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#mississippi
blackmalehair · a day ago
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Model IG: marquisdreshun
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thechanelmuse · a month ago
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Houma, Lafitte, Vacherie, and Port Fourchon are underwater as well due to Hurricane Ida. I’ve read some rescue tweets of people stating there’s a number of residents (one being a pregnant woman) who are trapped in their attics after trying to escape the rising water. There’s power outages in New Orleans and other Parishes. as well as some parts of Mississippi. 
All of this in the middle of a pandemic... 
I have friends in New Orleans that I haven’t heard from since yesterday. I’m hoping they received that alert that the electricity isn’t estimated to be returned until a month from now for New Orleans and other Parishes. Yes, a whole fucking month. However, the transmission tower is nonexistent at this point. 
From this:
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To this:
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Was the 30-day estimate for everyone to receive power before or after they seen this demolished structure? I can’t even wrap my head around this. Complete devastation from what they’re experiencing and the lack of media coverage. 
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referencees · a month ago
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Hey y’all, as a New Orleans resident I just wanna say two things about the horrible devastation that Hurricane Ida is going to cause:
1. Many people did not have the choice to evacuate. I was lucky enough to have somewhere to go, but the poorest and most vulnerable members of the New Orleans community often do not have the resources to leave. Instead of criticizing them for staying, please do what you can to help them in the aftermath.
2. New Orleans is going to receive a lot of attention in the aftermath of the storm, especially considering Ida hit on the 16th anniversary of Katrina. However, there are dozens of smaller communities in Louisiana who are going to experience exponentially more damage. Please keep in mind that thousands of people in southeastern Louisiana are going to lose their entire towns. They deserve as much attention and relief effort as New Orleans does, if not much much more.
I know many of us are simply exhausted after the last year and a half, but please keep in mind that so many people do not have the luxury not to care. If you see an opportunity to help, all I ask is that you do what you can. The only way we can get through this is together.
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shespsychedelic · a month ago
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I wanted to make a preemptive post about Hurricane Ida and the actual severity Louisiana and Mississippi are about to go through for the next 4 days.
For those who don’t know, hurricanes are measured on the Saffir-Simpson scale, which calculates the wind, rain, flooding, etc. of an approaching hurricane to estimate the amount of damage it will cause. The scale is based 1-5, with one being the least damage, and 5 being the most. Hurricane Camille, Hurricane Andrew, and Hurricane Katrina were all cat 5 hurricanes. The one I want to bring to attention though is Katrina, as most of the people who read this were probably alive and remember hearing about it when it happened.
Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on the 29 of August, 2005. When it was over the gulf, it was registered as a cat 5, but at landfall it was reduced to a cat 3. This is important because while the landfall category was a 3, the storm surge created in the Gulf was a product of a cat 5.
The reason I want to put this information out there is due to the fact that as of right now (9pm, Saturday, August 28, 2021) hurricane Ida is predicted to hit the coast of Louisiana and Mississippi as a cat 4, on August 29, exactly 16 years after Katrina made landfall and destroyed much of the coastline. While our region is equipped to handle hurricanes, these are still major catastrophic weather events, and will cause insane damage. Please please please keep us in mind over the next few days. Not only will there be major damage to the physical landscape and peoples homes, but the emotional trauma of having to relive the exact same situation (if not worse!) on the 16th anniversary of the most destructive hurricane in recorded history. As I come across resources, I’ll try to add them to this post, but I may lose service in the coming days (I know I’m going to lose power lol), I might not be able to, so if anyone knows of any places that could help please reblog this and add them! Any kind of resource would be incredible, but I really want to emphasize the importance of medical, mental health, insurance, and temporary housing.
While there are many groups and organizations that will already be helping the area (like the Cajun Navy, and FEMA), I really want to stress that out area still hasn’t ever really recovered from Katrina, or Gustav, or Laura, or any of the other hurricanes that have occurred since 2005, and especially now with Covid as bad as it is down here, it is going to be a long and slow road to recovery, so anything, even if it’s just you telling your neighbor about us, it would help so much.
