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#kosher
shiraglassman · 2 months ago
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Jewish wlw romance flipped open to a page where their different levels of observance comes up in conversation
(Knit One Girl Two is out in paperback for the first time, bundled with two other stories! And it’s even large-print.)
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I like to pretend I know things about my religion and heritage. I am a liar. I know nothing. Despite it all, I still do not have a real answer when my gentile friends ask
“how can salt be kosher or unkosher.”
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writingwithcolor · 8 months ago
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I have a plot point where the group needs to seek counsel from their friend immediately, but because of how the plot is laid, they would theoretically be interrupting her during Shabbat dinner due to the urgency of the matter. I also have a Muslim character. Can they be discussing the urgent issue while eating together and if so, is there anything the Muslim character would not do/eat in accordance with his religion? No meat I think? Or should they just meet outside/not eat?
Interrupted by friends during Shabbat dinner, emergency | Also the Muslim diet
I have to research this because I think there’s some overlap between halal and kosher but I can’t remember in which direction (edited later: kashrut seems to be stricter.) 
I’d be okay with the interruption, especially if it involves something life or death -- especially bc “but it’s Shabbat!” illustrates how urgent the urgent matter is.
--Shira
So, I'm pretty sure kosher food is halal. I went to a Jewish primary school with a lot of Muslim students, and I remember that many Muslim parents liked that they didn't have to worry about the food there. Also, when I eat with my Muslim friends I can't have their food but I'm very used to knowing what kind of snacks I can pick up easily that don't rely on having kosher cutlery and crockery available. Glass is always kosher which is a very useful loophole, i.e. your Muslim character can have a glass plate and cup that they use for their food, put in their dishwasher etc and their Jewish friend can still use it. Hope that makes sense.
I'm also fine with Shabbat dinner being interrupted for something urgent. I'm sure everyone who keeps Shabbat regularly will have experienced that at some point. OP, you might want to look up the concept of pikuach nefesh, which is kind of an overriding principle of protecting life at the expense of other Torah commandments.
-Shoshi
I just looked this up. Here’s a Muslim page explaining that kosher meat is usually considered halal, although not everyone agrees:
Is Kosher Meat Halal? A Comparison of the Halakhic and Shar’i Requirements for Animal Slaughter
--Shira
The Muslim portion of this character is open to followers. 
Muslim mods are not active at this time. We’ll be recruiting for more mods soon; Muslim writers, feel free to apply anytime! 
https://forms.gle/qywJmrwcZj3E28nh8
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rimonoroni · 4 months ago
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Tonight on “things that are not kosher” we are presenting you with a fun list of unexpected animals you may or may not have known are not kosher!
1. Kangaroos
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Yes that’s right! While they do chew their cud, these marsupial fellas do not have split hooves. No eating for you then! It looks like the roos are safe!
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(For now.)
2. Rabbits
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Awww look at ‘em! Why would I wanna eat this little guy anyway??? He’s so cute! Yes, bunnies are indeed not kosher for eating, and all the pet owners cheered.
3. Sharks
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Thankfully, these endangered buddies are not okay to eat! No shark fin soup for the jews, and hopefully none for anybody. Ever. Don’t eat sharks, kids, they’re endangered. These terrifying adorable monsters need all the help they can get, and because they don’t have fins, kosher keeping jews cannot eat them. Hurrah!
4. Vultures
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This one is more well known! Vultures, as birds of prey, do not qualify as kosher birds to nom nom. Because of this classification, neither are hawks, raptors, or owls. Yes, neither are owls. Hm. Didn’t see that one coming. Hopefully this cute little guy above can go around reducing disease in natural ecosystems by consuming excess animal corpses instead of ending up in a humans dinner plate!
5. Dolphins
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Hah. Yeah. So funny thing, fish that don’t have scales aren’t kosher. And since dolphins don’t have scales and live on the ocean, they would be qualified as fish without scales. So. No eating dolphins, okay guys? I know that’s a hard rule to follow, but do ur best for me.
Bonus Kosher for Passover Round: Rice!
