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#medicine
mysharona1987 · 5 months ago
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This is why fat shaming can have tragic consequences.
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biomedicool · a year ago
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A man from London has become the second person in the world to be cured of HIV, doctors say.
Adam Castillejo is still free of the virus more than 30 months after stopping anti-retroviral therapy.
He was not cured by the HIV drugs, however, but by a stem-cell treatment he received for a cancer he also had.
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leeshajoy · a month ago
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A lot of the substances we think of as protection against the supernatural (e.g. salt, silver, garlic) are actually antibacterial, and would have helped stave off infections and illnesses that people once attributed to supernatural influence.
Based on this, I want to see a story where vampires are repelled by hand sanitizer.
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themedicalstate · 7 months ago
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After thirty years of intensive research, we can now answer many of the questions posed earlier. The recycle rate of a human being is around sixteen hours. After sixteen hours of being awake, the brain begins to fail. Humans need more than seven hours of sleep each night to maintain cognitive performance. After ten days of just seven hours of sleep, the brain is as dysfunctional as it would be after going without sleep for twenty-four hours. Three full nights of recovery sleep (i.e., more nights than a weekend) are insufficient to restore performance back to normal levels after a week of short sleeping. Finally, the human mind cannot accurately sense how sleep-deprived it is when sleep-deprived.
Matthew Walker PhD, Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
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apersnicketylemon · a year ago
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Remember kids! NEVER save left-over antibiotics! You should never have leftover antibiotics, because you have to finish the whole course! Not doing so, or giving your antibiotics to someone else who hasn’t been prescribed them is how we got superbugs, that are resistant to antibiotics! 
ALWAYS finish your antibiotics, even if you don’t think you’re sick anymore! NEVER give your antibiotics to other people, there is no guaruntee they will have any effect, or the same effect, and without a full course, will not help them even if it is the right medicine for the job. 
BOTH cases result in resistant superbugs, which are dangerous to everyone, and hurt everyone. You might think you’re helping your poorer friends who cannot afford an antibiotic/to be seen by a doctor, but you’re not. You’re just hurting everyone. 
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lazyyogi · a year ago
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Some Covid19 infographics to help put everything into context and perspective. Stay safe and stay smart. Be calm and responsible and kind.
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blunt-science · a year ago
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The Importance of Hand Washing: 5 Different Washing Durations and their Efficiency. (Glowing Regions Show Dirt and Microorganisms). 
1. Before Washing, 2. Rinse and Shake, 3. Six Second Wash No Soap, 4. Six Second Wash with Soap, 5. Fifteen Second Wash with Soap, 6. Thirty Second Wash with Soap.
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whovianfloozy · a year ago
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Epi Pen PSA -- could save a life!
In addition to my breast cancer, I have the joy of multiple autoimmune diseases. One of them causes me to have anaphylaxis to myself, so in addition to the bi-weekly cancer chemo I receive monthly Immunotherapy. They will not administer it at your appointment unless you have your Epi Pens with you, because the Immunotherapy itself can cause anaphylaxis and you may need it on the ride home.
I had Immunotherapy Monday, and as the chemo fog has fried my brain, I decided to get out my box and check on when my Epi Pens expire while I was sitting there for my 30 minute post delivery observation, My Nurse noticed me looking at the box, and I told her I was checking the expiration date.
She walked over and told me the date I was looking at was only the expiration date of the prescription, not the actual Epinephrine syringe. Where I live, pill bottles and the like typically say "Drug Z, Filled 1-2-33,Good until 1-2-34, 5 refills expires 1-2-34" so Drug Z was good for a year and so was the prescription.
The tag on my Epi Pen box said "Filled 4-10-19 Expires 4-10-20"
She told me that Epi Pens were different, the tag on the box was the date for the prescription expiration only. The medication, the actual Epinephrine expiration dates were only on the syringes themselves. She then proceeded to open the box, remove the sheaths, open them and remove the syringes, and show me the expiration dates.
My Epi Pens had been dispensed in April 2019, and had expired in July of 2019. My Epi Pens, on which my life might depend, had expired SEVEN FREAKING MONTHS AGO. They had had a lifespan of three months.
I was angry, and horrified. They immediately sent a new scrip to my pharmacy of course and I thanked her for telling me as it potentially could have saved my life. I also asked her to inform every single patient who came in that office, and she will.
She told me that every single time I pick up an Epi Pen prescription, immediately go sit in one of the waiting chairs, open up the box, and check the dates on the syringes. If it's not a year, go back up and demand they take them back and order new syringes with a one year life span, as typically we are renewing them with a few days lee way either way once we know the true expiration date..
If for some reason they refuse call your insurance company and they should raise hell. Apparently this is legal because when the pharmacy gets a scrip and orders the pens, the manufacturer is not sending expired merchandise. And of course, if there's an issue, the consumer didn't fulfill their responsibility to check the expiration date.
