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lionfloss · 18 hours ago
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Korea by Teresa Freitas
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uroko · 3 months ago
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Rainy evening, 여의동. (source)
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one-time-i-dreamt · 9 days ago
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A man went viral in Seoul, South Korea yesterday for this very photo. Pictured here is a man in a suit on his phone, sitting on a car in an extreme flood and heavy rain.
Seoul was hit with the biggest amount of torrential rain in over 80 years. There has been flooding, landslide, building collapses, power outtakes, and unfortunately, at least seven confirmed human casualties (and 6 people unaccounted for), among them a 13 year old girl. May they rest in peace.
The man in the photo was later revealed to have been a reporter reporting live from the scene on his phone.
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This is how it all looked from his point of view.
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The reporter's name is Park Sang-ryul (박상률) and he works for Yonhap News TV (연합뉴스TV).
I can't for certainty say where the original photo of him comes from, because it was reuploaded a million times already so if you find credit please do tell me, but I believe this was the first tweet to feature it: link to tweet.
The reason I chose this photo is because it shows well just how apocalyptic things are right now. I have friends in South Korea who are scared out of their minds due to the situation, and my thoughts and prayers are with everyone affected. I hope all of you are safe.
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happyheidi · 4 months ago
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~ hi_dongwon on ig
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m-interior-m · 11 months ago
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Source
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4rba · a year ago
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bookmania · 7 months ago
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Starfield Library, Seoul, South Korea 
ig//lea.vienn
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solomonsgarden · a year ago
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Street art in Seoul, South Korea
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ddaengju · 4 months ago
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iseoulu
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lolaveda · 10 months ago
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ILL-STUDIO, 2010 - 2020 Files, Kukje Gallery, Seoul
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books · 3 months ago
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Writer Spotlight: Claire Ahn
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Claire Ahn grew up in Seoul, Korea, which she still considers home. She moved to New York to attend university and now lives in Long Island City with her husband, newborn daughter, and their dog, Dante. Claire writes about transcultural experiences and the traditions, values, and legacies that shape who we are. I GUESS I LIVE HERE NOW is her debut novel. Click through to read about mouth-watering food and homesickness remedies, and for some really good writing advice.
Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to write I GUESS I LIVE HERE NOW?
I think most debut authors would probably divulge this, but the first novel is always a bit of a circuitous path. You can never really pinpoint the beginning of the first because it’s just this blurry idea you had years ago that somehow—through repetitive classes and workshopping and rejections—becomes a novel. I suppose this idea was conceived back in 2016, but it’s gone through many transitions, from a children’s book to a middle-grade book, then a young adult novel, and within it, about four to five full revisions. 
I started writing to release stress from a grueling job in public relations, where writing felt so formulaic and not at all creative. I’ve always loved storytelling, and was told PR is the world of storytelling as a profession, but it wasn’t enough to fill the creative well in me. So I took up course writing at Gotham Writers Workshop, which is how this all began for me. Plus, I got free wine every week. How could I have stopped attending? 
You’ve written your own experience in reverse, going from New York to Seoul, and made it YA. What were some challenges you faced in doing so? 
From a craft perspective, it was hard to write Seoul as if it was the first time. Everything there feels second nature to me, from the street foods to the lavish grocery stores and intensely beautiful cafe culture. It’s never a shock when I go back home, so having to write it fresh was hard. Hopefully, I somewhat successfully captured the newness of it from Melody’s eyes. From a personal experience perspective, my constant fear is that someone in my life will be convinced a flawed character was inspired by them! Woof. If you’re reading this, close friend or family member, this is not the case! 
Melody and her friends are all navigating parental expectations while trying to make their way in the world. What do you hope readers take away from seeing these character dynamics represented?
 Am I the only one feeling like I sometimes live my life intensely trying to please my parents? Oh God, I hope not. I hope readers feel seen and less alone in having dreams that may defy the wishes of parents or guardians or even of peers and the capitalistic society in which we live. I hope readers feel reminded that they can simply be. They can have lofty dreams like Melody, or they can want to dream of being comfortable and accepted in their skin, like Kimbeom, or they can just want to live in their present, and that is all okay and good. Let’s change the narrative of having to stamp influential footprints in this world. 
Seoul is your home, but you live in Long Island City. How do you approach writing about being in between two cultures, and what’s your favored remedy for homesickness?
