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#maría félix
robertocustodioart · 6 months ago
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María Félix by Lord Snowdon 1975
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anahuacalli · 26 days ago
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María Félix en la versión recién restaurada de Rio Escondido (1948) por la Cineteca Nacional.
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gatutor · 8 days ago
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María Félix "Enamorada" 1946, de Emilio Fernandez.
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mexicoporsiempre · 2 months ago
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María Félix y Diego Rivera se encontraron en el Capri a principios de enero de 1955.
María: Hola ateo.
Diego: Ya no soy ateo porque tengo a una Diosa.
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yourdailyqueer · a year ago
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María Félix (deceased)
Gender: Female
Sexuality: Bisexual
DOB: 8 April 1914  
RIP: 8 April 2002
Ethnicity: Mexican
Occupation: Actress, singer
Note: Was one of the most successful figures of Latin American cinema in the 1940s and 1950s. Considered one of the most beautiful actresses of Mexican cinema, her taste for the finesse and strong personality garnered her the title of diva early in her career.
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celebssmoking · 2 months ago
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language-sanctuary · a year ago
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What is Día de Muertos?
(If you’re white, especially if you’re from the US, you’re obligated to reblog this post. I’m sorry, I don’t make the rules)
Día de Muertos is the most important and well-known tradition of indigenous origin in México celebrated on November first and second. It is a world heritage tradition. That is why so important that we are careful to portray it respectfully. 
For us Mexicans, making altares is a way to cope with death, it is something that brings us closer to our loved ones who have passed way. I’ve discussed with my mother and my father in a very intimate way what they would like me to put in her altar when they pass away and I intend to learn how to make my mother’s favorite dishes so she’ll like them when she comes back to visit and she can be proud of me. That takes some of the fear out of things, to know that for one night every year I’ll have a chance to honor my loved ones and remember them fondly.
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What does an altar usually have?
A figurine of a dog, usually a xoloitzcuintle, the sacred dog of the Aztecs, who will help the deceased person make their way to the land of the living and back to the land of the dead.
A photo of the deceased person
Copal (ancient incense that was offered to the gods in indigenous traditions, it clenses the space and helps guide the spirits to the altar).
Cempaxóchitl or Mexican marigold. This means “twenty flowers” or “flower of twenty petals” in náhuatl, Mexico’s most spoken indigenous language. Its bright yellow color and scent helps spirits return to the land of the living.  
Multiple candles
In ancient times, real skulls were used, but they have since been replaced with sugar skulls that have the name of the deceased person written on the forehead.
Pan de muerto (Bread of the Dead), which is a representation of the mortal body (supposed to represent the skeleton, more specifically the hand)
Papel picado (tissue paper with cut-out shapes) that represent that this is a party and shows how happy we are to have them with us once more.
The deceased person’s favorite foods and beverages, and any objects that they might have used a lot while they were alive (musical instruments, their glasses, a typewriter, their favorite books, etc).
Calaveritas, which narrate in a comical or endearing, even a bit tongue-in-cheek way a person’s encounter with death.
Now, some common questions under the “read more”. 
If I’m not Mexican, can I dress as a Catrina/Catrín for Halloween (or at all)? No. Please avoid doing so. We do not paint our faces to appear scary, and it is not really a costume, but a way to relate to the spirits who are coming back and they are meant to guard off death.  
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If I am visiting México during a Día de Muertos celebration, how should I behave? Usually people will put their altars on the main plaza and relatives of the deceased person will be taking care of it. You can ask questions, most will be happy to tell about the deceased person, they might even give you a pamphlet about their accomplishments or their story. Do not step into the cempaxóchitl or the tinted sawdust, do not touch anything, those are specially put there so the spirits can find the altar easily.
Can altars be made of non-Mexican people? Yes. It is very common to see altars dedicated to famous non-Mexican people, like Anne Frank, Martin Luther Kind, Andy Warhol, etc, (I once saw one of Trump that said “1946-hopefully soon”), usually made by kids for a school project.
Is Coco from Disney a good representation of Mexican culture? Kind of. It is definitely more in the appreciation side of the spectrum more than cultural appropriation. The studio did such an enormous amount of research and the outcome was amazing. Miguel? He is the cartoon version of so many of my cousins. The movie has so many easter eggs you will only get if you’re familiar with Mexican culture, like María Félix, el Santo, the architecture, or the fact that Ernesto de la Cruz was inspired by José Alfredo Jiménez. They did add a lot of lore to make the movie flow better. However... it is still Disney.
When making Coco, Disney did everything in their power to copyright Día de Muertos so they could use it as a title, in promotional materials and merchandise. I hope you can see why that is problematic, especially when it’s coming from a white, culturally dominant country towards a POC, primarily poor country; especially when they intended to profit from an indigenous-originated celebration in a country when 75% of the indigenous population that has survived the genocide caused by the Conquest is in extreme poverty.
Please support Mexican artisans, indigenous creators, mixed creators. If you want to really know about Mexican culture, watch actual Mexican movies. Would you watch Mulan if you wanted to be introduced to Chinese culture? I really hope not. Please watch actual Mexican movies.
I hope this was helpful for anyone who didn’t know how to behave respectfully around this time of year, or even if you wanted to know about Día de Muertos from an actual Mexican person. Here’s my ko-fi if you wanna buy me a $2 coffee for the time and effort I put into this blog! 
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rosigerante · 2 months ago
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María Lisa Félix
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Oaxaca, julio de 2018.
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La diosa arrodillada (Roberto Gavaldón, 1947)
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anahuacalli · 3 months ago
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Premio Ariel a la Mejor Actriz: 1946 – 1951, Academia Mexicana de Artes y Ciencias Cinematográficas (AMACC).
1946: Dolores del Río - Las abandonadas
1947: María Félix - Enamorada
1948: Blanca Estela Pavón - Cuando lloran los valientes
1949: María Félix - Río Escondido
1950: Marga López - Salón México (1948)
1951: María Félix - Doña Diabla
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gatutor · a month ago
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María Félix-Arturo de Córdova "La diosa arrodillada" 1947, de Roberto Gavaldón.
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mexicoporsiempre · 2 months ago
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 María Félix y Diego Rivera, 1955
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viktor-sbor · 4 months ago
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María de los Ángeles Félix Güereña, known as María Félix (1914 – 2002), was a Mexican film actress and singer. 
Colorized by Jose Gades.
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ohyeahpop · a year ago
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María Félix in Still from an outtake sequence from the movie La Generala, Directed by Juan Ibáñez, México, 1970, Juan Manuel Palomino Torres
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