Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#nunyas news
nunyabizni · 2 days ago
Text
CNN's chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta admitted to podcast host Joe Rogan Wednesday that it was improper for the network to claim Rogan took "horse dewormer" as a COVID treatment.
On Wednesday's installment of "The Joe Rogan Experience," Rogan grilled the doctor on why someone like him who already had COVID and has antibodies should get vaccinated.
"By the way, I'm glad you're better," Gupta said.
"Thank you," Rogan responded. "You're probably the only one at CNN who's glad … The rest of them are all lying about me taking horse medication."
JOE ROGAN BLASTS MEDIA LIES ABOUT HIS COVID TREATMENT: ‘DO I HAVE TO SUE CNN?’
"That bothered you," Gupta said, grinning.
"It should bother you too," Rogan shot back. "They're lying at your network about people taking human drugs versus drugs for veterinary."
"Calling it a ‘horse dewormer’ is not the most flattering thing, I get that," Gupta conceded.
"It's a lie," Rogan pushed back. "It's a lie on a news network … and it's a lie that they're conscious of. It's not a mistake. They're unfavorably framing it as veterinary medicine."
Gupta pointed to the "snarky" statement released by the FDA saying, "You are not a horse. You are not a cow," in order to encourage people to not take ivermectin, but Rogan remained persistent on calling out CNN's coverage of a drug that's been "given out to billions and billions of people" and resulted in a Nobel Prize.
"Why would they lie and say that's horse dewormer?" Rogan asked. "I can afford people medicine motherf---er. It's ridiculous! It's just a lie! Don't you think that a lie like that is dangerous on a news network when you know that they know they're lying? … Do you think that that's a problem that your news network lies?"
"What did they say?" Gupta asked.
The podcast host first told Gupta that his ivermectin was "prescribed to me by a doctor," forciverng the CNN correspondent to say the drug "shouldn't be called" horse dewormer.
JOE ROGAN TORCHES CNN'S BRIAN STELTER: ‘HEY MOTHERF---ER, YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO BE A JOURNALIST'
"Does it bother you that the network you work for out and out lied, just outright lied about me taking horse dewormer?" Rogan grilled Gupta.
"They shouldn't have said that," Gupta admitted.
"Why did they do that?" Rogan asked.
"I don't know," Gupta responded.
"You didn't ask? You're the medical guy over there!" Rogan exclaimed.
"I didn't ask," Gupta said. "I should've asked before coming on this podcast."
Gupta denied Rogan's claim that CNN made the claims with "such glee" before playing a clip of "OutFront" anchor Erin Burnett calling ivermectin a "livestock drug."
"I don't think Erin had glee," Gupta reacted.
"Well, it's more Brian Stelter who was the gleeful one," Rogan replied, referring to CNN's left-wing media guru. "The point is that's a lie."
"It can be used for humans! I get it," Gupta said.
"Not just could be used for humans, is often used for humans along with all the other drugs that I took. All human drugs," the podcast host said. "They know it's a human drug and they lied. It's defamatory."
"Yeah, they shouldn't have done that," Gupta reiterated. "I don't know if it's defamatory."
"I bet it is," Rogan asserted. "It's a lie."
Rogan went on to knock CNN for not reporting how he tested negative "five days later" and "felt great" following his treatment.
"My point is you're working for a news organization. If they're lying about a comedian taking horse medication, what are they telling us about Russia? What are they telling us about Syria? Do you understand that that's why people get concerned about the veracity of the news?" Rogan pressed Gupta before the CNN correspondent, again, conceded he did not take a horse dewormer.
331 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 days ago
Text
Katie Couric is facing intense backlash over a stunning admission in her book about a 2016 interview she conducted with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
In her tell-all memoir "Going There," Couric detailed how Ginsburg was critical of national anthem kneelers in the midst of the furor over former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to take a knee to protest police brutality. Several other professional athletes began to take his lead and kneel instead of standing during the anthem.
Ginsburg told Couric she was opposed to the action, saying those who kneel during the anthem were showing "contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life," according to new reporting by the Daily Mail.
