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#memory for forgetfulness: august beirut 1982
luthienne · a month ago
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Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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thebluesthour · 8 months ago
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“He who watches the sea doesn’t know the sea. He who sits by the shore doesn’t know the sea. And he who comes only to look doesn’t know the sea. Only he who dives knows the sea. He takes risks. He forgets the sea in the sea. He dissolves in the unknown, as he might in a lover. Nothing to separate the blueness from the water. And there you seize upon a world that words can’t get hold of. It can’t be seen or touched except in the depths of the sea. The sea is the sea.
Mahmoud Darwish, Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982
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lesgardenias · 2 years ago
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“Coffee should not be drunk in a hurry. It is the sister of time, and should be sipped slowly, slowly. Coffee is the sound of taste, a sound for the aroma. It is a meditation and a plunge into memories and the soul.”
—Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982
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xiaodaozhang · 2 months ago
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[id: three gifs. 1st gif: a scene from the cdrama “guardian” from episode 23. a shot of zhao yunlan and a shot of shen wei are blended together. yunlan’s expression is shocked and confused. shen wei’s eyes are glassy and red from crying. he looks at yunlan, looking into his eyes, then to his lips, then to his eyes again. there’s a simple text in white caps in the middle reading “you are worth it”. the same phrase is spelt out in the background in hanzi. 2nd gif: the jinlintai scene from the cdrama “the untamed” from episode 42. also two shots blended together, this time of lan wangji and wei wuxian. the look at each other, both smiling lovingly. wuxian also first looks into wangji’s eyes, and then at his lips. simple text in white caps in the middle reading “lan zhan ah lan zhan”. the same phrase is spelt out in the background in hanzi. 3rd gif: a scene from the cdrama “word of honor” from episode 32. the scene at the cliff. it starts with only wen kexing in the frame. zhou zishu walks towards him and stops right in front of him. they look at each other with deep affection. simple text in white caps in the middle reading “you are mine”. the same phrase is spelt out in the background in hanzi. /end id]
– Do you have any weapons on you?
– I have a longing that’s killing me.
— Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982. (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
镇魂 Guardian ep. 23 陈情令 The Untamed ep. 42 山河令 Word of Honor ep. 32
insp.
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luthienne · 2 months ago
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Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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xshayarsha · 8 months ago
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… you’re the dawning of madness, the dawning of hell, the dawning of paradise,
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982.
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loveyouforl000years · 2 months ago
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YOU WANT TO DIE FOR LOVE, YOU ALWAYS HAVE
excerpt from ‘homosexuality’ by frank o’hara / excerpt from ‘memory for forgetfulness: august, beirut, 1982’ by mahmoud darwish / excerpt from ‘when rome falls; bloodsport’ by yves olade / excerpt from ‘the dream thieves’ by maggie stiefvater / excerpt from ‘history of love’ by nicole krauss
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luthienne · 3 months ago
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Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
For context: this is written within a work regarding the siege of Beirut in 1982. “Memory for Forgetfulness is an extended reflection on the invasion and its political and historical dimensions. It is also a journey into personal and collective memory. What is the meaning of exile? What is the role of the writer in time of war? What is the relationship of writing (memory) to history (forgetfulness)?” (x)
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soracities · 2 years ago
i absolutely adore you and your blog! do you have any recommendations (besides your posts obviously) for a beginner, like what would be the the books/poems/collections etc you think everyone should read? thank you!
I have no idea when this was sent so I’m very, very sorry for how late this is.
As far as recommendations go, I’m very, very careful about “should read” – it is  highly nebulous and entirely subjective territory and it really depends on what exactly it is you’re looking for–I took it as gospel when I was younger and a lot of my early experiences with the literary canon were incredibly unfulfilling (and also, very isolating) as a result. I don’t know what you’re into, either, so I can really only give you what I’ve loved or learned most from which is definitely not a prescriptive ‘should’.
In any case, I made a previous list here that I hope helps, at least as a starting point. It focuses on works of classic fiction (both older and contemporary) which might be a good place to begin with, but if you’d prefer something more specific just let me know and I’ll try my best.
