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wastelesscrafts · a day ago
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Bias tape 101
Bias tape is a very useful tool when sewing, but leaves a lot of people confused. What's the difference between bias tape and a simple strip of fabric? What can you use it for? Can you make it yourself?
Let's take a look.
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(Image source) [ID: three spools of bias tape wound around a piece of white cardboard. The three tapes are made out of a white fabric with orange, blue, and green flowers, a pink fabric with blue and red flowers, and a white fabric with red diagonal stripes.]
What is bias tape:
Bias tape is a strip of fabric that's been cut on the bias of the fabric, then folded so it's easy to work with. You can both buy commercial bias tape or make it yourself.
Bias tape has many uses, including binding necklines and armholes, making drawstrings and straps, used as trims, casings, hemming, binding edges, finishing seams, appliqué,...
What makes bias tape different from just plain old strips of fabric?
There are two types of fabrics, generally speaking: woven and knit. Woven fabrics consist of threads that criss-cross each other, while knit fabrics have threads that loop into each other. Knit fabrics are stretchy, but woven fabrics aren't.
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(Image source) [ID: woven versus knit: threads that criss-cross each other versus threads that loop into each other.]
There's one way to get a little stretch into projects using woven fabric: cutting your pattern pieces on the bias of your fabric. This means aligning your pieces in such a way that they follow the diagonal direction of your fabric (a 45° angle), rather than the straight grain.
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(Image source) [ID: a diagram with a blue square representing a piece of woven fabric. A diagonal line shows the bias grain. The sides of the square show the width/weft thread, the selvedge edge, and the length/warp thread of the fabric. Text: "sewguide.com".]
Fabric cut on the bias will stretch more than fabric cut on the straight grain. It will also drape better and be less prone to fraying. The downside is you'll need a lot more fabric to make a bias-cut garment than a straight-cut garment.
Bias tape will have all of these advantages over strips of fabric that have been cut on the straight grain of the fabric.
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(Image source) [ID: a diagram of a blue rectangle representing a piece of fabric, with its selvage edges and width denoted on the sides. A bodice pattern is laid out three times on the fabric: once on the straight grain, once on the diagonal/bias grain, and once on the crosswise/off grain. Text: "sewguide.com".]
How to make bias tape:
As I've mentioned, you can buy commercial bias tape in most craft stores. These are great if you need quick access to tape, or if you're daunted by the prospect of making it yourself.
Making your own bias tape is useful if you want your tape to match the fabric you're working with, an advantage you'll never have with store-bought bias tape. Bias tape is also a good stash buster: the climate impact of bias tape you've made from leftover fabric scraps is lower than bias tape that was commercially made and shipped to a store, as you're reusing pre-existing material rather than buying something new.
If you only need a little bias tape, the easiest way to make it is to start by drawing a line at a 45° angle on your fabric. Mark adjacent lines running parallel to your original line on your fabric for the width of tape you need.
Cut your fabric on your marked lines, then join the ends together to create longe strips. Don't just sew them together in a straight line, as this will take away some of the bias stretch. Place one end of a strip on top of another at a 90° angle, right sides together. Draw a line between the two points where the strips cross, then sew along that line with a backstitch. Iron your seam, and cut away the excess fabric.
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(Image source) [ID: six photo's showing how to make bias tape by cutting diagonal lines out of fabric, then sewing the resulting separate strips together at a 45° angle.]
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(Image source) [ID: close-up of a diagonal seam where two strips of bias tape have been joined. The seam has been pressed open and the excess fabric cut away. Text: "Press open seam. www.treasurie.com."]
If you need a lot of bias tape, joining all of your separate pieces is a lot of work. An easier method to accomplish this is the continuous bias tape method. This method is a little too complex for me be able to explain it properly, but both Sew Guide and Treasurie have good tutorials on how to do it.
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(Image source) [ID: a photo of a continuous strip of bias tape made from blue fabric with white polkadots, followed by text ("Continous bias tape. www.treasurie.com.", following by an 8 picture diagram showing how to make continuous bias tape by creating a fabric tube and cutting it into strips.]