KATIE COURIC ADMITS SHE ‘PROTECTED’ RUTH BADER GINSBURG BY EDITING OUT DISPARAGING REMARKS ON ANTHEM KNEELERS
Couric said she was "conflicted" about including the justice's comment because she was a "big RBG fan" and admitted to seeking advice from some fellow journalists about what to do. Ultimately, the story she wrote for Yahoo! News did include quotes from Ginsburg saying kneelers were "dumb and disrespectful," but left out the above remarks.
Couric wrote she wanted to "protect" Ginsburg, who died last year, and also suggested Ginsburg's office had some influence on the final product, according to the Mail.
The iconic TV personality was blasted on social media for lacking journalistic ethics.
"This is toxic on a lot of levels," New York Times correspondent Maggie Haberman reacted.
"This is not the role of a journalist…." Daily Mail columnist Meghan McCain wrote. "You can’t complain about distrust in the media when one of the most famous interviewers admits to rigging interviews to make liberals look good. I now have even more questions about her ethics in regards to interviewing conservatives."
"I too always like to omit the most newsworthy and interesting parts from all my interviews with important and powerful people," reporter Ben Jacobs sarcastically tweeted.
"Completely indefensible for Katie Couric to withhold this from the public to protect a *sitting Supreme Court Justice*," New Republic columnist Natalie Shure scolded the veteran anchor.
KATIE COURIC RIPS RIVAL DIANE SAWYER IN NEW TELL-ALL BOOK
"Please allow Katie Couric to keep telling on herself and others," BuzzFeed News reporter Sarah Mimms quipped.
"The galaxy-level arrogance it must've taken to think that RBG needed protection from herself," Media Research Center's Jorge Bonilla wrote.
"I've said this many times when discussing media bias, but bears repeating: The big question is often not what you see they're doing, but what they're hiding from you," RealClearInvestigations senior writer Mark Hemingway warned.
"You can learn a lot about where the left has moved by looking at how they choose to edit or rewrite RBG," Substack journalist and "Honestly" podcast host Bari Weiss pointed out.
"Very, very, very bad," Reason's Robby Soave wrote.
The iconic TV personality was blasted on social media for lacking journalistic ethics.
"This is toxic on a lot of levels," New York Times correspondent Maggie Haberman reacted.
"This is not the role of a journalist…." Daily Mail columnist Meghan McCain wrote. "You can’t complain about distrust in the media when one of the most famous interviewers admits to rigging interviews to make liberals look good. I now have even more questions about her ethics in regards to interviewing conservatives."
"I too always like to omit the most newsworthy and interesting parts from all my interviews with important and powerful people," reporter Ben Jacobs sarcastically tweeted.
"Completely indefensible for Katie Couric to withhold this from the public to protect a *sitting Supreme Court Justice*," New Republic columnist Natalie Shure scolded the veteran anchor.
KATIE COURIC RIPS RIVAL DIANE SAWYER IN NEW TELL-ALL BOOK
"Please allow Katie Couric to keep telling on herself and others," BuzzFeed News reporter Sarah Mimms quipped.
"The galaxy-level arrogance it must've taken to think that RBG needed protection from herself," Media Research Center's Jorge Bonilla wrote.
"I've said this many times when discussing media bias, but bears repeating: The big question is often not what you see they're doing, but what they're hiding from you," RealClearInvestigations senior writer Mark Hemingway warned.
"You can learn a lot about where the left has moved by looking at how they choose to edit or rewrite RBG," Substack journalist and "Honestly" podcast host Bari Weiss pointed out.
"Very, very, very bad," Reason's Robby Soave wrote.
The RBG revelation was one of a few bombshells from Couric's memoir. Other excerpts from the book show Couric taking hits at fellow female journalists.
Couric accused ABC's Diane Sawyer of exploiting the late Whitney Houston in their infamous interview in 2002. Couric, who always competed with Sawyer for interviews, also wondered what the ABC journalist did to score some of her high-profile interviews.
59 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a day ago
Text
By Natalie Dreier, Cox Media Group National Content Desk
Larry Miller, the former president of the Portland Trail Blazers, current Nike and Jordan brand chairman, has a secret he has kept from some of his closest friends, even Michael Jordan himself.
Miller said he committed a murder when he was a member of a gang in Philadelphia during his teenage years.
