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justlgbtthings · 2 months ago
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me, an autonomous adult in college: *looks up tips for managing adhd on a deadline*
every single result: AS A PARENT to help YOUR CHILD WITH ADHD monitor YOUR CHILD'S behavior and reward HIM for doing work because CHILDREN WITH ADHD need constant support-
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captainstrawbery · 7 months ago
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omoerotismo · a month ago
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this one is for the neurodivergents
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honeyhemlocked · 5 months ago
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people don’t talk enough about the weird grief that will randomly hit you when you have ADHD. for a good stretch of time I am so happy that I have answers about why I am the way that I am, and then I’m hit with an avalanche of “I don’t know how to do this” and “fuck, this is the way that I am, there is no cure.”
I genuinely believe that folks like me are bright and intelligent and passionate and creative and to be celebrated. this week though I just feel like shit that I can’t think “normally”. I’m struggling to make money and I’m frustrated because I know that I could bring so much to the table if I could “apply myself” the way that NTs can. I’m trying so hard, and the rejection is painful.
my head feels full of static. I have all of this energy in my body but I can’t move. I’m a musician and a birth worker and a writer and creator. I know this. just today I feel like I’m not much at all if I can’t do anything with that information.
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adhdtho · 6 months ago
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a few of my adhd symptoms and experiences as john mulaney quotes because ?? yes ??
1) RSD
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2) Executive dysfunction or “I’m Going To Do This”
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3) Infodumping
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4) Having trouble sitting alone with nothing to do because it will make me overthink myself into a bad mood
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5) Extreme impatience
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6) Auditory processing issues
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7) Emotional dysregulation
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8) Impulsivity
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9) Memory loss, misplacing things, just forgetting everything man
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10) And last but not least the great experience of telling someone you have ADHD but they have no idea what the disorder really means so all they hear is:
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justlgbtthings · 3 months ago
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i got a New Planner which means that i will suddenly and miraculously become organized despite this technique never having worked in the past
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purplespaceace · 4 months ago
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very few characters actually have adhd in media, and when they do, what people mean by that is just that they fidget a lot, not that they have adhd. the only character with adhd I can think of where I’ve watched/read it and I’ve gone, “oh, this character actually has adhd” is Jake peralta from Brooklyn 99. so, here’s my take on how to write adhd, with examples from Brooklyn 99.
I’ll do the best I can to separate them into three categories; the three things people look for in adults with ADHD, which are rejection sensitivity dysphoria, an interest-based nervous system, and emotional hyperarousal.
I’ll also randomly bold and italicize bits so people with ADHD can actually read it.
Rejection Sensitivity Dysphoria, or RSD
Rejection sensitivity dysphoria makes people with ADHD overly sensitive to criticism, even if they perceive a rejection and there actually isn’t one. Their emotions are also very strong generally. Because of RSD, people with ADHD become people-pleasers and can develop anxiety because they’re so eager to please.
For me, RSD makes me cry an embarrassing amount for any little reason. in your writing, make your characters overdramatic, criers, and/or people-pleasers. They’ll have trouble saying no. They may also be over competitive, as their perceived rejection may include losing.
how does Jake show this in b99? When Jake comes up with a catchphrase and Rosa says it’s terrible, jake is far more hurt than he should be. He hates losing, and he gets overly upset whenever someone says they don’t like him or don’t trust him, etc. he’s also a people pleaser who has trouble saying no.
An interest-based nervous system
An interest-based nervous system includes hyperfocuses and an inability to pay attention. It stems from the fact that we can’t make as much dopamine as neurotypicals. This means that while neurotypicals get dopamine after completing a task, people with ADHD don’t. That means that people with ADHD don’t have any reason to do tasks, especially those they don’t like. This leads to executive dysfunction—people with ADHD will know they have to or want to do something, but they can’t seem to do it. people with ADHD hyperfocus on things that bring them dopamine. I was obsessed with warrior cats for three years. But hyperfocuses can also last a short amount of time—I’ll have a drawing idea in the middle of class and won’t be able to concentrate on anything else before I finish it. this is where our impulsiveness comes from. we can leap into things we think will give us dopamine without thinking, which can lead to injury. We also tend to tell people personal things they don’t want to hear because of this, and don’t have very good boundaries. We sometimes say whatever comes into our head, which can also result in us being rude on accident. Our voices can also get very loud or we can interrupt people frequently because we’re so impulsive. When people with ADHD hyperfocus, they can forget about anything else. I’ll forget to eat if I’m busy reading a Wikipedia article about feminism in the 1850s, and won’t go to the bathroom or drink water either. It’s also important to note that taking away distractions doesn’t help, because we can do things like pick at our skin and daydream—something that people with ADHD do a lot of. Because of executive dysfunction, people can call people with ADHD lazy or irresponsible.
people with ADHD can also be extremely indecisive because ADHD affects our executive functioning, and making decisions requires planning and prioritizing, and task initiation, which are both executive functions!
people with ADHD also have poor memory for important things, but tend to remember random bits of trivia. Poor memory leads to object permanence problems, which means people with ADHD can forget to call a friend back for weeks, forget that they need to read library books in a closed cabinet, or forget that the vegetables they got will go bad. People can sometimes say that people with ADHD don’t care about anything because of this.
people with ADHD can also be prone to depression because of under or overstimulation. Boredom feels painful for people with ADHD. If we’re overstimulated, we can experience sensory overload—if things are too bright or too loud, if too many things are touching us at once—often it’s not because the thing is too intense, but because too many things are happening at once.