How to fold bias tape:
You now have a length of bias tape, but how do you use it? Isn't it supposed to be folded?
While there are different techniques to start sewing with the bias tape you've created, you'll have an easier time using it once you've folded it. Three common methods to fold your bias tape are the single bias tape, the single fold bias tape, and the double fold bias tape.
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(Image source) [ID: three close-up's on a piece of green bias tape folded in different ways: a double fold bias tape (edges folded inwards, then folded in half), a single fold bias tape (edges folded inwards), and a single bias tape (tape folded in half).]
The easiest way to fold your bias tape is to use a bias tape maker. These little gadgets will fold your tape for you.
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(Image source) [ID: a strip of green fabric is pulled through a metal bias tape maker. The unfolded end is fed into one end and comes out with its edges folded inwards at the other end, where it's ironed in place with an iron. Text: "Pull and press. www.treasurie.com."]
If you don't have a bias tape maker, you'll have to fold and iron your tape yourself.
Single bias tape: fold your tape at the centre with its wrong sides facing each other, then iron it. You're done.
Single fold bias tape: fold your tape at the centre with its wrong sides facing each other, then iron it. Open up your tape again, then fold the edges towards the centre crease you've just created, and iron them. You're done.
Double fold bias tape: fold your tape at the centre with its wrong sides facing each other, then iron it. Open up your tape again, then fold the edges towards the centre crease you've just created, and iron them. Now re-fold your tape at the centre and iron it again. You're done.
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(Image source) [ID: two pictures of a strip of blue fabric with white polkadots being ironed into bias tape. The first picture shows how the strip is folded in half and pressed. The second picture shows how the ironed strip is opened up again and the edges pressed towards the centre crease of the strip, meeting at the centre.]
Conclusion:
You now know what bias tape is and how to make it yourself! Once you've gone through all of the steps above, you'll have a length of tape that's ready to use however you want.
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cyberglittter · 4 months ago
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designs by disco lemonade
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hexandbalances · 2 months ago
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"Constanze" Austrian dirndl in Tyrol green, "Hannah" black cotton blouse, and  "Vineta" linen skirt in black from Voriagh.
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goingtiny · 6 months ago
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Having really enjoyed mending some pairs of jeans repeatedly over the last two years after reading up on sashiko, I decided to try another clothing repair book from the library, and quite frankly, if you are a sweater-lover/wearer, this is THE mending book you need.
Seriously, I've known how to mend knits for decades, but not as beautifully as Noriko Misumi does it. She uses lots of different techniques to approach both repair and design, and it's really dawning on me just how many things I have which are going to get fixed so much more aesthetically now. All those little holes I tend to ignore are about to get fun and funky.
Hands-down, she's got the best photo layout of how to darn socks I've ever encountered (and I studied costuming in college), and as a hardcore pedestrian, it's time I learned to repair those colorful and expensive wool socks I put so much effort into obtaining.
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gatheringmoss · 9 months ago
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i love making my own clothes 💕🌸handmade sweater and beret 🍄🌿
beret for sale in my shop
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unfauxgiven · 2 months ago
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woke up thinking about "i'd make my own clothes but it's so expensive". the amount of times i've heard this without the person saying it putting 2 & 2 together is wild. so you know the cost of making a garment, how do you think fast fashion companies are selling them for so cheap? that's right, they don't pay their workers fairly. even the best company discounts on fabric & other supplies can't bring the cost of a garment down that astronomically if they're paying their workers a living wage. let's also not forget the low quality, unsustainable materials they're most likely using to reduce cost further to lure in consumers. fast fashion is cruel & a scam and i'm so tired of it.