He sat down with Sports Illustrated for an exclusive interview before the release of his tell-all book “Jump: My Secret Journey From the Streets to the Boardroom,” which will be released next year.
During the interview, Miller, now 72 years old, shared that he spent time in prison after shooting and killing a person when he was 16 in 1965.
He kept the secret from not only Jordan but also Nike founder Phil Knight, NBA executives and his own children until recently.
Miller said he did not know 18-year-old Edward White when he fired a .38-caliber gun into his chest, killing him.
”That’s what makes it even more difficult for me, because it was for no reason at all,” Miller told Sports Illustrated. “I mean, there was no valid reason for this to happen. And that’s the thing I really struggle with and that’s — you know, it’s the thing that I think about every day. It’s like, I did this, and to someone who — it was no reason to do it. And that’s the part that really bothers me.”
He said he shot White after a friend had been stabbed to death during a fight with a rival gang. After drinking a bottle of wine and getting the gun he had received from his girlfriend before that night, the group went looking for anyone from the rival gang, shooting the first person they found, he told Sports Illustrated.
He admitted he was drunk at the time and realized what he had done once the “haze” lifted.
Miller, who had been a good student before joining the gang, went back to school while in prison. He earned an accounting degree from Temple University at the age of 30 about the same time he was released.
He had been interviewing with the accounting firm Arthur Andersen for a job but during his final interview, he disclosed his past, moments before he was going to be offered a job. That job offer didn’t happen. So he decided not to share his past from that moment forward, he told Sports Illustrated.
To read more about Miller and how he became the man he is today, click here. ______________
He does know there's no statute of limitations on murder and that he just confessed to one right?
48 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 days ago
Text
More than 500 pages of internal documents from DC Metropolitan Police concerning the fatal shooting of Ashli Babbitt in the Capitol on Jan. 6 reveal witness accounts stating she was not holding a weapon at the time of her death and how "upset" the officer was after shooting her.
"These previously secret records show there was no good reason to shoot and kill Ashli Babbitt," stated Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, which obtained the documents through a May 2021 FOIA lawsuit. "The Biden-Garland Justice Department and the Pelosi Congress have much to answer for the over the mishandling and cover-up of this scandalous killing of an American citizen by the U.S. Capitol Police."
Babbitt, an Air Force veteran, was shot and killed during the storming of the Capitol by a bullet fired by Capitol Police officer ​​Lt. Michael Byrd. The documents from the DC Metropolitan Police department show that witnesses did not see Babbitt holding a weapon prior to her being shot, and reveal conflicting accounts of whether Byrd verbally warned Babbitt before shooting her.
OFFICER WHO SHOT ASHLI BABBITT GIVES FIRST PUBLIC INTERVIEW TO NBC NEWS
A Capitol Police sergeant, whose name is redacted, described seeing Babbitt climbing through a broken window, but did not witness her holding a weapon, according to a portion of the documents received by Judicial Watch.
"Sergeant [redacted] observed a white, female protester was climbing through an opened area where the glass pane had been knocked out. He heard a gunshot and this female fell backwards through the opening. The crowd on the other side of the barricaded east doors, began to step back and some put their hands in the air. Sergeant [redacted] observed Lieutenant Byrd step back just after hearing the gunshot. He did not see anything in the female protester’s hands prior to the gunshot," the Internal Affairs Division report stated.
"Sergeant [redacted] never went on the other side of the barricaded east door. He also did not know that it was Lieutenant Byrd who shot his gun until he talked to him moments after it occurred. Lieutenant Byrd looked upset and stated, ‘I was the one who took the shot,’" the report continued.
Judicial Watch noted that in a written transcript of the interview with the sergeant, he detailed he was not sure "if something happened to" Byrd that "caused him to take the shot or not."
"Uh, I saw Lieutenant Byrd kinda. I don’t know if it was before or after. Cause I was trying to figure this out of, but there was at one point where I remember seeing him and he kind of went like this and then came back up again. Uh, I don’t know if that was from him taking the shot and then stepping back from that shot or if it was before that, I can’t, no matter how I tried to rack my brain, I can’t, I can’t figure out when that happened, but uh, so I don’t know if something happened to him where [sic] caused him to take the shot or not," the written transcript states.