I think I operate on a default state of longing and clinging. I’m always longing to visit Seoul any chance I get, and I live in a state of clinging onto my culture tighter than my high school banquet dress. I release myself from those states of being by writing stories where I get to pretend like I’m in Seoul again or where I imagine my life as a teen in New York, fresh from Korea. My favored remedy for homesickness is buying a plane ticket to Seoul and immediately texting my friends back home that I’ll be there soon. Then, every day until I’m on that plane, I dream of being surrounded by faces like mine, speaking in my native tongue, and stuffing my face with high-quality rice cakes (dduk). Does that sound sad? I swear I love my life in New York, too. 
The descriptions of food in IGILHN are incredible. What’s your favorite Korean dish, and can you make our mouths water describing it?
Thank you! You know, I didn’t know food was a theme in the book until people pointed it out. Food is such a deeply ingrained part of Korean culture that it wasn’t an intentional ploy, but as it turns out, it is impossible to write a book set in Seoul without a proper description of the bounty of food on offer. My favorite dish has got to be my mom’s homemade galbi jjim, braised short ribs. I can’t even eat ones from a restaurant because it tastes horrible compared to her concoction. It’s a common holiday dish for New Year’s or Chuseok, but for me, it was the dish my mom made every time I landed in Seoul from New York. An expression of love poured into a dish that takes hours to make. I always imagined her making it in the kitchen the night before I arrived, eagerly waiting for her younger daughter to come back home. It’s a thoughtful dish because it’s not something you can whip up at a moment’s notice, and if you try to, you will never mimic a galbi jjim that has been simmering for hours. It’s both a deliciously sweet and intensely aromatic and savory dish. When done right, the meat falls off the bones at the softest pull with chopsticks, and it’s generously coated with a sauce made from Korean radishes, jujubes, pears, chestnuts, and garlic. As my husband says, it’s a ‘flavor explosion.’ 
What made you want to be a writer? What advice can you give to budding writers working on transcultural narratives?
I’ve always wanted to be a writer, but growing up in an Asian household, I wasn’t made aware that writing was a chosen profession. I was sort of led to believe it was something you did on the side of your ‘real’ job, which just meant making a stable income with the goal of homeownership. As a daughter of immigrants, stability was highly valued in our household, so writing wasn’t really a ‘serious’ option. But I wrote my first play when I was in the second grade, a whopping eleven pages of some friends living on Mars, spying on Earth people.
My advice would be to find a writing community and celebrate small milestones. I couldn’t have gotten here without my group of writers that I met through Gotham Writers; equally, I might have given up if I wasn’t so damn good at celebrating even the stupidest things: Submitted a manuscript? Buy myself a typewriter! Read a book during a desolate book lull? Eat my favorite ice cream! The journey to finding an agent, revising, then selling your book, then revising again (and again and again and again), then finally seeing it hit shelves (which I haven’t yet) is LONG! So, unless you’re a total Grinch and happy to be one, celebrate; because you can’t go years without that celebratory joy to keep you motivated. 
What does Melody’s Tumblr look like? Obviously, she’s got some interior design in there, but what else does she post? What’s the vibe like?
The vibe is definitely a modern cafe look with a splash of pop, which is also her fashion style. Isn’t our Tumblr vibe just a digital reflection of our fashion? Mine definitely was. Mel’s Tumblr is probably like Comme des Garcons meets Alexander Wang. 
IGILHN is your debut novel—what’s next for you?
I’m working on my second book now, and it’s not set in Seoul! It’s set right here, in my second favorite city, New York. Everyone says book two is the worst. Surprisingly, I don’t want to rip my eyes out, and I’m thoroughly enjoying exploring my new fictional friends and their immigrant families and New York’s Asian food culture. Soup dumplings have already made their way into my pages multiple times. I can’t share too much yet, but I hope it stays as fun as it’s been so far and that it finds its people. 
Thanks so much for answering our questions, Claire! I GUESS I LIVE HERE NOW will be hitting shelves on May 24. That’s today in a week! 
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dark-rob · 13 days ago
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stukko · 10 days ago
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happyheidi · 3 months ago
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obsessed with the korean pastel kitchen aesthetic. x
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wedarkacademia · 3 days ago
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fuckyeahmarxismleninism · 7 months ago
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There's virtually no coverage in English of the mass workers' protests in South Korea yesterday organized by the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU). 
Fortunately the comrades from Nodutdol for Korean Community Development are posting updates on Twitter. Keep in mind that these actions were held in defiance of a total government ban on labor rallies:
"Reports are still trickling in, but the Jan 15 All-People’s Mobilization seems to have been a success. Here are photos from the 15,000-person rally held in the Yeouido area of Seoul.
"The All-People’s Mobilization also featured demands for a peace treaty to end the Korean War, permanent suspension of US military exercises in Korea, and more. Workers are not only fighting to improve their conditions but also for peace and reunification. "
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fulminatoin · 4 months ago
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