaheugenesatchmore · 6 months ago
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'It's not even in the dictionary.'
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gregorygalloway · a year ago
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John Dos Passos (14 January 1896 – 28 September 1970) 
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erick-saqui · 10 months ago
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¿ Y de qué sirve triunfar en un mundo que no vale la pena de ser tenido en cuenta?
John Dos Passos, Tres soldados.
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andrea-c-soncini-fantasy · 11 months ago
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Stephen King: Carrie
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justforbooks · a year ago
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AIRWAYS, INC., 1928
His second play, Airways, Inc., was a failure—running only four weeks. Dos Passos invested almost a thousand dollars in the production to keep it alive. The play, set against a factory backdrop, concerns a labor organizer who is framed for murder and executed. After Airways, Inc., Dos Passos quits the New Playwrights Theatre and all but ends his career as a playwright.
Daily inspiration. Discover more photos at http://justforbooks.tumblr.com
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calloftheancestors · a year ago
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“Every generation rewrites the past. In easy times history is more or less of an ornamental art, but in times of danger we are driven to the written record by a pressing need to find answers to the riddles of today.
We need to know what kind of firm ground other men, belonging to generations before us, have found to stand on. In spite of changing conditions of life they were not very different from ourselves, their thoughts were the grandfathers of our thoughts, they managed to meet situations as difficult as those we have to face, to meet them sometimes lightheartedly, and in some measure to make their hopes prevail. We need to know how they did it.
In times of change and danger when there is a quicksand of fear under men’s reasoning, a sense of continuity with generations gone before can stretch like a lifeline across the scary present and get us past that idiot delusion of the exceptional Now that blocks good thinking.
That is why, in times like ours, when old institutions are caving in and being replaced by new institutions not necessarily in accord with most men’s preconceived hopes, political thought has to look backwards as well as forwards.”
—John Dos Passos, The Use of the Past: The Ground we Stand On, 1941
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