CAPITOL POLICE OFFICERS SUE TRUMP, ALLIES OVER JAN. 6 RIOT 
The sergeant went onto describe that Byrd was "visibly upset" after shooting Babbitt.
"No, his eyes were red. He was, you could see he was visibly upset and he just, you know, kind of comfort him and told him, you know, we gotta get outta here," the transcript of the interview states.
The interviewer asked the sergeant if he approached Babbitt after the shot, and he responded, "No, no, no. I maintained my position."
He added that Byrd directed him and other officers to go down "into the subway" following the shooting.
The interviewer also asked: "This was not a typical day, was it?"
"Definitely not my craziest day there," the sergeant replied, saying the closest event to compare it to was "the shots fired back in 2004, 2005 in the Rayburn building ...."
The interview asked the sergeant if Jan. 6 was  a "frightening experience," to which the sergeant responded: "Oh yeah. I’m not afraid to say I was, I was scared s--t."
The Internal Affairs Division also conducted a different interview with another Capitol Police officer on Jan. 6, who was positioned directly behind Byrd in the Speaker’s Lobby during the shooting of Babbitt.
"He did not see Ms. McEntee [Babbitt] in possession of any potential weapons," the summary report states.
"He reiterated that he did not observe that she was armed."
That interviewee also described Byrd as "upset" following the shooting.
"Lieutenant Byrd was shaking, he did not say anything…. Byrd was nervous, teary-eyed, and appeared very upset. His voice [was] also shaky when he called for medical assistance over the radio. Lieutenant Byrd was still very upset," the report continued.
That interviewee also said that a man with a beard wearing a suit attended to Babbitt, according to transcripts of the interview. Neither he nor the sergeant interviewed were able to prove the identity of the bearded man in the suit, but said they believe he was with the House Sergeant-at-Arms office.
Yet another report also stated that a sergeant did not see a weapon in Babbitt’s hands before hearing a gunshot. That report added that investigators "recovered 'a para force’ folding knife in Ms. Babbitt’s pants pocket."
"The crowd on the outside of the previously barricaded east doors began to step back, and some raised their hands in the air. Sergeant [redacted] did not see anything in Ms. Babbitt’s hands prior to hearing the gunshot."
Another report on an interview with a Capitol Police officer on Feb. 4 stated, "He did not hear any verbal commands" before Babbitt was shot.
A separate Jan. 6 phone interview with a man who "reached out" to the Metro PD, who claimed to have been in the House Chambers at the time of the shooting, contradicted the officer’s Feb. 4 interview.
He said he did in fact hear Byrd shout "loud verbal commands" that he would "shoot" before firing at Babbitt. That interviewee also claimed Byrd fired twice, not once.
"He was yelling, he was giving commands. Um, he was saying, I will shoot. Uh, he was saying some other stuff. I couldn’t clearly make out what he was saying, but he was definitely, uh, giving commands, no question about it," the interviewee said, according to transcripts.
"He [Byrd], uh, did everything he could do…. He was by himself, we were defending the front door and they were shaking it."
A DC Department of Forensic Sciences crime scene examination report also noted that Byrd’s service weapon was turned over to the department. A crime scene examination report also states that police saw a trail of blood from the hallway outside the Speaker’s Lobby doors, that led down to the first floor of the House.
The documents come after Byrd gave his first public interview in August, recounting the events leading up to the shooting, and said firing his weapon was a "last resort option."
"I tried to wait as long as I could," Byrd said. "I hoped and prayed no one tried to enter through those doors. But their failure to comply required me to take the appropriate action to save the lives of members of Congress and myself and my fellow officers."
The U.S. Capitol Police concluded its internal investigation seven months after the shooting and declared it was "lawful and within Department policy." The policy states that the officer can use deadly force if he "reasonably believes that the action is in defense of human life."
"If the doors were breached, the rioters would have immediate access to the House Chambers," the U.S. Capitol Police said on August 23. "The actions of the officer in this case potentially saved Members and staff from serious injury and possible death from a large crowd of rioters who forced their way into the U.S. Capitol and to the House Chamber where Members and staff were steps away."
