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#social distance
ucsdhealthsciences · 8 months ago
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Vaccines for COVID-19 are being administered to thousands in the U.S. daily but cases are still spiking across the country and our health care workers are feeling the impact. Although we’re starting to see light at the end of this prolonged-pandemic tunnel, it is far from over. But there’s still a lot that we can do individually to keep ourselves and our health care workers safe: stay home as much as possible, wear a mask, practice social distancing and wash your hands.
Remember, we are all in this together.
Illustration courtesy of @docscribbles, a.k.a. Cathy Cichon, MD, MPH
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nxxstybrat · a month ago
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Just because you’re vaccinated doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get tested regularly. Especially if your job requires you to be around a lot of people . Especially if you’re planning on traveling. ESPECIALLY if you’ve been working, traveling AND live in a high risk household. Those two shots don’t mean shit. Be responsible and continue getting tested. And please continue being safe.
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mednerds · 10 months ago
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3-D Simulation Showing Why Social Distancing Is So Important
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Public health experts and elected officials have emphasized again and again that social distancing and wearing a mask are the best tools we have to slow the coronavirus outbreak.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages people to stay home. If you must venture out, you should stay at least six feet away from others and wear a mask. 
Scientists are learning about the novel coronavirus in real time, and those who study similar respiratory illnesses say that until it is better understood, no guideline is likely to offer perfect safety. Instead, understanding the possible transmission routes for the virus can help us see why keeping our distance is so important.
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By Yuliya Parshina-Kottas, Bedel Saget, Karthik Patanjali, Or Fleisher and Gabriel Gianordoli (The New York Times).
Note: This visualization is based on a scientific simulation that has not yet been peer reviewed.
Sources: Masashi Yamakawa, Kyoto Institute of Technology; Donald K. Milton, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health; Pratim Biswas, Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory at Washington University in St. Louis; Barry Scharfman, Head of Data Science at PA Aerospace & Defense.
Makiko Inoue contributed reporting from Tokyo. Additional work by Jon Huang and Mark McKeague.
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cannibalgh0st · 2 months ago
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▪︎Please wear your face masks
▪︎Social distance
▪︎Wash your hands
▪︎clean your living space
▪︎Practice proper hygiene
▪︎Get vaccinated
▪︎Respect others during this time
▪︎Be safe
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ucsdhealthsciences · 9 months ago
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"There is a lot of emotion right now - tears of joy and happiness. It's been a long year, and in the emergency room, we see so many people who are sick. This vaccination makes me feel a lot of relief." Brianna Salas, nurse in the Emergency Department at UC San Diego Health, was the first team member to receive the COVID-19 vaccine — at 8:38 a.m. on Wednesday, December 16, 2020
Ending the Pandemic Begins Now A Statement by Patty Maysent, CEO, UC San Diego Health
December 17, 2020  — These are momentous days, though too often darkened by rising rates of COVID-19 transmission, reports of overstressed hospitals, increasing sickness and mortality. But now, we are in a moment, one infused with hope. We are turning a corner: the beginning of the end of the pandemic.
This week, the first allocation of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine arrived at UC San Diego Health, just as similar shipments are appearing across the country. The first inoculations at UC San Diego Health are slated to begin this week as well.
Per guidance for the Centers for Disease Control, Food and Drug Administration and public health experts, these first doses will go to health care workers at UC San Diego Health who are deemed at greatest risk of exposure to COVID-19, such as emergency department staff, critical care staff, trauma staff, respiratory therapists and personnel with face-to-face patient care in urgent care clinics.
Our goal is to vaccinate as many employees as quickly as possible, depending upon supplies and evolving circumstances. With subsequent vaccine shipments from Pfizer and as other vaccines, such as Moderna, come online, we will expand the opportunity to vaccinate to all health system employees, our patients and communities beyond. We are determined to do this as safely and effectively, as rapidly and methodically, as we can.
But even with actual vaccinations starting, we must continue to follow all current measures designed to slow viral spread and infection, from masking and distancing to hand washing and signing up for CA NOTIFY.
Some may ask why rush to vaccinate if these other measures are working. The simple answer is that they are only partial measures; the only way to completely end this pandemic is to widely distribute safe, effective vaccines, minimizing the costs to society, already so dear.
To that end, we have begun.
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starrynight0612 · 6 months ago
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Sending positive vibes to the people in Texas and Mississippi who are wise enough to not listen to their governor's and continue to wear masks and social distance. You are strong.
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5 tips for surviving quarantine with abusive family!
1) Get out of the house when possible, even if it's just small breaks to the back yard. Just a change of scenery and some fresh air can do wonders.
2) Learn the GRAY ROCK METHOD. It can be a life saver. It takes practice so be patient with yourself.
3) If you're not under shelter in place, get out for a walk or bike ride. Exercise is incredibly helpful for staying emotionally stable. Try to stick the pavement as the risk for Lyme disease is at its highest at the beginning of spring. If you do want to go into nature, make sure you understand tick safety first.
4) VENT. Venting is important. Do it any way that's safe for you. Journaling, texting with friends, discord, email. Whatever way you can find to release the tension.
5) Stay connected to friends as much as possible. Any influence you have outside of the toxic dynamic of your family can help keep things in perspective.
Do you have any tips to add? Feel free to reblog with add-ons!
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