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ladyfarona · a month ago
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Hurricane Ida is making landfall 16 years to the day we were hit with Katrina. That's really unnerving. If you could spare some positive thoughts, prayers, or good vibes for the people in the Gulf Coast area we'd appreciate it.
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crimson-vow · a month ago
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hey everyone - I wanted to take a moment to spread some awareness about Hurricane Ida and share ways to help the southeast United States.
my hometown and the surrounding region are currently experiencing one of the most catastrophic natural disasters we’ve seen in decades, apart from Hurricane Laura last year. storm surges, heavy rainfall, and 90+ mph winds are destroying infrastructure and have already left hundreds of thousands of people without power (which, for many, may not be restored for weeks or months). this storm developed so rapidly that many people had no time to plan an evacuation even if they could afford to, and it’s moving VERY slowly over the region, meaning that these torrential winds and rainfall will continue into the next day or longer. all of this compounded with the fact that hospitals are already overwhelmed due to COVID-19, the lack of air conditioning in the coming weeks will spell disaster for many, and the 16-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is today creates an incredibly bleak situation for residents of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and beyond.
if you are able to help, please consider donating to the Mutual Aid Disaster Relief fund, Imagine Water Works, or directly to those impacted seeking aid. DO NOT DONATE TO RED CROSS OR THE SALVATION ARMY. if you know of any other funds or individuals in need of donations, please reblog and add them to this post! if you’re unable to donate, that’s okay - please consider spreading the word regardless, because we desperately need your awareness and support. thank you for reading this far ♥️
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ifelllikeastar · 8 months ago
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Remembering ~ Mary Wilson
 Mary was an American singer and concert performer best known as a founding member of The Supremes at the age of 15. The Supremes were the most successful Motown act of the 1960s and the best-charting female group in U.S. history, as well as one of the all-time best-selling girl groups in the world. The group released a record-setting twelve number-one hit singles on the Billboard Hot 100, ten of which Wilson sang backing vocals for. In 1964, the Supremes recorded "Where Did Our Love Go" at Motown Studios in Detroit. The song would become the first of their five U.S. number-one singles. Born: Mary Wilson was born on March 6, 1944 in Greenville, Mississippi and died in her sleep on February 8, 2021 in Las Vegas, Nevada at the age of 76.
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mysharona1987 · a month ago
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I know all the stories from Reddit/nurses during covid19 are bad, but this one seems especially fucking bad.
Like, literally the thing that would turn you into John Wick or Cass from Promising Young Woman.
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politijohn · 7 months ago
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We’ve been at this for a year. No one will ever convince me that the Republicans who run these states are anything but intentional murderers of their most vulnerable residents. All in the name of capitalism.
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odditiesoflife · a year ago
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The Most Photographed Stone East of the Mississippi
Very near the Soudan Underground State Park administered by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is what some people call "the most photographed outcrop in the state." This is a pavement outcrop of folded banded iron formation. The outcrop consists of metallic hematite, red jasper and white chert. These originally horizontal layers have been folded multiple times. In some areas, the jasper and chert have fractures filled with milky quartz.
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americasgreatoutdoors · 4 months ago
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Alligators can live to be over 80 years old.  🐊  Which is why there’s an increased chance that they will in fact see you later.
Photo of gator at @usfws Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi courtesy of Kara R. (sharetheexperience.org) 
Photo description: An alligator suns itself on a log next to very calm reflective water. 
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archaeologicalnews · 6 months ago
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Mississippi returning Chickasaw remains
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JACKSON, Miss. — A man and a woman were found buried among wolf teeth and turtle shells. Other graves contained mothers and infants. Some tribal members were laid to rest with beloved dogs.
Over the past century, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History has stored the remains of hundreds of Native Americans who once inhabited the state. Most of the remains were found in the Mississippi Delta and range from 750 to 1,800 years old. For decades, they sat on shelves in the state’s collections.
Now, the remains of 403 Chickasaw ancestors along with various artifacts have been returned to their people to be laid to rest on Mississippi soil.
The initiative is the largest of its kind conducted by the state of Mississippi since the passage three decades ago of the federal Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Since 1990, the law has required that institutions like museums and schools that receive federal funding return human remains, funerary objects and other sacred items to their Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian descendants. Read more.
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southerngentry · 5 months ago
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