We also have something some people call dolphin brain, where we jump from one thing to another. From the outside, it looks really random, but I find that when I’m talking to another neurodivergent communication is generally easier. For instance, someone with ADHD might see a bee at a baseball field and tell their team about the time they saw whales at seaworld because their little brother was also stung by a wasp there. people will see no connection on the outside, but it makes perfect sense to the person with ADHD.
people with ADHD can also be overachievers, either because they hyperfocus on schoolwork or their RSD makes it so that failing at something isn’t an option. people with ADHD can also be very controlling and stubborn, probably because we hyperfocus on something and cant handle it being any different, and any change to our plans can be seen as rejection.
we can also have a hard time ordering our thoughts or doing stuff like math in our head. a lot of the time I number my thoughts like, 1. this reason, 2. this reason, etc. even if theres only two or sometimes I just need the 1. as a transition for my brain. when I don’t write it down or organize it like that it feels like I’m trying to grasp ropes that have been covered in oil (it’s not going to happen) and then my brain gets all jumbled and I have to restart at the beginning. this is probably just me, but it feels the same way when I’m reading long paragraphs of something uninteresting, or even short bits of historical documents because the way they phrase things is really pompous and hard to process.
also, stuff like caffeine calms us down and helps us focus. people who don’t take medication (me) often drink coffee or caffeinated sodas to focus.
another random tip, but if your character with ADHD also is genderfluid or genderflux, they might have a hard time figuring out their gender sometimes, because we can be known to have a hard time putting our feelings into words or our brains will just go, “nope, not thinking about that right now” and move on, which can be pretty frustrating.
people with adhd also have a trait called time blindness, where we have no idea how long something takes and therefore can’t manage our time very well. this often results in us being late or just sitting around the house because we got ready way too early.
we also have something called consequence blindness—we do things and are completely unaware of the consequences. if I don’t brush my teeth, I get cavities. but I don’t think about that when I’m deciding I’m too tired to brush my teeth.
in b99, jake regularly stays up all night solving cases and watches documentaries on random topics. He’s also very distractible—when they’re trying to find the person who sent Captain Holt death threats in the train yard, Jake says he and captain holt should take a train trip together sometime. Jake says that he’ll forget Amy if they don't work together because he’s like a goldfish.
Emotional hyperarousal
This is the only thing people tend to include when writing characters: the fidgeting. People with ADHD tend to need more stimulation than others, so we’ll do things like draw during class and chew on pens.
people with ADHD can also have apd, or auditory processing disorder. we tend to watch shows with subtitles on and may take a second to process what you’re saying, or hear it wrong. The subtitles thing may be partially do to creating just the right amount of stimulation, but if I don’t have subtitles, me and my other friends with ADHD will watch tv with the volume turned up very high. People with ADHD also can have a hard time interpreting other people‘s tone and have a hard time controlling their own. They can be bad at social cues and have poor manners because we don’t pick up on that stuff.
people with ADHD also tend to observe everything or nothing at any given time, mostly based on the amount of stimulation they have—if they dont have a lot in their main task, they’ll need to take in something else at the same time. Likewise, if I’m hyperfocusing on something I often don’t notice anything else, like if someone asks me a question.
in b99, Jake fidgets with things a lot. In the intro, he’s picking up and examining a figurine on his desk, likely because he was bored with paperwork or some other task.
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spettrocoli · 3 months ago
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IF YOU'RE NOT AUTISTIC PLEASE READ
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"Autism is a Spectrum" Doesn't Mean What You Think
This is the link she included in the thread.
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miss-styles · 3 months ago
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→ Unseen footage of Harry playing a guitar in 2015!
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Autism is so wild because I'll have a special interest and form my entire daily existence around it and think, like, "I think I will always be interested in this. I can imagine myself being this passionately into this thing ten years from now" and then boom, two weeks after that thought I've done it all over again with something different. This happens approximately every year or two, and yet I still always feel the same false sense of permanence
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parotcardsroxy · 4 months ago
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hi fyi, if you don’t support people with low/no empathy, unfollow me.
people with low/no empathy are not:
monsters
terrible people
incapable of being sympathetic
incapable of being compassionate
incapable of being nice
punchlines to a joke
people with low/no empathy are:
deserving of love
human beings
capable of holding a stable, healthy relationship
just as valuable to the world as empaths are (many surgeons and er doctors have low/no empathy!)
we are just as human and as deserving of love as anyone else. we’re not something to be afraid of - we still have morals and a value for life.
we do not deserve to be demonized as we are.
affective empathy (the kind we can’t feel) is the ability to share feelings with others. for example, if your friend was anxious, you could become anxious through seeing them anxious. those of us born with low/no empathy have no control over it and cannot change this (no matter how much one may want to!)
cognitive empathy (the kind we can feel) is the ability to understand others’ feelings. for example, if your friend was anxious, you would be able to understand what they’re going through, even if you’re not necessarily feeling anxious through them.
compassion is concern and pity for others. for example, if your friend was anxious, you would feel bad for them and want to help as a result.
a post that explains it with more simple and easy to understand format
low/no empathy people can be sympathetic and compassionate. it’s not a bad thing to have low/no empathy - again, some of the most crucial occupations are dominated by low/no empathy people, as they can handle messy situations better than many empaths. first responders, surgeons, trauma doctors, morticians, to name a few.
it’s okay if you’re empathetic and this is the first positivity you’re seeing about this! i was the same way for a long time, i thought no/low empathy people were scary because i didn’t realize i was one of them. you don’t have to be perfect, you can still be learning, all that matters is that you try!
low/no empathy people are not something to be afraid of. we are not monsters. unfollow me if you don’t support low/no empathy people.
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disabled-kain · a month ago
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I realized why I hate phone calls so much (aside from social anxiety).
It's a sudden interruption of my routine. An unexpected social obligation that I'm not ready for. I often don't know what that person is contacting me for, I don't have a standard social script prepared, and I don't have enough time to shift into socializing mode before the phone stops ringing.
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