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#park hee soon
laroseme · a day ago
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jiwoo really had chemistry with everyone except pildo even the detective who wanted to punch her in the last episode in the hospital had more chemistry with her than this whimsly detective I'm sorry but that character was forceddd
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in-yeop · a month ago
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Park Hee Soon as Choi Moo Jin
MY NAME (Episode 1)
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therukurals · a month ago
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It’s been a while Gang-jae. I knew you’d come here.
[ID: 6 gifs of Choi Mu-jin in My Name. He is in a small restaurant after a fight. In the first three gifs he picks up a phone and answers it. He speaks to Gang-jae on the other line. The fourth gif switches the angle, from below. The fifth gif wide shot of Mu-jin in the restaurant. The last two gifs are a close up on him as he looks up from the image on his phone concerned. /END ID]
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eggsaladstain · a month ago
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my name (netflix, 2021) is a really great example of how the obvious answer/ending is not always a bad choice when everything else is done well, and this show is done well
spoilers under the cut
on paper, this story is nothing new:
hero suffers a family tragedy, vows revenge, and joins up with an older mentor who was a friend of the family in order to carry out that revenge. hero does terrible things and blurs the line between right and wrong in their quest for revenge, culminating in the reveal of the truth - the family tragedy was in fact caused by the trusted mentor. hero confronts and ultimately defeats their mentor, but it’s a pyrrhic victory and this long-awaited revenge goes down bitter.
i guessed right away that the person who killed yoon jiwoo’s father would be choi mujin because in most mediocre revenge stories, the real killer is the person closest to the hero, the one person they’ve allowed themselves to trust. but my name is anything but mediocre because it takes that conventional, obvious ending and crafts its story in such a tight, cohesive way that this conventional, obvious ending is also the ending that is the most emotionally impactful and devastating.
jiwoo’s final confrontation with mujin isn’t tense and dramatic just because he killed her father. it’s tense and dramatic because they each care for the other and because their relationship and the trust between them was genuine, which makes mujin’s manipulation and deceit all the more painful.
jiwoo and mujin’s relationship is, for me, the star of the show, by a wide margin. they are each fascinating characters on their own, with incredibly compelling performances by han so hee and park hee soon, not to mention a solid supporting cast topped off with frenetic, brutal fight scenes, but what makes this show so gripping is the relationship between these two unlikely partners turned enemies.
you have this woman who has been beaten down by the world, who has lost the only family she has left, who feels the guilt of inadvertently causing her father’s death, who believes she has hit rock bottom and thus decides to take matters into her own hands, making a deal with the devil, not yet realizing how much more she has to lose. and along the way, she forms this relationship with that devil - he’s not quite a friend, he’s not quite family, and he’s not exactly kind, but he’s there for her when no one else is and that’s something, that’s everything to her. and in time, she lets herself care for this devil and she puts herself at risk to protect him, because he gives her a path to revenge, because he made her stronger, because she trusts him, because he’s the only one who loved her father as much as she did, because he knows her name, her real name.
and then you have this man who was betrayed by his closest friend, who hates that man as much as he once loved him, who has that man’s blood on his hands, who meets that man’s beloved daughter, who looks into her cold, furious eyes and lies to her face, who sees in her the potential that he could wring out of her before discarding her, who intends to use her as a weapon against his own enemies, who makes a deal with this foolish young woman, not yet realizing the price he himself will eventually have to pay. and along the way, he forms a relationship with this woman - she’s more than just his dead friend’s daughter, she’s more than just his mole in the police department, she’s more than just her usefulness to him. and in time, he lets himself care for this woman in his own twisted way and he puts himself at risk to save her, because she’s one of the greatest weapons in his arsenal, because he made her who she is, because he trusts her, because she is the only living piece left of his dead friend, who was his brother before he was a traitor, because she is her father’s daughter after all.
and despite mujin being the one manipulating jiwoo, their relationship still feels authentic even in spite of his lies. the inherent power imbalance between a younger woman and an older, powerful man is mercifully absent here, and they each demonstrate time and time again how far they’re willing to go to protect the other. jiwoo, who barely takes care of herself on her best day, takes the time to make chamomile tea for mujin to help him sleep. jiwoo, who gave up her own name and takes on a new identity to get revenge on her father’s killer, risks that identity on multiple occasions so mujin can escape. mujin, who is smart and meticulous and careful, wrecks his car and risks being caught at a crime scene to save jiwoo from being crushed alive. mujin, who callously killed his best friend for being a traitor, creates an escape plan for jiwoo with a passport and ticket to the beachfront property she dreamed about living in with the father that he murdered.
you can’t tell me that mujin didn’t genuinely care for jiwoo, not when he trusted her over his second in command, not when he saved her life, not when he kept her father’s photo on his desk for years after his death. mujin is such a fascinating character because, while his relationship with jiwoo is mostly equal, and at times, even tipped in her favor as he relies on her for police intel to carry out his business without interference, he still has the ultimate advantage over her because he knows who killed her father. and yet, he also still has this weakness for his old friend, and by extension, for his daughter. mujin has love and hate for donghoon in equal measure and there’s a part of him that feels guilty for killing him, no matter how justified the action may have been by gang rules. because it was donghoon who mujin spent years building his empire with, it was donghoon who once saved his life, it was donghoon who he called brother, and that’s not something that can be erased, not even by donghoon’s betrayal, not even by donghoon’s death at his own hand.
so, yes, mujin being the one who killed jiwoo’s father was the obvious choice, but it was also the best choice that had the most emotional impact in this story, and the way the story plays out is no less gripping for having the obvious ending.
this show really has it all: a badass female lead, hot bad guys in suits, devastating emotional stakes, brutal fight scenes, a male character getting fridged for the sake of his girlfriend’s character development for once (RIP pildo), and a song i can’t get out of my head.
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dazzlingkai · 13 days ago
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“Both the police and you do nothing! I gave up my future and my name to catch my dad’s murderer. My life has no purpose if I can’t kill him. I’ll become a monster.”
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in-yeop · 3 days ago
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Park Hee Soon as Choi Moo Jin
MY NAME (Episode 3)
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therukurals · a month ago
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The temple.  Upper lip. Chin. Solar Plexus. Stab me.
[ID: 5 gifs from the drama My Name. the first gif is a close up of shot of Ji-woo reach to grab a photograph of Choi Mu-jin and her father smiling. There is text in a typewriter font over it that reads “Are you thinking of running away?” The second gif is of Jiwoo pointing her gun to the right and swaying. The text over it reads in italics “I’m thinking of winning.” The third gif is of Choi Mu-jin walking towards her. The text reads “That is why you can’t win.” The fourth gif is of Choi Mu-jin and Ji-woo fighting each other, two different scenes of them slashing a knife at each other. The text reads “It’s not about winning, but killing. Kill him.” The fifth gif is of Ji-woo as she grabs a gun off the table and turns to walk away. The text overlaid reads “That’s what you should think. /END ID]
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eggsaladstain · a month ago
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Jiwoo, should we build a house and live by the sea? Let’s move to Jeju. We can build a house on the beach, hang a hammock in the yard, and have a dog too.  ... My dad and I used to talk about building a beach house and living there. We’d hang out front and we’d fish and swim every day like people with nothing to do. Because he wanted to live like that. And I always wonder, if he were still alive now, would we be able to live like that? ... Beaches are nice. I like being there. ... Jiwoo. You have to be happy and live a good life even if I’m not around, okay?
MY NAME (Netflix, 2021)
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