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#scott washington

You know those “what should someone say in order to summon you?” meme? I think i finally found mine.

Someone *mentions Scott Washington’s death*

Me *kicks down a door* ok first of all thank you for remembering him, not even Marvel does that, secondly HIS DEATH WAS UNJUST AND UNFAIR AND I WILL NOW SHOUT ABOUT IT FOR 3 HOURS

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Scott Washington was actually a featured character even before he became the host to the Hybrid symbiotes! Appearing in New Warriors stories.

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He was Guardsman Number 6 of the vault and even their you can truly see the kindness that led to him allowing the tortured symbiotes to escape and them taking so very fondly to him:

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Because he knew what the law said was right wasn’t right here and he acted on that - despite knowing the consequences of doing so for himself.

And compassion was definitely a defining characteristic of Washington.

He treated the inmates he was guarding at the Vault well and even befriended one of them - Justice, who you see above.

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A friendship used to take a stand against dehumanisation/depersonalisation of prisoner and guard alike:

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I would definitely recommend checking out his prior appearances, to anyone at all interested in the character.

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I’m reading about the kids Venom was forced to give birth to and NOW I’M SAD THEY WERE SO SCARED

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THEY BONDED TO THE GUY WHO WAS KIND TO THEM, SCOTT WASHINGTON (they literally called him “the kind one”) BUT WHEN SCOTT GOT MAD AND TRIED TO KILL SOMEONE THEY DIDN’T WANT TO KILL???

AND EDDIE TRIED TO KILL THEM AT ONE POINT AFTER A PSYCHOTIC BREAK???

I’M SO SAD FOR VENOM’S KIDS I WANT TO HUG THEM :’( 

Even though they eventually got to bond with a doggie. 

Still sad tho

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@exhausted-drone said:

True it’d be good to have Scott in there, plus it makes it so all the symbiote merge into one character, and helps with the budget….but I’m a big Toxin fan too

How I said, I love Toxin and I remember being super excited to see very heroic symbiote character and Patrick’s take as a protective father to the symbiote was a interesting and fresh concept.

I mean, I want him and Scott being in the film series, honestly!

But I found weird Sony prefer to put Patrick first instead Scott.

I’m going to asume maybe this related to the “Silver and Black” film, about Black Cat and Silver Sable, and Sony is using that Toxin’s origin story in “Venom Vs. Carnage“ series, where Black Cat appears as a way to connect both films.

But again, how Sony said they wanted to use character rarely seen, it bothers me they aren’t showing interest in Scott.

Maybe because Scott’s story is kinda confusing, but they can use him anyway with a blank slate without worry about “autentic adaptation“ because there isn’t a lot of person who remembers him.

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I admit, I have read a lot about the news related to Venom film, but I found there is an actor as “Patrick Mulligan“, the human host to the Toxin symbiote.

While I’m excited, I still think this is erasure to Scott Washington aka Hybrid, especially because his story is related to the Life Foundantion.

If Sony is going to take the oscure character of the Marvel Comics, unless they take the one who great potential, especially with Scott being a disabled black character.

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“Come on, babe,” Scott coaxes. He places a trail of kisses along the back of Venom’s neck. “I’ll let you be little spoon,” he murmurs quietly into Venom’s ear. Venom seems to deliberate this for a moment, a very long and exaggerated moment. Eventually, he concedes, tugging Hybrid down along with him. Venom scoots back as close as he can, practically fusing their bodies together. Scott does his best to restrain a laugh, throwing an arm over Venom’s black frame. Venom grabs his hand, holding onto it with fixed determination. If not for his super strength, Scott would have definitely lost circulation in his hand. It’s not as awkward as it seems, being the bigger spoon to a larger body. Especially not when Venom practically purrs from the soft kisses Scott leaves along his neck and shoulders every now and again. Otherwise, Venom’s completely unresponsive. He may be sulking, but Scott’s not going to ruin Venom’s eager anticipation for a day of intimate romance. He was planning on giving Venom a day off to remember.

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Among the 5 forms that Hybrid comes in, this one here is potentially dangerous on Bleed-oriented team. Hybrid’s Riot Form gives him the “Out for Blood” passive which makes his attacks give out 3 stacks of Bleeding right off the bat!

Classes: Bruiser (This is an alt, since Hybrid’s base class is a Blaster)

Suggested E-ISO:Close E-ISO should suffice on Bruiser Hybrid. If not, you can use Genetic Memory E-ISO if you run him with other Symbiote characters.

ISO-8 Builds: 

Hybrid’s Riot Form; despite of being a Bruiser is often treated as an attacker. You can go for a versatile build or an offensive-oriented Hybrid.

Offensive Riot Hybrid: 8x Steady (Purple; +HP, +ATK, +ACC)

Versatile Hybrid: 3x Stalwart (Prismatic; +HP, +ATK, +DEF), 2x Steady (Purple; +HP, +ATK, +ACC), 3x Forceful (Orange; +ATK, +ACC, +DEF)

Attempt to One-Shot Hybrid: 8x Violent (Red; +HP, +ATK, +ACC)

You can either go for three ways in using Riot Hybrid. You can go for an Offensive build that focuses on HP bulk and Offensive stats or if you want a little bit of versatility where he can take punishment, my personal Versatile build which applies to all Hybrids, actually or if you’re a risk-taker, then go for a complete Violent ISO-8 build which could possibly one-shot someone if given the chance. Bring a protector if you’re going for the Violent ISO-8 build.