Two years ago, I anaphylaxed alone at home. It progressed fast, and as soon as I unlocked the front door and called 911, I delivered a pen through my jeans into my thigh. It didn't stop the progress. They gave me a dose of Epi, and a giant dose of steroids in the ambulance, and they met us with an intubation kit at the hospital.
The responders and Docs in the ED at first were wondering if I had delivered the pen properly of course, but as they quickly removed my clothes they saw the syringe bruise and the drop of dried blood right in the right place. For the remainder of my hospital stay they couldn't figure out why the Epi Pen hadn't stopped or at least slowed it down. That's what they do, they don't reverse it.
Now I look back and wonder. I had tossed the used pen in the trash immediately, and thrown out the other in it's box when I came home from the hospital with a new two pack. What if the syringe I had used had expired six or seven or nine months before? What if my new kit had expired four months later?
I am furious, and frightened for those who don't know, I've already contacted my best friend for her husband, and my niece for her little girl. I will be contacting my GP to see if he knew this and every one else I know eventually, and asking them to spread the word.
Check your Epi Pens, tell every one you know, and please signal boost this and REBLOG IT to spread the word. 
Thanks guys, and be well. Love  xXx
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themedicalstate · 7 months ago
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Blue and Gold
Anatomical Art by NKDArtGallery
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legohotel · 4 months ago
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one of my favorite things about human physiology is the way our eyes change when we look at someone we love. our pupils dilate automatically like they do when it’s dark outside and they’re trying to let more light in. except now it’s the light of your favorite person. the edges of our eyes soften a little and they sometimes even get watery which we also can’t control. tears of joy. we tend to raise our eyebrows as if we’re trying to make our eyes bigger. trying to get a better vision and seeing all the details. we tend to blink less than usual just to make the moment last a bit longer. even if it’s just a second. or when you smile at someone with your entire face involved and your eyes just crinkle and create a sparkle in them. and it all happens so effortlessly and universally.
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studyblr · a year ago
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8 hours of studying, 2 coffees, 2 sandwiches and so much biochemistry & immunology later, i can at least safely say today was productive (and binge a new netflix show). still can’t get over how pretty this library is.
ig: softlyshade
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themedicalstate · 6 months ago
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Anatomical Illustrations by Duvet Days
An organization that uses design to create awareness, self discovery, and a space for self-love while supporting those affected by rape and domestic abuse.
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viterbofangirl · a year ago
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Coronavirus Advice from Respiratory Therapist
BEST PROCEDURES TO STAY OUT OF THE HOSPITAL!!!
They are calling on Respiratory therapists to help fight the Coronavirus, and I am a retired one, too old to work in a hospital setting. So I'm going to share some commonsense wisdom with those that have the virus and are trying to stay home. If my advice is followed as given, you will improve your chances of not ending up in the hospital on a ventilator. This applies to the otherwise generally healthy population, so use discretion.
1. Only high temperatures kill a virus, so let your fever run high. Tylenol, Advil. Motrin, Ibuprofen etc. will bring your fever down allowing the virus to live longer. They are saying that ibuprofen, Advil etc. will exacerbate the virus. Use common sense and don't let fever go over 103 or 104 if you got the guts. If it gets higher than that take your Tylenol, not ibuprofen or Advil to keep it regulated. It helps to keep house warm and cover up with blankets, so body does not have to work so hard to generate the heat. It usually takes about 3 days of this to break the fever. 2. The body is going to dehydrate with the elevated temperature so you must rehydrate yourself regularly, whether you like it or not. Gatorade with real sugar, or Pedialyte with real sugar for kids, works well. Why the sugar? Sugar will give your body back the energy it is using up to create the fever. The electrolytes and fluid you are losing will also be replenished by the Gatorade. If you don't do this and end up in the hospital, they will start an IV and give you D5W (sugar water) and Normal Saline to replenish electrolytes. Gatorade is much cheaper, pain free, and comes in an assortment of flavors  
3. You must keep your lungs moist. Best done by taking long steamy showers on a regular basis. If you're wheezing or congested use a real minty toothpaste and brush your teeth while taking the steamy shower and deep breathe through your mouth. This will provide some bronchial dilation and help loosen the phlegm. Force yourself to cough into a wet washcloth pressed firmly over your mouth and nose, which will cause greater pressure in your lungs forcing them to expand more and break loose more of the congestion.   4. Eat healthy and regularly. Got to keep your strength up.   5. Once the fever breaks, start moving around to get the body back in shape and blood circulating.   6. Deep breathe on a regular basis, even when it hurts. If you don't it becomes easy to develop pneumonia. Pursed lip breathing really helps. That's breathing in deep and slow, then exhaling through tight lips as if your blowing out a candle. Blow until you have completely emptied your lungs and you will be able to breathe in an even deeper breath. This helps keep lungs expanded as well as increase your oxygen level.   7. Remember that every medication you take is merely relieving the symptoms, not making you well.   8. If you’re still dying, go to ER! I've been doing these things for myself and my family for over 40 years and kept them out of the hospital, all are healthy and still living today. Thank you all for sharing. We’ve got to help one another. Declan Stokes Retired respiratory therapist
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