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infinitemarilynmonroe · a day ago
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Marilyn Monroe entertaining the troops in Korea, 1954.
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twixnmix · 2 days ago
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Marilyn Monroe performing for American troops in Korea, February 1954.
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federer7 · 2 days ago
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Sogong-dong, Seoul, Korea 1956-1963
Photo by Han Youngsoo
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koreanaswego · 2 days ago
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Korean Word of the Day
술휘
Tipsy
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jamesusilljournal · an hour ago
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SilllDa
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venus-academia · 20 days ago
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soft summer aesthetic
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richardarmitagefanpage · a year ago
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nansheonearth · 4 months ago
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"According to recent analysis from News1, sales of cosmetics, hair products and other beauty-related apparel by Korean women in their 20s has dramatically declined between 2015/2016 and 2017/2018.
Plastic surgery — another common playground for young South Koreans — has declined by 64.4 billion won."
Cosmetic sales have gone down by 53.5 billion Korean won in that period.
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Escape the corset
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boobliz · 4 months ago
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this is a state of grace
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asunnydisposish · 10 months ago
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Sohn Kee-chung & Nam Sung-yong
Now that  the Tokyo Olympics is underway, let's talk about Olympic medalists Sohn Kee-chung (손기정) and Nam Sung-yong (남승룡) - who were forced to compete under the Japanese flag during the 1936 Olympics. 
As you may know, Japan was an imperial power during WWII and colonized Korea (as well as many other countries). Sohn Kee-chung and Nam Sung-yong were ethnic Koreans who were forced to change their names to Son Kitei and Nan Shoryu so they could compete as "Japanese" athletes.
Sohn won the gold in the marathon and Nam won bronze, but as you can tell from the awards ceremony photos, neither were happy about their victory as they had to stand in front of the world not as Koreans but as Japanese subjects.
Sohn specifically used the laurel plant he received as gold medalist to hide the Japanese flag on his chest. Nam recalled being jealous of Sohn - not because he won gold - but because he had something to cover the flag with. You can see Nam clenching his fist in photos instead.
Sohn was forced to give a victory speech that was pre-written for him praising the Japanese Empire. You can listen to a record here. Around the 2:39 mark - you can hear a voice threatening Sohn: "Louder. Read louder."
Unable to celebrate his win, Sohn sent a postcard to a friend post-match that simply read: "I am sad."
Korean newspapers Dong-A Ilbo (동아일보) and Joseon Joong-Ang Ilbo (조선중앙일보) edited out the Japanese flag when reporting on Sohn and Nam's wins. The Japanese government responded by arresting Korean journalists and putting Sohn under surveillance.
Both Sohn and Nam have repeatedly asked to be remembered as Korean athletes, not Japanese ones. But to this day, official Olympics records still use Japanese names and the Japanese flag for them.
In fact, the JOC has been introducing Sohn and 8 other Koreans as "Japanese" athletes in order to promote Tokyo 2020. These athletes competed under the Japanese flag not by choice, but by imperialist force.
There have been many attempts to fix this. Noted example is Korean politician Park Young Rok who visited Germany for the 1970 Olympics and broke into the Berlin Olympic Stadium at night to fix Sohn's country to Korea. He fled to Korea with the letters J-A-P-A-N in hand.
In the beginning the Japanese national team wanted to kick Sohn and Nam out because they did not want to show the world that Koreans were better than Japanese athletes. When Sohn and Nam ranked 1st and 2nd respectively in the Olympic trials, they demanded a retrial in Berlin and added TWO more Japanese runners in hopes of disqualifying Sohn and Nam. Some of the Japanese players actually left the course and tried to take shortcuts to beat them. Sohn and Nam noticed this while running and swore that they would beat them no matter what.
They did.
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l-unitas · 20 days ago
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﹙ 𝟷𝟷:𝟷𝟷 ﹚ 。 ─ 귀여운 ꒰ 𝆬 ♡
𐇵 ݁ ׅ 𝟷𝟿𝟺 ─ ꒰ délicat ꒱ !
ℬ ─ ׁ ⿻ ♡ ׁ ⫬ ⫬ ﹙ 00:00﹚
ֺ  ਏਓ    𓂂  천사 ! 𝆬 ♡̲ 💭
⠀゚𓏸⠀ 💭   ! ㅅ_ㅅ      ☆̲⠀⠀ઇઉ ⠀ׅ⠀꧔ ׁ
⪩ 𔘓 ⪨ ׅ ❀ ׁ ^ ㅇ ^ ─ 마시다
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nanamins-overtime · 7 months ago
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Mfs will watch anti-capitalist commentaries like Parasite and Squid Game and then argue about which poor person was the villian of the story...
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boohwanj · 6 months ago
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2021-10-31
Canon EOS R6 + RF16mm f2.8
Instagram  |  hwantastic79vivid
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qlqniel · 7 months ago
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The Witches’ Woods
Seoraksan, November 2015
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koreanaswego · a day ago
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Korean Word of the Day
처음이에요
It's my first time
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dispone · a year ago
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bouquet vending machine in korea.
