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#romantic period
themeadowinforks · a month ago
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oh to be a middle class lady in the 19th century who has nothing to do all day but have time to think about her romantic afflictions and her beloved
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thekaramazovsister · 20 days ago
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most composers naming sonata movements: allegro, adagio, menuetto, presto...
Liszt: ALLEGRO ENERGICO, CANTANDO ESPRESSIVO, STRETTA QUASI PRESTISSIMO, MARZIALE UN POCO MENO ALLEGRO
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senfonikankara · 3 months ago
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Fanny Mendelssohn | Notturno
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moonbirdy · a year ago
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starting a club for people whose identity is artistry but are only capable of creative thought between the hours of one and three am i’ll bring the coffee
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seaofwine · 2 months ago
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the medusa, 1816
I can’t stop thinking about this, so I’m about to make it your problem too. Let’s talk about shipwrecks. 
In the summer of 1816, the 40-gun ship called la Méduse set sail from the island of Madeira and was en route to Senegal. As the ship approached the coast of modern day Mauritania, it ran aground over a rocky coral reef, ripping the ship apart and sending the entirety of her passengers scrambling for whatever lifeboats could be secured. As is an unfortunate commonality among devastating wrecks, there were not enough for all 400+ people aboard. When all were filled, roughly 146 people remained without a vessel. Crew members and passengers alike worked together, tearing up planks and rods, using the clothes on their backs and discarded ropes to tie together a raft. It was just big enough for all of them to fit on it. 
Twelve days, this raft floated across the sea with no headway, hundreds of miles from home. Not one, but two mutinies broke out, dwindling their numbers as men killed each other in attempts to grab power. People resorted to cannibalism as the days dragged on, blistered by the hot sun and left delirious from starvation and dehydration. Their last day afloat, they were happened upon by the ship Argus. Fifteen people survived. 
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Theodore Gericault immersed himself in this tragedy to preserve the triumph of its survivors in paint. It took him years, and the strain of such a burden on his psyche ultimately led to his death at the age of 32.
History is one unbroken thread from the beginning of everything, passed through each set of hands to the next, preserving knowledge, stories, and the secrets of the past. Paintings, whether they appear in children’s handprints on the inside of caves, or massive, intricately detailed oils on canvas, is residue of our shared past. It is human existence, persevering, with its artist reaching out through time to show you, me, us, a single frame of humanity. We study it not because of any  social capital we can flaunt, but because it is important . It is important to see, to know, to appreciate the vastness of the life we all share. We are continuations of things that come before, and for a moment, whether looking into the eyes of a man who has just lost his son, or at the hand of the boy thrusting a flag of distress, we know.
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mellowchouchou · 4 days ago
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Brahms - 16 Waltz, Op. 39: Waltz No. 15 in A-flat major
performed by Balazs Szokolay
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byronicist · a month ago
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“Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, / To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, / Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, / Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, / And so live ever—or else swoon to death.”
John Keats, “Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art” (1838)
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gaysparklywizard · 12 months ago
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if tchaikovsky’s marche slave is meant to be a funeral march, why is it such a fucking bop?
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kxllakxm · 3 months ago
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Transcendentalist vs Gothic: the Romantic Period (2011)
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history-crushes · a year ago
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Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
German composer, pianist and conductor of the Romantic period.
Famous for his works such as his Symphony no. 1 or Hungarian Dances.
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gasparodasalo · a year ago
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Frédéric Chopin (1810-49) - Fantaisie-Impromptu in c-sharp minor, Op. 66. Performed by Luc Devos, Broadwood piano, ca. 1845.
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remuslupinsflannel · 3 months ago
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is Batman just....a brooding Byronic hero???
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la-nero-maestro · a year ago
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Symphony No.8 In E Flat: Pt.2 - Final Scene From Goethe's "Faust” (Poco Adagio)
By Composer Gustav Mahler
Performed By Conductor Pierre Boulez And The Staatskapelle Berlin
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senfonikankara · 23 days ago
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Rahmaninof | 3. Piyano Konçertosu, Intermezzo
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moonbirdy · a year ago
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the best revenge isn’t moving on and pretending not to care. if you really want to disconcert people, stick your fingernails in and bring out your insides. leave them there on the table. no one wants to see you cry. that’s why you should do it. 
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magnumx-opus · a year ago
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here’s Franz Liszt, joining the composer gang ✨ a friend told me to draw my interpretations of more historical figures so I think I will !!
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musicollage · 6 months ago
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Vladimir Horowitz – Horowitz At Home. Deutsche Grammophon : 1989.
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byronicist · a month ago
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“With spiders I had friendship made / And watch'd them in their sullen trade, / Had seen the mice by moonlight play, / And why should I feel less than they? / We were all inmates of one place”
George Gordon Byron, The Prisoner of Chillon (1816)
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lupusmaxima · 12 months ago
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i’m absolutely infatuated with the romantic period and there’s nothing you can do about it!
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mellowchouchou · 4 days ago
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Albéniz: España, Op. 165: Tango in D major
performed by Balazs Szokolay
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