Suggested A-ISO’s:

LV1 (Riot): If you’re running Riot a.k.a Bruiser Hybrid. I strongly suggest that you socket a Rioting A-ISO which will grant this attack Exploit Bleeds. This actually makes this variant scary. Don’t have gold? Then boost its attack (if using Close E-ISO) or critical power.

LV2 (Agony): This move can go in three ways if you’re gonna use his personal A-ISO’s; if you’re follow-up savvy for attacks then Pinned Down A-ISO will do fine. Do you like to trigger bleeds? Then consider using the Quilled A-ISO. Agonizing A-ISO is also okay if you want to dish some extra damage later on. If not willing to get those then just boost attack (if using Close E-ISO) or critical power.

LV6 (Phage): I recommend giving Hybrid the Debilitating A-ISO for this move especially if you want to shut down debuffers such as the likes of Peast since it grants Depower. If not then, boost attack (if using Close E-ISO) or critical power.

LV9 (Lasher): Shifting A-ISO sounds nice especially if you want follow-up attacks later on. If not then just boost the attack rating (if using Close E-ISO) or increase critical chance.

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By: A. Scott Washington, J.D.

By now we all know the facts of the Casey Anthony case. Caylee goes missing. Casey fails to report Caylee missing, lies to her family about the child’s whereabouts, and behaves deviously throughout the police investigation and public campaign to find Caylee. We’ve seen photographs of the young single mother partying hard while her toddler daughter is missing. She is photographed during the duration of little Caylee’s disappearance drinking, partying and committing petty crimes. Caylee’s remains are found months later dumped just blocks from the Anthony home.

Guilty of first degree capital murder? According to the Prosecution … but no one else.

An Orange County Florida jury acquitted Casey Anthony of the capital murder of her three-year- old daughter Caylee. Prosecutors alleged that Anthony deliberately, and with premeditation ended the life of Caylee. In a capital murder case, the prosecutor must establish every element of murder plus properly weigh the aggravating factors present in the case.

Prosecutors in jurisdictions across the country routinely overcharge criminal suspects in their zeal for the almighty “W.” Casey Anthony charged with first degree capital murder is a prime example of these practices. It has been three years since charges were filed against Anthony. I have watched and listened to the pundits; closely monitored the trial; debated the issues with college students; and replayed the facts as they have been presented dozens of times. I have yet to hear or see any evidence that would remotely suggest that Anthony specifically intended, with premeditation, to end the life of little Caylee.

Florida defines murder as the unlawful killing of a human being “when perpetrated from a premeditated design.” When a prosecutor makes the charge that one is responsible for the death of another, the discussion turns to the level of the criminal intent (or culpability) of the accused. A murder charge, as opposed to some lesser homicide offense (which should have been more vigorously argued here) requires the presence of a premeditated design. In other words, the accused must have the specific intent to kill. Where specific intent to kill is not present, second degree murder or manslaughter is usually charged.

The win at all cost approach in this case led to a disregard for the facts of the case (i.e., the totality of the circumstances specific to this particular case), and ultimately the pursuit for truth and justice. The case of Florida vs. Casey Anthony is not and has never been a death penalty case. Was this a case of child neglect or abuse? Maybe. Was it negligent or reckless homicide? Probably. It is clear to me that the States Attorney’s office was seeking more than truth and justice when filing its case against Anthony. It was seeking the “W” at the highest level possible; a death sentence.In this case, the prosecutors approached twelve reasonable jurors with an unreasonable request; send an attractive white female to death row to await lethal injection on the basis of an ill- conceived theory of the case, shoddy circumstantial evidence, and junk science.

The State’s Attorney here simply overcharged Anthony and offended the jury. Once offended, the jury rejected any

theory of the case the prosecutor put forward. Thus, it disregarded the evidence and science that would have supported a lower level homicide conviction.

Juries typically do not want to send a person to their death. By focusing so much on the “W” at the highest level, and failing to present the strongest possible case for a lower level homicide conviction, the prosecution in this case failed.

The laws that Anthony potentially violated in this case in terms of the death of Caylee are:

Florida Murder Statute 782.04(2), which states:

The unlawful killing of a human being, when perpetrated by any act imminently dangerous to another and evincing a depraved mind regardless of human life, although WITHOUT any premeditated design to effect the death of any particular individual, is murder in the second degree and constitutes a felony … emphasis added

or

Florida Murder Statute 782.07(3), which states:

A person who causes the death of any person under the age of 18 by culpable negligence under the Florida child abuse statute commits aggravated manslaughter of a child, a felony…

According to the Florida Department of Corrections’ website, the average sentence for a conviction of one of the aforementioned Florida statutes (non-capital murder statutes) is nineteen years. We now await the sentencing and release of Casey Anthony. It is likely that she will be credited with time served for the misdemeanor conviction for lying to law enforcement and released.

The prosecution in this case had several options in terms of charging Anthony. By overcharging Anthony and overzealously pursuing a specific intent premeditated capital murder case (the elements of which could not be established), the prosecution not only abused its discretion, but offended the jury; thus, breaching its duty to the criminal justice system, the people of Florida, and most importantly, little Caylee Anthony.

A. Scott Washington, J.D. is an Assistant Professor of Criminal and Social Justice at the University of St. Francis in Joliet, Illinois

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