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#krazy kat
archivedeathdrive · a month ago
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George Herriman, c1922
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m00ndingochan · a month ago
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teaboxcarmarbles · 2 months ago
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These silent film Cartoons are very sad 😢 Lets see what makes them so sad 😿😿😿🐰
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bones-and-whatnot · 5 months ago
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Every friend group should include a bimbo,
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a mean bisexual,
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an even meaner lesbian,
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she/theyhims
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and he/theys,
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a token straight that’s on thin ice,
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an astrology bitch who has everyone’s birth chart memorized,
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and a short king.
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xipiti · 6 months ago
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Cool shirt available from Fantagraphics
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rodrigobaeza · 7 months ago
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George Herriman: Krazy Kat original art (1934)
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animationproclamations · 2 months ago
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Krazy Kat? That's Felix!!!
"Film Daily," December 16, 1927.
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michiganrag · 2 months ago
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thebristolboard · a year ago
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A sample of Krazy Kat title panels by George Herriman, 1936. All of these were taken from George Herriman’s Krazy Kat: The Complete Color Sundays 1935–1944 published by Taschen. I always wondered why Herriman included quotes and/or a period.
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nobrashfestivity · 9 months ago
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George Joseph Herriman  Krazy Kat, October 1917
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journalofanobody · 7 months ago
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Krazy Kat Christmas. George Herriman.
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m00ndingochan · a month ago
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100yearoldcomics · 4 months ago
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March 15, 1922 Krazy Kat by George Herriman
[ID: Krazy Kat stands on the edge of a pond, his hands on his hips. /end] Krazy: Oy, "Ignatz" where is thou at?
[ID: Krazy turns around as Ignatz pokes his head up out of the water. /end] Krazy: Thee is nowhere from wot I see.
[ID: Ignatz ZIPs a brick at Krazy's head. /end] Krazy: Ah-h, there him is.
[ID: Officer Pupp walks up and spies the brick. /end] Pupp: Hm-m, a "brick."
[ID: Pupp tosses the brick back into the pond. /end] Pupp: I'll toss it into this pond so that "Mouse" won't get it.
[ID: Ignatz rises out of the water, stunned from the brick's impact. Pupp walks off. /end] Pupp: Hey, "Krazy," one moment.
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toonycryptid · a year ago
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Oldest toons on the block.
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ebookporn · 15 days ago
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E. E. Cummings and Krazy Kat
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by Amber Medland
The Kat had a cult following among the modernists. For Joyce, Fitzgerald, Stein, and Picasso, all of whose work fed on playful energies similar to those unleashed in the strip, he had a double appeal, in being commercially nonviable and carrying the reek of authenticity in seeming to belong to mass culture. By the thirties, strips like Blondie were appearing daily in roughly a thousand newspapers; Krazy appeared in only thirty-five. The Kat was one of those niche-but-not-really phenomena, a darling of critics and artists alike, even after it stopped appearing in newspapers. Since then: Umberto Eco called Herriman’s work “raw poetry”; Kerouac claimed the Kat as “the immediate progenitor” of the beats; Stan Lee (Spider-Man) went with “genius”; Herriman was revered by Charles Schulz and Theodor Geisel alike. But Krazy Kat was never popular. The strip began as a sideline for Herriman, who had been making a name for himself as a cartoonist since 1902. It ran in “the waste space,” literally underfoot the characters of his more conventional 1910 comic strip The Dingbat Family, published in William Randolph Hearst’s New York Evening Journal. Hearst gave Herriman a rare lifetime contract and, with his backing, by 1913 the liminal kreatures had their own strip. Most people disliked not being able to understand it. Soon advertisers worried that formerly loyal readers would skip the strips and miss the ads. Editors were infuriated by devices like Herriman’s “intermission” panel, which disrupted the narrative by stalling the action. 
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teaboxcarmarbles · a year ago
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I wanted to draw a bunch of 1920s cats in Band!
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Please love these forgotten cartoons Kitty’s! ;A;
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