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For those who do not know, Passover is a holiday that imposes dietary restrictions for a certain number of days. These restrictions mostly consist of not eating bread that rises while it is being cooked, thus, matzah. Things that are cool to eat on Passover are dubbed as being kosher for Passover. But our friends in the Middle Ages in Europe who were determining these laws did not have access to rice, so the question stands: is rice kosher for Passover? Some say that no, as a grain that technically puffs up when you put it over fire, it cannot be eaten on Passover. Others say “fuck it, it’s rice” and I am one of those others, if you could not tell.
6. Leviathan?
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Aw mannn! It turns out that the primordial terrifying monster of the abyss might not be fit for nom noms! Though that’s still up in the air. Maybe he’s kosher, who knows! We’re still thinkin about it. Can’t wait to chow down on this bastard in the end times, so I’m gonna say he’s kosher because I want him to be!
And that wraps up our list!
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brbdaly · a year ago
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Respect religious dietary practices, medical dietary restrictions, and personal dietary lifestyles! 🥪🍎🥗
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tzipporahssong · 7 months ago
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🎵one of these things is not like the others🎵
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nakam1492 · 2 months ago
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Happy Tu b'Av and Shavua Tov 💙
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cayenaa · 5 months ago
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Preview of chapter 77 & 78
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Our baby bird is back 🐦❤️
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progressivejudaism · 7 months ago
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Come join this workshop/thinktank where you will be able to have space with Jewish texts, to help you make decisions about your Passover practice!
Suggested Contribution: $10 (Free Tickets Available March 8th)
See below for class description.
Curious how to keep Kosher for Passover?  Why to keep Kosher for Passover? (or why not?)  Come join student rabbi Josh to learn about Sephardic and Ashkenazi Traditions regarding eating on Passover -- and how the Reform and Conservative Movements have adapted medieval and ancient wisdom to fit our needs today.  
And most importantly:  workshop how you can enhance your practice over Passover to make your eating more meaningful, intentional, and spiritual.
This class will utilize both large group and small group discussions (chevruta).  
All WWT events are open to Jews and non-Jews, those partnered to Jews  and people who yearn to become Jewish, and anyone who needs a spiritual  learning home.
Please email Josh at JoshuaGischner@gmail.com if you have any  specific learning needs- I want to accommodate you as best as I can!
*** Free tickets will be available on Monday, March 8th.    Thank you so much to the many builders here at WWT who are committed   to creating financially accessible Jewish community with us! **
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didyoumeanxianity · 5 months ago
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Not really important question, but what does make kosher (forgive if I spelt wrong) salt different than regular sea salt? And on a semi-related tangent, can I as goy make a kosher meal by following specific instructions or is it a thing only Jewish people can make?
1) Funnily enough, I’d never thought much about the kosher salt/table salt difference beyond making sure I was using the right one when using a recipe to cook.
So, in the US, kosher salt got that name because it is the salt used to kasher meat, not because it is necessarily certified as kosher by any religious body (though some brands are).
For context: for meat to be kosher it has to be slaughtered in accordance with Jewish law (Halacha) which includes draining the meat of any blood. To ensure the blood is completely gone, the meat is kashered through a process of salting and rinsing the meat. The salt used is a flaky salt without additives (like iodine), and so in the US where pure flaky salt wasn’t in common use at the time (because iodonized table salt proliferated for health reasons) it came to be known as kosher salt. It also goes by the names flake salt or cooking salt, because of its texture and the lack of additives.
2) What a thoughtful question, I appreciate it. So, as a gentile, you can make a kosher-style meal by not mixing meat and dairy, using hekeshered (marked as kosher) foods, and avoiding any treyf. Making a truly kosher meal for those that adhere to all of the rules of kashrut will be difficult or almost impossible because it would require you to kasher your kitchen and your dishes/utensils/cookware (unless you regularly keep a kosher kitchen, but I’m assuming you don’t). But even making something kosher-style is a lovely gesture.
