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#mosaics
escapekit · 6 months ago
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The Pavement Surgeon Lyon-based artist Ememem repairs holes in sidewalks and walls with colourful mosaics. Ememem’s first mosaic dates back 10 years when he found himself in a damaged alley in Lyon.
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cafeinevitable · 6 months ago
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Unseen for over 2000 years, archaeologists uncover a mosaic in Zeugma, Turkey.
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grocerystore-gf · 6 months ago
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Oscar Wilde, De Profundis // trend gallery // via @i-wrotethisforme // Jorge Louis Berges // via @smokeinsilence @viridianmasquerade //Jorge Louis Berges // Oghale Thomas Agboge// F. Scott Fitzgerald // AKR //
thank you @oscarwildeismyidol for helping me with this:)
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historieofbeafts · a year ago
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Taking a break from standard operating procedure to post some legitimately good historical art, because I felt like looking at fish mosaics from Pompeii and maybe you do too?
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These are both from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli collection [MANN 120177 & MANN 9997 respectively] and one of the coolest things about them (aside from the obvious appeal of fish mosaics) is that they were found in different houses despite the visual similarity.  I recommend checking out their wikimedia pages for higher-res images, because they’re even more impressive in close-up!
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geopsych · 22 days ago
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In late afternoon of that day in Portugal two years ago we visited the ancient Roman city of Conimbriga, as guessed by @torradeiraonfire . It’s still being excavated. We saw a water garden/atrium with fountains that can still be made to work, lots of beautiful mosaic floors whose colors were bright because they had been cleared of dust by the cold rains we were shivering in, other kinds of building foundations, and many fascinating ancient artifacts including beautiful glass.
I said, Roman things look so modern! And before our guide could answer, a member of our party who had studied Rome in school said, No, modern things look so Roman! And our guide laughed and nodded. That’s right! We still use so many Roman objects and designs without realizing that’s where they came from. We also saw Roman good luck charms, but this is a family-friendly blog. ;-)
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x-heesy · 6 months ago
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Ceramic Mosaics Mend Cracked Sidewalks, Potholes, and Buildings in Vibrant Interventions by Ememem
#iAminlove #somfpretty #mondaymotivation #thelittlethings #streetart #Ememem #Interventions #Vibrant #Buildings #Interventions #Potholes #Sidewalks #Cracked #Mend #Mosaics #Ceramic @marys_mystik #artposts #newcontemporary #thisiscolossal #contemporaryart #artinstallation #unique #thanksabunch
#nowplaying🎧 Londabaja by Binder & Krieglstein feat. Makki #Londabaja by #Binder & #Krieglstein feat. #Makki
https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2021/05/ememem-street-mosaics/
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Credits above ☝️
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archaeologicalnews · 2 months ago
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'Ancestor' of Mediterranean mosaics discovered in Turkey
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The discovery of a 3,500-year-old paving stone, described as the "ancestor" of Mediterranean mosaics, offers illuminating details into the daily lives of the mysterious Bronze Age Hittites.
The assembly of over 3,000 stones—in natural shades of beige, red and black, and arranged in triangles and curves—was unearthed in the remains of a 15th century BC Hittite temple, 700 years before the oldest known mosaics of ancient Greece.
"It is the ancestor of the classical period of mosaics that are obviously more sophisticated. This is a sort of first attempt to do it," says Anacleto D'Agostino, excavation director of Usakli Hoyuk, near Yozgat, in central Turkey. Read more.
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gemsofgreece · a month ago
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Relentless time
Cape Taenarum or Matapan, Laconia, Greece. Photo by lakonia_travel.gr
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alicerovai · 3 months ago
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Theodora from Ravenna’s mosaics 💙
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blueiskewl · 7 days ago
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2,000-Year-Old Mosaics Uncovered In Zeugma Turkey Before Being Lost To Flooding
It wasn’t good policy that saved ancient Zeugma. It was a good story. In 2000, the construction of the massive Birecik Dam on the Euphrates River, less than a mile from the site, began to flood the entire area in southern Turkey. 