"I know that day I saved countless lives," Byrd said in his interview. "I know members of Congress, as well as my fellow officers and staff, were in jeopardy and in serious danger. And that’s my job."
42 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a day ago
Text
Pupils in schools across France on Friday paid tribute to Samuel Paty, a year after the teacher was beheaded by an extremist for showing his class cartoons of the Muslim Prophet Mohammed.
Paty’s violent death sent shockwaves through France and beyond, and was seen as an attack on the core values drilled by teachers into generations of schoolchildren, including the separation of church and state and the right to blaspheme.
The 47-year-old was killed after leaving the middle school where he taught history and geography in the tranquil Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine on the evening of October 16, 2020.
His killer, 18-year-old Chechen refugee Abdullakh Anzorov, claimed the attack as revenge for Paty showing his class the drawings in a lesson on free speech.
The government encouraged all French schools to commemorate the murder with a minute of silence, debates or the screening of documentaries on the freedom of speech.
“We will not forget Samuel Paty,” Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer said Friday during a visit to a Paris high school.
“By naming rooms, schools and other establishments after him, and by holding ceremonies like this one, we show those who would terrorise us and who would use fear to fight freedom, that we will use freedom to fight fear,” he said.
– ‘Show respect’ –
In Villeneuve-d’Ascq, near the northern city of Lille, high school students dedicated their civics class Friday morning to a discussion.
“What does freedom of expression mean to you?” history and geography teacher Anne-Sophie Branque asked her class of mostly 15-year olds.
“Do you feel free to express yourselves in daily life without hurting others? Do we have the right to blaspheme?”
Correcting one student who said that “Samuel Paty talked about the prophet in his class”, Branque said: “Make sure you get your facts right. He held a class on the freedom of expression using the Charlie Hebdo (satirical magazine) cartoons as an example.”
At the Battieres middle school in the southeastern city of Lyon one student, Corentin, said it was important for young people to talk freely without parental control.
“Some people can’t have this kind of debate at home, and so it’s not their opinion that counts, but that of their parents. It’s important to discuss so we can find out what we actually think,” he said.
Civics teacher, Clelia Mazzetti, asked the class for comments on her assertion “that you are allowed to criticise whatever you want”.
Elias, 14, replied that that question was “sensitive but important”, adding: “A year ago I was shocked that a teacher could be killed just for teaching. That’s a disgrace.”
His classmate Kylian said that, however, “you need to show a minimum of respect”, to which the teacher agreed: “You should not insult or slander anybody”.
It is “very difficult” to help children understand the events of October 16, 2020, Higher Education Minister Frederique Vidal told Franceinfo radio, “but it’s important to tell children the truth”.
– ‘Simple and contemplative’ –
Upcoming tributes to the murdered teacher include a memorial plaque placed at the entrance of the French interior ministry in Paris, to be inaugurated on Saturday by Prime Minister Jean Castex, other government ministers, Paty’s parents and members of his family.
The family will meet with President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace later in the day.
Also on Saturday, a square facing the Sorbonne University in the capital’s Latin Quarter will be named after Samuel Paty in a ceremony that the mayor’s office said would be “simple and contemplative”.
Schools in at least three towns have already been named after Paty, including in the multi-ethnic eastern Paris suburb of Valenton.
Coming in the wake of other attacks blamed on Islamist extremists, it also triggered a new wave of debate over integration and immigration in France’s officially secular society as the country heads to 2022 presidential polls.
22 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
They said the quiet part out loud again
1K notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Can I get a resounding hell yeah
890 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Time for people to call her a traitor because firsthand eyewittness accounts are bad if they make communism look bad.
1K notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 4 months ago
Text
As American educational institutions continue to be called into question, a North Korean defector fears the United States' future "is as bleak as North Korea" after she attended one of the country's most prestigious universities.
Yeonmi Park has experienced plenty of struggle and hardship, but she does not call herself a victim.
One of several hundred North Korean defectors settled in the United States, Park, 27, transferred to Columbia University from a South Korean university in 2016 and was deeply disturbed by what she found.
