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#lodgepole pines
riverwindphotography · a month ago
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Arrows to the Sky
(c) riverwindphotography, May 2022
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Canyon walls above Yellowstone Falls, Wyoming
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awkwardbotany · 8 months ago
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The Serotinous Cones of Lodgepole Pine
The Serotinous Cones of Lodgepole Pine
Behind the scales of a pine cone lie the seeds that promise future generations of pine trees. Even though the seeds are not housed within fruits as they are in angiosperms (i.e. flowering plants), the tough scales of pine cones help protect the developing seeds and keep them secure until the time comes for dispersal. In some species, scales open on their own as the cone matures, at which point…
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conifersgarden · a year ago
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cafffine · a year ago
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I have Disease disease I was posting on here during my final like was it really necessary for me to reblog that gif set of mr mandalorian in the middle of my dissertation on lodgepole pine weevils?? Was it??
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mageintime · 2 years ago
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Provincial and Territorial Trees of Canada 🌳🌲
Sept 25th, 2019 is National Tree Day here in Canada! Some of you folks might recognise these - I did a series recently where I drew all the official Provincial and Territorial Trees of Canada (Including the proposed tree for Nunavut). I wanted to combine them all into a forest design, and here is the result!  Trees present are: Lodgepole Pine (Alberta), Western Red Cedar (British Columbia), White Spruce (Manitoba), Balsam Fir (New Brunswick), Black Spruce (Newfoundland and Labrador), Tamarack Larch (Northwest Territories), Red Spruce (Nova Scotia), Arctic Willow (Nunavut), Eastern White Pine (Ontario), Red Oak (Prince Edward Island), Yellow Birch (Quebec), White Birch (Saskatchewan), Subalpine Fir (Yukon), and the Sugar Maple.
Designs available on Redbubble in 4 6 colours! I may offer more in the future if there’s demand for them, but these were my favourite from the combos I tried! 
🌲Deep Green🌲 🌳Light Green🌳 🍂Golden Yellow 🍂 🍃Birch Grey 🍃
New!🍁Maple Red 🍁 and 🍵White & Blue Porcelain🍵
UPDATE: Added two more colours! I also adjusted the sizing of the patterns on redbubble, but this meant I had to re-make the works. The links have been updated!
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usernamewithheld · 2 years ago
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noir-poetography · 2 years ago
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Lodgepole by Sunset
© 2019, James Blatter
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thisbirdsgottafly · 3 years ago
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Old burn scar. 7/21/19
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riverwindphotography · 5 months ago
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A lone Lodgepole Pine, standing strong. Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming
(c) riverwindphotography, March 2022
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wallabyshark · 4 years ago
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took this chance to make a silly doodle of lodgepole into a drawing of the shirt i’m ordering from my friend’s custom shirt printing business
if you’re interested in buying one of these or another custom design, message me and i’ll get you in contact with them!
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circuslollipop · 3 years ago
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kinda considering going by a different pen name than one that stemmed from a username i thought of when i was like 14.....but at the same time, Wild is like, my brand
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meaganhealy · a month ago
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Testing my knowledge of lodgepole pine tree anatomy in real life while I have the chance.
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regnum-plantae · 4 years ago
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Know your festive conifers
I mentioned before that I started working in a garden centre -I’m so happy my change-of-career plans are already beginning to work!- and today it’s actually been a whole month. This first month there has been decisively marked from the very beginning by the fact Christmas is approaching: my first day happened to be when the main delivery of Christmas trees arrived, so it was entirely spent unloading hundreds of conifers, which we then freed from their nets, separated, measured and finally positioned in their pens during the following days. 
Needless to say, I’ve learnt a lot about the most common Christmas trees you could find in a garden centre in the UK this time of the year. I’ve also ended up reading briefly about the tree farming industry and what it entails in the UK, rest of Europe and America with their differences. But this is not meant to be a post about a tradition which is quite new to me -decorating a real cut tree is not nearly as popular in Italy- its history or the industry it supports, so let’s get to the trees. 
From top to bottom, they are ordered by their popularity as I’ve experienced it, although most of the stock was of the first two species and we only offered a few of the other three.
1. Nordmann fir  Abies nordmanniana, Pinaceae
Very large tree native to the southern and eastern coast of the Black Sea. It’s considered the favourite and the best seller in the UK for two main reasons: it retains its needles, which are soft and have a notched tip, and its spaced layers of symmetrical, almost horizontal, sturdy branches are ideal to accommodate heavy or large ornaments. Especially when young and under 6ft it can look quite wide and bushy at the bottom with a sparse top and often a very long and straight leader. 
2. Fraser fir  Abies fraseri, Pinaceae
Medium-sized tree native to the southeastern Appalachian Mountains. Also very popular, mostly because it’s sheared in the field to retain a conical shape and this results in a slimmer bottom, ideal for small spaces, and high density of soft branches, which work better with small, light ornaments. The stem and branches seem to grow in a sinuous fashion and the tree often has more than a single central leader tip, which is generally not straight, but twisty too. Its citrus-y sent and the ability to retain its needles help making it a popular choice.   
3. Lodgepole pine  Pinus contorta, Pinaceae
Medium to large tree or shrub, depending on the subspecies, native to western and north-western North America. As the only Pinus in the list, it looks rather different from the other trees and decorating it can be a challenge, people seem to either love it or hate it, so we only stocked a handful of them. It tends to be quite bushy and, as the name suggests, the trunk can often be twisted. It smells like clean pine forest and is very good at holding its needles. 
4. Rocky Mountain fir  Abies lasiocarpa, Pinaceae
Generally medium-sized tree which shares its native area with the lodgepole pine in north-western North America. This was a novelty species at the garden centre and we only stocked a few large ones. Most people seemed to love its imposing, but airy and symmetrical structure and blue-grey hue and it’s probably my personal favourite. Its scent is aromatic and as interesting as the colour.
5. Norway spruce  Picea abies, Pinaceae
Large tree native to an area spanning from the mountains of southern Europe to Siberia. Most people recognise it as the traditional, old-school Christmas tree, however it has now fallen out of fashion as the worst performing in the list when it comes to retaining its needles. For this reason we mostly stocked pot-grown trees of this species, and just a handful of small, cut ones. The short, thin needles give it a feathery look compared to the others and its structure is similar to that of the Nordmann fir.  
Now, just out of curiosity, I’d love to see lists made by my counterparts in the rest of the world! Also, if you have bought a tree, what species is it? 
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staudnhuckn · 7 months ago
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OMG so cute - American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) on a lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta)
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
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