Immediately, a ticking time-bomb narrative of the waters, which were rising an average of four inches per day for six months, brought Zeugma and its plight global fame. The water, which soon would engulf the archaeological remains, also brought increasing urgency to salvage efforts and emergency excavations that had already been taking place at the site, located about 500 miles from Istanbul, for almost a year. The media attention Zeugma received attracted generous aid from both private and government sources. Of particular concern was the removal of Zeugma’s mosaics, some of the most extraordinary examples to survive from the ancient world. Soon the world’s top restorers arrived from Italy to rescue them from the floodwaters. The focus on Zeugma also brought great numbers of international tourists—and even more money—a trend that continues today with the opening in September 2011 of the ultramodern $30 million Zeugma Mosaic Museum in the nearby city of Gaziantep.
But Zeugma’s story begins millennia before the dam was constructed. In the third century B.C., Seleucus I Nicator (“the Victor”), one of Alexander the Great’s commanders, established a settlement he called Seleucia, probably a katoikia, or military colony, on the western side of the river. On its eastern bank, he founded another town he called Apamea after his Persian-born wife. The two cities were physically connected by a pontoon bridge, but it is not known whether they were administered by separate municipal governments, and nothing of ancient Apamea, nor the bridge, survives. In 64 B.C., the Romans conquered Seleucia, renaming the town Zeugma, which means “bridge” or “crossing” in ancient Greek. After the collapse of the Seleucid Empire, the Romans added Zeugma to the lands of Antiochus I Theos of Commagene as a reward for his support of General Pompey during the conquest.
Throughout the imperial period, two Roman legions were based at Zeugma, increasing its strategic value and adding to its cosmopolitan culture. Due to the high volume of road traffic and its geographic position, Zeugma became a collection point for road tolls. Political and trade routes converged here and the city was the last stop in the Greco-Roman world before crossing over to the Persian Empire. For hundreds of years Zeugma prospered as a major commercial city as well as a military and religious center, eventually reaching its peak population of about 20,000–30,000 inhabitants. During the imperial period, Zeugma became the empire’s largest, and most strategically and economically important, eastern border city.
However, the good times in Zeugma declined along with the fortunes of the Roman Empire. After the Sassanids from Persia attacked the city in A.D. 253, its luxurious villas were reduced to ruins and used as shelters for animals. The city’s new inhabitants were mainly rural people who employed only simple building materials that did not survive. Zeugma’s grandeur and importance would remain forgotten for more than 1,700 years.
By Matthew Brunwasser.
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nncastle · 3 months ago
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June 22, 2021 :: I had visited Pompeii three times, but never Herculaneum. This time I made it a priority to stop at this ongoing excavation site. Recent discoveries have unearthed ancient fast food joints and loads of skeletons in the cellars. At first archaeologists thought people had escaped, but it turns out that they hid in the cellars where many were robbed. Yes, you heard that right. Evidence suggests that thugs barricaded basement doors and let in fleeing families only when they gave over their money and jewels. Humans!!! * eyeroll * 
Either way, they all died together, clutching their wealth. I was shocked to discover that jewelry actually survived as did wood! Many of the houses have their original wooden doors, shelves, furniture, and beams. Herculaneum is more intimate than Pompeii. Seeing the deposits of tufa up close with Vesuvius and the modern city looming above was something else. One day the modern buildings will be buried too. This is what happens in the shadow of volcanoes.
I especially loved the mosaics that remain in many of the outdoor courtyards. In a blacksmith shop a candelabra he was fixing was found along with all of his tools. The people in this city were not as well off as in Pompeii and signs of their work and daily lives are everywhere. The baths were stunning with locker rooms for both men and women. 
I wish the heat hadn’t been so insufferable when we were there. I truly picked the worst week to travel to Italy...but we trudged on. 