"I expected that I was paying this fortune, all this time and energy, to learn how to think. But they are forcing you to think the way they want you to think," Park said in an interview with Fox News. "I realized, wow, this is insane. I thought America was different but I saw so many similarities to what I saw in North Korea that I started worrying."
Those similarities include anti-Western sentiment, collective guilt and suffocating political correctness.
Yeonmi saw red flags immediately upon arriving at the school.
During orientation, she was scolded by a university staff member for admitting she enjoyed classic literature such as Jane Austen.
"I said ‘I love those books.’ I thought it was a good thing," recalled Park.
"Then she said, 'Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were racists and bigots and are subconsciously brainwashing you.’"
NEW YORK CITY'S MESSAGE TO KIM JONG UN HONORING OTTO WARMBIER
It only got worse from there as Yeonmi realized that every one of her classes at the Ivy League school was infected with what she saw as anti-American propaganda, reminiscent to the sort she had grown up with.
"’American Bastard' was one word for North Koreans" Park was taught growing up.
"The math problems would say 'there are four American bastards, you kill two of them, how many American bastards are left to kill?'"
She was also shocked and confused by issues surrounding gender and language, with every class asking students to announce their preferred pronouns.
"English is my third language. I learned it as an adult. I sometimes still say 'he' or 'she' by mistake and now they are going to ask me to call them 'they'? How the heck do I incorporate that into my sentences?"
"It was chaos," said Yeonmi. "It felt like the regression in civilization."
"Even North Korea is not this nuts," she admitted. "North Korea was pretty crazy, but not this crazy."
After getting into a number of arguments with professors and students, eventually Yeonmi "learned how to just shut up" in order to maintain a good GPA and graduate.
In North Korea, Yeonmi Park did not know of concepts like love or liberty.
"Because I have seen oppression, I know what it looks like," said Yeonmi, who by the age of 13 had witnessed people drop dead of starvation right before her eyes.
"These kids keep saying how they’re oppressed, how much injustice they've experienced. They don't know how hard it is to be free," she admonished.
"I literally crossed through the middle of the Gobi Desert to be free. But what I did was nothing, so many people fought harder than me and didn't make it."
Park and her mother first fled the oppressive North Korean regime in 2007, when Yeonmi was 13 years old.
After crossing into China over the frozen Yalu River, they fell into the hands of human traffickers who sold them into slavery: Yeonmi for less than $300 and her mother for roughly $100.
With the help of Christian missionaries, the pair managed to flee to Mongolia, walking across the Gobi Desert to eventually find refuge in South Korea.
In 2015 she published her memoir "In Order to Live," where she described what it took to survive in one of the world’s most brutal dictatorships and the harrowing journey to freedom.
"The people here are just dying to give their rights and power to the government. That is what scares me the most," the human right activist said.
She accused American higher education institutions of stripping people's ability to think critically.
"In North Korea I literally believed that my Dear Leader [Kim Jong-un] was starving," she recalled. "He's the fattest guy - how can anyone believe that? And then somebody showed me a photo and said 'Look at him, he's the fattest guy. Other people are all thin.' And I was like, 'Oh my God, why did I not notice that he was fat?' Because I never learned how to think critically."
"That is what is happening in America," she continued. "People see things but they've just completely lost the ability to think critically."
Witnessing the depth of American’s ignorance up close has made Yeonmi question everything about humanity.
"North Koreans, we don't have Internet, we don't have access to any of these great thinkers, we don't know anything. But here, while having everything, people choose to be brainwashed. And they deny it."
Having come to America with high hopes and expectations, Yeonmi expressed her disappointment.
"You guys have lost common sense to degree that I as a North Korean cannot even comprehend," she said.
"Where are we going from here?" she wondered. "There’s no rule of law, no morality, nothing is good or bad anymore, it's complete chaos."
"I guess that's what they want, to destroy every single thing and rebuild into a Communist paradise."
1K notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Gov. Kate Brown, the Oregon Democrat, signed a bill last month with little fanfare that drops the requirement that high school students prove proficiency in reading, writing or math, before graduation, a report said.
The Oregonian reported that the governor has seemed to avoid discussing Senate Bill 744. Her move to sign the bill was "not public until recently, because her office did not hold a signing ceremony or issue press release." The paper also pointed out that the bill was first signed on July 14 but not added into the state’s database until July 29 due to a glitch in the system.
