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#portrait of a woman
riversname · a month ago
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Portrait of a lady in profile by Max Volkhart (1848-1924, German)
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artthatgivesmefeelings · 11 days ago
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Ágost Canzi (Hungarian, 1808-1866) Portrait of a Woman, 1845
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peaceinthestorm · 4 months ago
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George Frederic Watts (1817-1904, British) ~ Choosing (Ellen Terry), 1864
[Source: npg.org.uk]
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tendalee · 5 months ago
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rivesveronique · a year ago
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Frantisek Drtikol Harlequin. Silver print,1919
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joan-blackbird · 3 months ago
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virgosandart · 25 days ago
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Picasso ”Portrait of Olga”
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z0v · 3 months ago
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Nicolas de Largillière Portrait of a Woman (Detail) 1696
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charlesreeza · 2 months ago
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Marie-Antoinette with a Rose, 1783, by Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun
Petite Trianon, Versailles
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themacabrenbold · 7 months ago
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(Attributed to) Bruyn d. J., Bartholomäus
circa 1530 Cologne - between 1607 and 1610
Portrait of a Woman
Half figure standing at a table facing left. Holding a red carnation in the right hand. Verso a memento-mori illustration ("COGITA MORI").
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John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) "Lamia" Oil on canvas Pre-Raphaelite Located in the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland, New Zealand "Lamia" was inspired by John Keats’s 1820 poem of the same name. Set in the wild hills of ancient Greece during an "evening dim at moth time," the poem speaks of a young charioteer who hearing a soft voice calling – "a maid more beautiful than [any] ever with twisted braid" – falls madly in love with her. He is unaware that in reality she is a monstrous half-serpent, who transforms into a woman’s form to prey on young men. The only visual clue to her nature captured is the molted snake-skin draped about her.
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riversname · 3 months ago
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Thomas Cooper Gotch (1854-1931, English)
- A study of female figures, one holding a lily
- The Dawn of Womanhood (fragment)
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artthatgivesmefeelings · 11 days ago
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Nicolas de Largillière (French, 1656-1746) Portrait of a woman, 18th century - The painter Nicolas de Largilliere was the society painter of the eighteenth century. With his portraits he caught an image of the flourishing society under the reign of Louis XIV and XV. This picture is a typical example of a fashionable portrait of Larguilliere in the beginning of the early seventeen hundreds. We know from contracts that the price for a portrait like this, without depiction of the hands, the artist demanded 600 livres. It is quite difficult though, to identify the ladies he painted, because he reduced and embellished the faces of his clients to satisfy their vanity. This approach of portrayal was a common practice of the era. The famous art critic Roger de Piles ascertained in ‘Cour de Peinture par Principe’ that particularly women were less tolerant of realism when they were to be portrayed. (Cour de Peinture, 1706) This painting is a characteristic work of the master in a composition he repeatedly used during his career, with or without hands. It is even very well possible that the clothes worn on the painting were owned by the artist. They happen to appear on more than one occasion in the work of the artist, as can be seen on ladies portraits in the Rau collection, the Bayrische Gemäldesammlungen in Munich and in the Museum of Fine Arts in San Francisco in different arrangements. We also see similar tranquil backdrops here. Largilliere regularly painted several versions of a portrait, as is the case here. Next to this copy of the hand of the master, another copy of his hand is to be seen in the Musee Cognacq-Jay in Paris. A third version, from the atelier of Largilliere, can be seen in the Mayer van den Bergh Museum in Antwerp. The identity of the lady, Although the painting has the name of Jeanne de Robais written on the back in an elegant handwriting, it is not at all certain the portrait is hers. Repeated surveys to identify the elegant lady have failed to date. If she is Jeanne de Robais, she is the daughter of Isaac de Robais, a fabulously rich manufacturer from Abbeville. Isaac’s son Abraham was portrayed by Perroneau in 1767 in pastel. (portrait d’Abraham de Robais, 1767 Musee du Louvre R.F. 4146) The version in the Musée Cognacq-Jay in Paris traditionally is called portrait of Madame la Duchesse de Beaufort. She was of English nobility and portrayed during her stay in Paris. Little more of her is known. The atelier version of the painting in the Mayer van den Bergh Museum was obtained from the mayor of Oudenbosch, J.B. Klyn, in 1898. It is said that it concerns a ancestral portrait from a family of French nobility that fled France in 1795.
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peaceinthestorm · 29 days ago
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Anders Zorn (1860-1920, Swedish) ~ Lucy Turner Joy, 1897 
[Source: St.Louis Art Museum]
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tendalee · a month ago
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artschoolglasses · 2 months ago
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Portrait of a Woman, Etienne Charles Le Guay, 1800
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lavitaliz · 8 days ago
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LIZ AT 50
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fawnvelveteen · a year ago
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Pierre-Louis Pierson
Portrait of a Woman (Circle of Duc d'Aumale)
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charlesreeza · 6 months ago
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Madame de Loynes, 1862, by Amaury-Duval -  Musée d'Orsay
Marie-Anne Detourbay, aka Mademoiselle Jeanne de Tourbey, and by marriage the Countess of Loynes was a half-socialite who held an influential literary and political salon in Paris under the Second Empire and the Third Republic.  A half-socialite is a woman whose status oscillates between a courtesan and a mistress maintained by a wealthy man.  Though technically married to the Count de Loynes, they never had a genuine relationship as he was in America most of the time.  The countess later became the mistress of the French writer and drama critic Jules Lemaître, 15 years her junior.
Photos by Charles Reeza
I was mesmerized by this portrait as soon as I saw it.  
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pol-ski · 8 months ago
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Portrait of Jadwiga Gaszczyńska (c. 1907) by Konrad Krzyżanowski (Polish, 1872–1922) 
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