I took sooo many pictures! I may post some for FREE download on Pixabay at some point. 
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Like the nearby city of Pompeii, Herculaneum is famous as one of the few ancient cities to be preserved more or less intact, with no later accretions or modifications. The thick layer of ash that blanketed the town also protected it against looting and the elements. Unlike Pompeii, the mainly pyroclastic material that covered Herculaneum carbonized and preserved more wood in objects such as roofs, beds, and doors, as well as other organic-based materials such as food and papyrus.The traditional story is that the city was rediscovered by chance in 1709, during the digging of a well. Remnants of the city, however, were already found during earlier earthworks. In the first years after its rediscovery, tunnels were dug at the site by treasure hunters, and many artifacts were removed. Regular excavations began in 1738, and have continued ever since, albeit intermittently. Today, only part of the ancient site has been excavated, and attention and funds have shifted to the preservation of the already excavated parts of the city, rather than focusing on uncovering more areas.
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During the pandemic, there have been many reports of looting and graffiti on the site. Quite sad. 
All images ©2021 Narcisse Navarre. Do not use without my permission.
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lychens · 6 months ago
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cafeinevitable · 7 months ago
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Extraordinarily detailed and dynamic black-and-white mosaics from the Baths of Neptune in Ostica Antica, the port for ancient Rome.
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my-russia · 5 months ago
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Soviet mosaics in Murmansk
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ozgurhayalim · 2 months ago
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   Beşparmak Dağları ya da antik ismiyle Latmos eteklerinde puslu ama güneşli bir gün... Keşişlerin odasından Bafa Gölü huzurlarınızda... Göl çevresinde başta Herakleia olmak üzere pek çok Antik kalıntılar - özellikle manastırlar-, figürler bulunmaktadır. Dağ eteklerinde bulunan, Yediler Manastırı günümüzde korunmadan, yani doğal olarak ayakta kalabilen nadir yapılardan... Antik dönemde Yukarı Mısır'dan - Sina Yarımadası-  göç eden keşişlerin mabedidir. Kayalarla çevrili küçük odaları görüyorsunuz. Son olarak İsa'nın yaşam süreci betimleyen figürler bulunmaktadır... Enfes kayaları, dağ yamaçları ve toprak yapısına sahip doğa kesidi...
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twofacedgods · 2 months ago
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The Verulamium Museum, St Albans
Among the green pastures and crooked roads of modern–day St Albans can be found the relics of Verulamium, city of Roman Britain some two thousand years past. The ruins of knapped flint walls emerge from the cropped grass of Verulamium Park; a ways away is a Roman hypocaust, still intact; a little further still an amphitheatre, rubbled by weather and time. Most striking to me, though, were the mosaics: the Titan Oceanus, the Shell, the Lion and the Stag – all with still–bright tesserae of terracotta and grey and cream. 
September, 2021
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archaeologicalnews · 3 months ago
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Byzantine church dedicated to unknown martyr unearthed in Israel
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Archaeologists have discovered a 1,500-year-old church in Israel dedicated to an unknown martyr that had animal mosaics that had been erased. The sizable church has Greek inscriptions that say that it was dedicated to a "glorious martyr" but doesn't say who this martyr was.
At the time the church was built, the Byzantine Empire controlled Israel, and an inscription in the church states that the church was expanded during the reign of Emperor Flavius Tiberius, who ruled from 578 to 582. Israel and neighboring areas were conquered by the Islamic Rashidun Caliphate between 634 and 638. But despite the growth of Islam in the area the church flourished, and it was not abandoned until the 10th century, archaeologists found.
The church was found during excavations carried out in 2017, before construction took place in the area. Read more.
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lemysteredescathedrales · 2 months ago
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Mosaic from the House of Orion, discovered in the Region V excavations (Pompeii), 2018
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mckitterick · 5 months ago
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backyard mosaic ideas
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oooh, posting to share lots of great ideas, found mostly here (and on pins): X
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