Brown’s office did not immediately respond to an after-hours email from Fox News.
In June, state lawmakers voted to approve the bill that suspended the requirements for students for three years, KATU reported. Foundations for a Better Oregon said in a statement at the time that the bill is intended to "truly reflect what every student needs to thrive in the 21st century." Supporters of the bill insist that considering math and reading essential skills has been an unfair challenge for students who do not test well. The report said the requirement was first suspended at the start of the pandemic.
The KATU report pointed out that Republicans have come out against the bill and claim that it lowers "expectations for our kids." But there was some bipartisan support.
Charles Boyle, the deputy communications director from Brown’s office, told the paper in an email that staff from the governor’s office informed legislative staffers about the bill's signing on the day it was passed. He also said that the new standards for graduation will help benefit the state’s "Black, Latino, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Tribal, and students of color."
The paper reported that the bill could stay in effect for five years until new requirements.
The paper's editorial staff urged Brown to veto the bill back in June.
"Oregon schools were among the last in the country to reopen to in-person instruction during the pandemic," an editorial read. "Our legislators should be focused on how to help students regain the ground they’ve lost after a year and a half of distance learning and hybrid instruction – not on lowering our standards." _____________________________
Oregon governor thinks minority students can't hack it and lowers the standard
524 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 months ago
Text
For almost three decades, 81-year-old David Lidstone has lived in the woods of New Hampshire along the Merrimack River in a small cabin adorned with solar panels. He has grown his own food, cut his own firewood, and tended to his cat and chickens.
But his off-the-grid existence appears to be at risk.
"River Dave," as he's known by boaters and kayakers, is behind bars after being accused of squatting for 27 years on private property.
As the owner of the land seeks to tear down the cabin, Lidstone has been jailed since July 15 on a civil contempt sanction. He faces a hearing Wednesday.
"He's just a really, really, big caring guy, and just chooses to live off the grid,'' said Jodie Gedeon, an avid kayaker who befriended Lidstone about 20 years ago.
She and other supporters are trying to keep him in his cabin in Canterbury, including organizing a petition drive and working to collect money to cover property taxes.
"It really is about humanity, it really is about compassion, empathy ... he's not hurting anybody,'' she said.
Gedeon and other supporters came out to a town selectboard meeting on Monday. Board members said the town currently has no standing in the property dispute.
But even if there were a way to allow Lidstone to stay, it would be an uphill battle. His home is in violation of local and state zoning and environmental regulations, and there is no access to a road.
"You guys are in a quandary. So are we,'' selectman Robert Steenson said.
The woodlot Lidstone calls home is just a few miles away from Interstate 93. But it's hidden by the trees; it's on 73 acres that's been used for timber harvests. The property has been owned by the same family since 1963. There are no plans at this time to develop it.
Lidstone has claimed that years ago, the owner gave his word but nothing in writing allowing him to live there. But in the eyes of the current owner, he's a squatter and needs to go.
Property owner Leonard Giles, 86, of South Burlington, Vermont, didn't even know Lidstone was there until the town administrator found out in 2015 and told him, expressing concern "with regard to the solid and septic waste disposal and the potential zoning violations created by the structure,'' according to Giles' complaint in 2016.
Giles' lawyer, Lisa Snow Wade, said her client "hasn't needed the stress these last few years."
Lidstone, a bearded, small-framed, spritely man, has resisted efforts to leave since a judge issued an order for him to vacate in 2017. Following that, both sides had attempted to reach some sort of agreement for him, but were unsuccessful, according to court documents.
Currently, Lidstone can be released if one of three things happen: he agrees to leave, the cabin is demolished by Giles, or 30 days have passed since he was jailed.
"I will sit here until I rot, or I will go home,'' Lidstone, who doesn't have a lawyer, told the judge from jail on July 28 when asked if he'd agree to go back to the cabin to collect his things and depart for good.
He hasn't had any other contact with law enforcement, unlike the case of a man in Maine called the "North Pond Hermit," who also lived in the woods for nearly three decades and pleaded guilty in 2013 to multiple burglary and theft charges.