For poetry, I think anthologies are probably the easiest way to discover and build your own tastes because they’re so varied, so maybe try the following:
A Book of Luminous Things (ed. Czesław Miłosz )
Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times (ed. Neil Astley)
The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry (ed. Ilya Kaminsy)
Whetu Moana: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English (ed. Reina Whaitiri, Albert Wendt, Robert Sullivan)
The Poetry of Arab Women (ed. Nathalie Handal)
Hinterland: Caribbean Poetry from the West Indies and Britain (ed. E.A. Markham)
The various volumes of the Oxford and Norton Anthologies might also be useful
And as for individual collections and non-fiction, I think the following are all worth a look–it’s far from exhaustive (and like I said, I have no idea what you like at all), but they’re the ones I started with / found most accessible (either in terms of style or substance or just general feeling), so hopefully you might find something you like too, or at least find paths you can branch off from:
Poetry (collections)
Sonnets and Elegies (Rainer Maria Rilke)
Leaves of Grass (Walt Whitman)
Crush (Richard Siken)
Where the Sidewalk Ends (Shel Silverstein)
Bright Dead Things, Ada Limón
The Captain’s Verses / Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair (Pablo Neruda)
The Essential Haiku, Versions of Basho, Buson and Issa (ed. and trans. Robert Hass)
The Trouble with Poetry (Billy Collins)
What the Living Do (Marie Howe)
Loose Woman (Sandra Cisneros)
The Wild Iris / Averno (Louise Glück)  
Wild Geese: Selected Poems (Mary Oliver)
The Black Unicorn (Audre Lorde)
The Dream of a Common Language (Adrienne Rich)
The World’s Wife / Rapture (Carol Ann Duffy)
What Is This Thing Called Love? / Tell Me (Kim Addonizio)
The Ink Dark Moon: Love Poems by Ono no Komachi and Izumi Shikibu
Selected Poems (Nizar Qabbani)
100 Poems (e.e. cummings)
Without an Alphabet, Without a Face (Saadi Youssef)
A Tree Within (Octavio Paz)
Almond Blossoms and Beyond / Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (Mahmoud Darwish)
Selected Poems / Songs and Ballads (Lorca)
Rose (Li-Young Lee)
The Cinnamon Peeler: Poems (Michael Ondaatje)
Poems and Prose (Christina Rossetti)
Helen of Troy (Sara Teasdale)
Bride of Ice (Marina Tsvetaeva)
Collected Poems (Langston Hughes)
Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (Emily Dickinson)
Collected Poems (Anna Akhmatova)
Collected Poems (Sylvia Plath)
Collected Poems (Lucille Clifton)
The War Poets (the most famous: Wilfred Owen  / Siegfried Sassoon, but maybe try Sidney Keyes if you can find him)
The Romantics (Keats / Shelley / Wordsworth / Coleridge / Byron / Blake)
Essays and other non-fiction:
Letters to a Young Poet (Rainer Maria Rilke)
Upstream (Mary Oliver)
Ways of Seeing (John Berger)
Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays (Zadie Smith)
A Field Guide to Getting Lost / The Faraway Nearby (Rebecca Solnit)
Sister Outsider: Essays (Audre Lorde)
The Fire Next Time / Notes of a Native Son (James Baldwin–or honestly, anything by him)
Reborn: Journals and Notebooks / As Consciousness Is Harnessed into Flesh: Journals and Notebooks (Susan Sontag–and if that settles well maybe her essays afterwards)
A Room of One’s Own (Virginia Woolf)
Plainwater: Essays and Poetry (Anne Carson)
The Souls of Black Folk (W. E. B. Du Bois)
Like I said, this is by no means exhaustive, and I’m not big into ‘should’ ( if anyone has more recommendations though please add them on!). At the end of the day, I think literature is a deeply personal experience and you ought to feel free to follow it wherever it takes you. If you want to gain better literary fluency or a deeper of understanding of a time period/art movement/culture then that’s a completely different thing, of course, but otherwise my best advice is to just feel your way through it and follow what resonates most with you. My only real ‘should’ is to read as widely and freely as you can, search out voices that don’t sound like yours or whose worlds are completely different to the one you live in, and to find what comforts you, what confronts you (equally important), what makes you question and what gives you answers and also, more than anything else, what you enjoy.
Anyway, I hope this helps. Happy reading, anon x
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xshayarsha · 7 months ago
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He who watches the sea doesn’t know the sea. He who sits by the shore doesn’t know the sea. And he who comes only to look doesn’t know the sea. Only he who dives knows the sea. He takes risks. He forgets the sea in the sea. He dissolves in the unknown, as he might in a lover. Nothing to separate the blueness from the water. And there you seize upon a world that words can’t get hold of. It can’t be seen or touched except in the depths of the sea.
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982.
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sidereusimber · a month ago
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- Are you raving or dreaming?
- A little of this, a little of that
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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lowsodiumfreak · a month ago
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adonis, selected poems; “beginnings of the body, ends of the sea” // mahmoud darwish, from memory for forgetfulness: august, beirut, 1982
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xshayarsha · 6 months ago
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Because coffee, the first cup of coffee, is the mirror of the hand. And the hand that makes the coffee reveals the person that stirs it. Therefore, coffee is the public reading of the open book of the soul. And it is the enchantress that reveals whatever secrets the day will bring.
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982.
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luthienne · 3 months ago
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Something is missing from me. And I can't. I can't.
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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etherealxghostly · 27 days ago
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As Long as I'm dreaming, I'm alive. The dead don't dream.
~ Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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bennely · 27 days ago
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-Are you raving or dreaming?
-A little of this, a little of that.
Mahmoud Darwish, from Memory for Forgetfulness: August, Beirut, 1982 (tr. Ibrahim Muhawi)
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