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sialiasnest · 6 months ago
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Perfect Passover Brownies (best for Second Seder)
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This is it: the perfect Passover brownie recipe. I have done it, at last!! Mad cackling and gloating. So, so good.
And really, pretty easy.
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Beat 2 eggs with
1 cup ultra fine sugar
1/2 cup light flavored olive oil
1 tsp real vanilla
6 Tbs dutched cocoa
1/2 cup Passover cake meal
2 Tbs potato starch
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
4 to 6 oz semisweet chocolate (chips, or a smashed or melted candy bar)
Pour into a prepared pan, let rest in fridge for several hours. Bake 350F until top is shiny and crackled. (between 180F and 195F interior, if you have a probe thermometer.)
Cool thoroughly. (Yeah, right) No really, get your fingers out of there. Let them cool. If possible, overnight. It will be good first day, but truly amazing second day.
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No one will say "not bad for Passover." Everyone will say "really good fudgy brownies."
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mockiatoh · 18 days ago
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I’m glad this water is pareve, but I’m worried it’s not klp. Can anyone weigh in?
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mispelled · 3 months ago
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If you're non-binary and vegan, you really are pareve
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writingwithcolor · 11 months ago
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hi, im a gentile writing an ashkenazi jewish character in a zombie apocalypse rpg and i have some questions about keeping kosher in such a setting, specifically with regards to properly slaughtering animals. from my understanding, the slaughtering must be performed by a trained shochet. in situations where such a person is unavailable, would my character realistically decide to do the slaughtering himself or would he just abstain from meat?
Kashrut in the Apocalypse
Probably just go vegetarian like some of the people I’m around if they’re in a situation where kosher meat is unavailable.
--Shira
Oh interesting! Maybe one of the character's parents was a shochet? It would be possible for the character to have been learning from them, at least enough to feel comfortable giving it a go in the Zombie Apocalypse.
Going vegetarian is a very real possibility, and it's likely they would do that first. I imagine as food got more scarce, they would be making more allowances. For instance, in the early days they would be eating carefully, trying to pick through cans of food to find things that are kosher certified, then later they are eating a vegetarian diet with whatever they can find. There may come a time when they try shechting themselves, simply because finding plant protein has become too difficult.
The preservation of life comes before most things, so doing your best in the extremity of that situation would be reasonable. Just avoid having them eat pork for the reader, it might encourage a more vicious, voyeuristic pleasure in watching people break laws, rather than the cool thing you are setting up: watching people do their best to keep their own traditions, in the worst circumstances.
-- Dierdra
Agree with all of Dierdra's great points -- and I want to add that point at the end about pork is very important. Pork seems to take a special role in the minds of Christians/culturally-Christian and ex-Christian atheists in terms of how much brain space seems to be spent on remembering that a lot of us don't eat it. I have a feeling watching someone eating non-ritually-slaughtered chicken would be a lot less voyeuristically weird than pork. Even another form of treyf like a crawdad wouldn't have the same semiotics, the same feeling of "Ha, got you."
--Shira
OP might find it cool to read about real-life situations where kosher-observant Jews have found themselves stuck in odd places without certified food. There’s even one in the musical Come From Away (in fact, I know someone who is related to the real rabbi that character is based on), so you don’t have to look as far as you might think – certainly not as far as the apocalypse!
--Shoshi
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johnthestitcher · a year ago
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My ‘Kosher Wizard’ costume - I thought I would post these to bring some amusement to your day! Hate to tell ya’ll - wearing a big ol’ pointy hat with a large brim on a hot day - NOPE! This bejeweled kippah does the trick nicely!
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chavahyocheved · 6 months ago
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Nice thing about being vegetarian is that it’s not hard to keep kosher 😎
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nakam1492 · 4 months ago
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Soyrizo Shakshouka with Smoked, Sweet, and Hot paprika, Cumin, Long Green hot pepper, red bell pepper, onion, garlic, Cilantro, feta, and looots of olive oil😋💙💙
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cayenaa · 8 months ago
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Here comes the moment y'al were waitin' for... Thank me🥺❤️
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