Over the years, Lidstone, a U.S. Air Force veteran and a father of four who has made money as a woodsman, has been known to invite kayakers and boaters into his home, sharing stories about his life in the wild.
The wooden, two-level A-frame cabin, was profiled by a local television show in 2018. There is a small, cluttered kitchen with pots hanging from the ceiling, some appliances, and curtains on the windows. His porch has a footstool with a base made of stacked beer cans. He converted a wood stove into a beehive. He's attached lights, a mirror and a pulley for a clothesline to logs supporting the cabin. There are piles of firewood.
Nearby is a gravel path leading to vegetable garden plots outlined by logs and some berry bushes. Lidstone gets his water from a stream.
Lidstone's decision to live in the woods is "exactly the lifestyle he wants," said his brother, Vincent Lidstone, 77, of Lafayette, Georgia.
"What they're doing to him isn't right for anybody, whether he's my brother or anybody's brother," he said. "He's 81 years old. Leave him alone."
Vincent Lidstone said he lost touch with his brother through the years, but described how the two of them and a cousin enjoyed spending time outdoors. They grew up in Wilton, Maine.
"We lived in the woods," he said. "We camped, fishing, hunting. The three of us did everything together for a lot of years."
It's unclear where Lidstone would go. Vincent Lidstone said he doesn't have the resources to help him. The Associated Press reached two of his three sons, who said they haven't been in touch with their father recently. His daughter didn't respond to a message seeking comment.
Gedeon said the matter hasn't been discussed by her group yet.
"We want to see him be able to live out his remaining years where he is," she said.
597 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
He's not advocating killing yourself, just your whiteness, whatever the fuck that is
At least that's what what I've seen is saying
268 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Losing count of how many times I've seen stories like this
233 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · a month ago
Text
The online ad bouncing around the Russian Internet earlier this month was for a sushi chain with growing popularity, opening dozens restaurants across Russia: four smiling young people wielding chopsticks as they dig into noodles and seaweed bowls and grab at a plate of gigantic sushi and maki rolls.
Three of the people were women, apparently Russian. One was a black man.
Conservative activists immediately unleashed a campaign of hateful, racist attacks on social media and elsewhere, accusing the owner of spreading the "propaganda of multiculturalism."
Now the owner of the chain, originally launched in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, is apologizing publicly -- and in doing so, has added new fuel to a social debate within Russia about progressive commercials in business marketing.
Tumblr media
The incident is the second in recent months involving a Russian business putting out a marketing campaign that ostensibly appears to embrace progressive values -- only to be savaged by conservative critics.
The Russian government advocates multiculturalism and President Vladimir Putin frequently cites the country's multiethnic makeup: though Slavic Russians are by far the largest single group, Tatars, Ukrainians, and more than 180 other recognized ethnic groups are part of the country's sprawling cultural makeup.
But the state has also balked at cracking down on some nationalist groups that peddle bigoted and often racist ideas.
In a column on the business site VC.ru, Konstantin Zimyen, the founder of the chain Yobidoyobi, said his staff had been barraged with hateful comments for the ad and another one, which featured the black man posing alone.
Users of the Russian social network VK, he said, ripped into him for supporting multiculturalism -- a political idea rejected by many nationalists as a threat to Russian national identity.
Zimyen said some posters threatening him with violence, and also published his personal phone number online.
He told Russian media that he had introduced new security measures at his Krasnoyarsk apartment, and plans to appeal to the police. The company's website, meanwhile, was subjected to hacking attacks, though Zimyen didn't make clear whether it was knocked offline.
The chain, which started in 2016 in Krasnoyarsk, a city located more than 1,700 kilometers from the nearest ocean, now has 57 locations across Russia and neighboring Kazakhstan --- one indication of how the Japanese cuisine has caught on with Russian palettes over the past two decades in a big way.
"Why, in Russia in 2021, a black person provoked the ire of some people is beyond me," he wrote.
243 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Twitter out here doin what twitter do
307 notes · View notes
nunyabizni · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Oh Chippy, this might finally be the end for you.
Then again a racist, gun grabbing, communist mouthpiece might be just what the DNC wants.
278 notes · View notes