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lovely-low-waster · 4 months ago
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Lists like these I find are great if you have a way to filter microplastics out of your laundry with something like  guppy bag. I also use it when I’m looking for a new clothing item. Being able to pick natural fibers over synthetics is preferable when there's the option. Even when clothes aren’t in the wash they release micro plastics as you wear them. When looking for new items I try to look for  more natural fibers. This also holds over for other items where textiles are part of their construction. If you aren’t overly familiar with different types of fabrics hopefully this will be useful in making decisions on how to be more responsible for your textile waste!
photo credit to reducewastenow on instagram
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in-herbones · a year ago
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Little grief cape No.2 one of a kind and handmade with boiled wool, luxe black silk taffeta backed velvet, eyelash lace and cotton silk pleats. The little crying faces I sculpted a casted to act as the center front closure. This might just be my most favorite thing I’ve made and it’s now available 🖤🥀
Inherbones.bigcartel.com
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klwknn · 3 months ago
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I think I'm using this as dp for the rest of the year
okay ba yung saket bewang pose ko dito?
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gatheringmoss · 3 months ago
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everything in my Etsy shop is 10% off until tomorrow 🪴🌻🌸💞🌳
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unfauxgiven · 3 months ago
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guys i was doom scrolling on Instagram and came across a post about shein and the comments were mostly "so what if they use child labor? all companies do that" and it's like... no... they don't. people were recommending more expensive fast fashion (think urban outfitters and H&M), and so many of them were greenwashed by the recyclable packaging that the unsustainable clothes come in.
this is why we NEED to keep spreading awareness.
a lot people genuinely think that sustainable clothing/fashion is unattainable. we all know that the answer is to consume less (no you don't need $200 worth of $5/piece clothes from shein, if that's the shopping habit you're used to i'm not surprised that you think sustainable fashion is only for the rich), but until we can change this mass over-consumption, "need to be new" mentality, things will stay the same.
we need to make it easier for people to find the sustainable brands, because a lot of people won't take the time to search "sustainable clothing brands" and read through an article. we need them to not see a $40 shirt and immediately close the page, wondering why it's so expensive. instead they should wonder why fast fashion is so cheap. we need to inform people of greenwashing, and that a company with recyclable packaging doesn't necessarily always have eco friendly products or use anything close to ethical practices. that more expensive doesn't always equal better practices or quality.
we need to keep fighting for our future, guys. there are still so many people who don't even know what they don't know - please keep raising awareness.
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claudiaclockwurst · 5 days ago
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Ooo who is she?? Roman rib socks, toe up with a fleegle heel and rolled cuff.
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pennybunlolita · 3 months ago
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Made a faux collar based off of a Black Peace Now pattern from the first issue of the GLB.
Doodle with a messed up hand.
Torchon ground bobbin lace bookmark I made last week.
Torchon ground with a footside and fan for practice, on a roller pillow I made with paper towels and felt 🙃
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wastelesscrafts · 2 days ago
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Hi i was wondering if ypu had any advice for widening an armhole on a nightgown? I have a goregous linen nightgown with lace that fits be perfectly everywhere but the armholes. Basically unless i have perfect posture it begins to dig into un underside of my arm and tightens across my back
I desperately want to use it more but i toss and turn as i sleep and am worried ill ruin it
A linen nightgown sounds really nice, especially for summer. However, a nightgown that's uncomfortable to sleep in kind of defeats its own purpose.
Upsizing armpits
I have a few posts on altering arm holes and sleeves that might be of interest to you:
How to upsize clothes
Replacing sleeves
Upsizing arm holes
Armpit alterations
If you don't need a lot of extra space, check how much seam allowance your gown has. Letting out the seams might be sufficient. Check out my post on letting out pants to see how it's done. It's a different garment, but the technique's the same.
You could also try using insertion lace. This might look odd at the bottom of your armpit, but could make for a cute detail at the top of your shoulder.
If you end up having to add in extra fabric, try looking for a scrap of fabric that's made of linen, too. Linen is very breathable, and inserting something like e.g. polyester in the armpit region would render it less effective in that regard.
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lovely-low-waster · 3 months ago
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Decoding labels is difficult with so many buzzwords and false labels as eco friendly practices become more popular. Many companies slap fake labels onto products. This chart will let you understand some of the labels. If you can recognize these symbols you’ll be able to know if these brands have more legitimacy. Third party certifications do better at holding companies accountable as someone else is actually verifying the standards of practice. 
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