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lionfloss · 2 months ago
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Jaesung An
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femsolid · 3 months ago
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"She had her own reservations. Niggling fears of not getting a job; disappointing her family. But when her hairdresser tried to talk her out of it, she knew she'd made up her mind. She wanted short hair. And it wasn't just a matter of taste — it was a statement.
Sohee is part of the growing 'escape the corset' movement taking hold in South Korea, with women taking a stand against rigid beauty ideals and unlacing the metaphorical corset. "I realised that the makeup and outfits were not my decision and I do not actually like it," says Sohee, 26. "So I choose to take off the corset."
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Here, K-pop musicians aren't just stars; they're 'idols'. They attract millions of dedicated fans who have fallen for more than just their shiny, catchy lyrics. "They are just beautiful, they are just handsome," Yaejin, 20, tells me later at a tree-lined university campus in the capital's north-west. "They have so many surgeries, they lose weight, they put on so much makeup, they wear so many expensive shirts and clothes. They make teenagers want to be like them."
Lauren Lee, the founder of a company importing K-beauty products to Australia, says many K-pop stars are emblematic of unrealistic beauty expectations. "They've been chosen for their looks … and they're the people that you see represented over and over again in advertisements," she says. "And they're impossibly skinny. One thing that really, really shocks me is when these girls publish their diets, and they're basically starving themselves. They're eating an apple and a couple of pieces of fruit a day and coffee, and that's their diet." In the space of three months, three different K-pop stars have taken their own lives — prompting concerns about mental health in the industry, and mental health taboos in the country.
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In May 2016, a 23-year-old woman was murdered in a public toilet; picked at random by a man who later claimed to have been "ignored" by women throughout his life. Korean women turned to social media to air their frustration and share their experiences of sexual violence. They covered the dome walls of Gangnam Station with multi-coloured post-it notes bearing sobering messages. "It was misogyny that killed her." "If we are in solidarity we can be strong." They marched. And in the past few years, women have increasingly been rallying around a mounting list of concerns. In October, a woman reportedly suicided after finding out she was secretly filmed in a hospital change room, the latest in a string of spy-camera victims.
It comes after over 12,000 women protested in Seoul's Hyehwa Station in 2018 against illegal spy-camera filming — many of the videos end up on pornography websites. Korean women have also taken to the streets as part of #MeToo rallies; 70,000 turned up to this year's International Women's Day demonstration.
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Aside from forgoing makeup, Sohee is also shying away from relationships (with men). "Getting married is probably quite common in Korean culture," she tells me. "So when you get to your mid-20s, people are talking about 'when are you getting married?' or that kind of thing. (...) I don't need someone else to fulfil myself." She's not alone.
Growing numbers of South Korean women are turning their backs on marriage and children; the country's fertility rate fell to world-wide record low in 2019 (at one child per woman). "There are four movements promoted by women in their 20s in Korea," Professor NaYoung Lee explains. "No sex, no sexual romantic relationship, no marriage, no birth." MinYoung says having children is also a distant blip on her future horizon. "Many of my friends are doing no relationship … I don't like getting into relationships with men sometimes," she says. "When I become a mother, in Korean society, I have to give up one thing: career or baby." Sohee isn't ready to give up her career just yet, with ambitions to one day become a lawyer. With a job interview coming up, she's considering growing her hair out. She doesn't want to harm her prospects. Change comes slowly, MinYoung says with bitter conviction, recounting a recent example of a woman who was fired from a part-time café job for cutting her hair short.
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"Aren't you lonely?" This is a question student Moensan is used to being asked. The 26-year-old, who lives in a provincial city in South Korea, is unmarried and childless — and plans to keep it that way. "There are many things I want to do in life that you can't do if you get married," she said. "I saw with my own eyes how married women are treated and discriminated against, so I decided marriage does not help women at all." agrees Jung Se-Young. Moensan told the ABC she was spurred to action after hearing "the voice of many women" in youtubers' Jung and Baeck's calls to fight back against societal pressures and patriarchal expectations. It was, she said, "what married women go through, what has happened vividly around me, even what I went through that made me want to join in the #nomarriage movement. My father assaulted my mother, which is more common than I thought in Korea — I'm glad my mum and I didn't die," she said. The student said she never wanted to get married or have children because pregnancy and childbirth were "big risks for women in Korea", while marrying "narrows a woman's position".
Sohee says that while many of her university friends are joining the #escapethecorset movement, many outside campus are reluctant. "I know it is quite a hard decision," she says. "But I want I just want some other women to see me and get confidence."
The country where a simple haircut can be a radical political statement
#NoMarriage movement sees South Korean women reject Government pressures to marry and have kids
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venus-academia · 3 months ago
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for anyone who needs it : you will be ok. please be kinder to yourself. you deserve it.
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boobliz · 4 months ago
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forever is the sweetest con
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