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#paperbark

Another re-run, since there’re more of you watching now than before. Melaleuca aka paperback trees, north of Seattle. Most commonly found in Australia, but occasionally transplanted. This one got a Judge’s Choice Award in the Maryland State Fair a few years back. ( /extremely minor brag)

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China 2014. Beautiful peeling bark on what looks like a birch tree in the Jiuzhaigou national park. It almost seems to glow!

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With bonus mantid. 

A Honey-myrtle endemic to the south-west of Western Australia, variable in size and form from a densely branched, small shrub to a small tree. It grows in sandy and clayey soils near watercourses, winter-wet depressions, rocky coastal areas, and flats. This one was growing in a waterside park, a few centimeters above the waterline at Australind, south of Perth, so probably counts as all of the above.

It has become naturalised in parts of southern Victoria.

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Jack is four years old he is a happy boy but he is shy. His mom and day always say “Don’t be shy Jack” but he still refuses to talk when he meets someone new. Then one day Jack meets Sarah and her shaggy dog Chase. Jack is very curious about that shaggy dog. Find out what happens. Will Jack speak to Sarah?

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Interested in purchasing an autographed paperback copy of one of my books? Contact me to learn how. :)

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‪The beautiful Australian native, the Paperbark Tree (Melaleuca Quinquenervia)‬
‪Tallebudgerra, Gold Coast‬
‪photo©jadoretotravel‬

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So I entered the State Fair this year… and this photo won a Judge’s Choice Award!

This is a paperbark tree, named for the obvious reasons. I entered it because I liked the colours and the water in the background set them off well. The texture was also pretty fun!

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Paperbarks are a group of trees, many found in Australia, that basically look like this - bark that curls off in furls.  This one was about an hour north of Seattle. Incidentally, it’s also one I’m entering in the Plants section of the State Fair photo competition this year.

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