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by jessica_c_rhodes on Flickr.Adare Manor is a 19th century manor house located on the banks of the River Maigue in the village of Adare, County Limerick, Ireland.

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Add Art in Unexpected Places! Visit my shop at www.SerraCraft.com > for just $49.00
Mountain Lake Wall Plate - Hidden Landscapes Light Switch Plate Series ABOUT THE IMAGE: The image is of a piece of Jasper stone, sliced and polished to reveal the inner landscape hidden in the stone. I love the surprise images that can be found in this beautiful earthy semi-precious stone. This one reveals a mountain lake, with a mountain in the distance. Colors range from browns to blues to golds ABOUT THE PLATE: ~ The image is mounted on a heavy, high quality cast metal plate base. The plate base is a heavy cast metal finished in a antique brass tones. Once mounted the plate is sealed in poured resin. ~ The switch plate can be cleaned with a damp microfiber cloth. ~ All switchplates come gift boxed as shown in the last photo, above. AFTER YOU PLACE YOUR ORDER: ~ Your switchplate will ship out 1 - 3 business days after you place your order. ~ All switchplates are shipped by Priority Mail expedited delivery service. EXPECT DELIVERY DELIVERY IN 1 - 3 BUSINESS DAYS FROM ship date.

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two views of FOUR REDS UNDER (the provisional working title)

Work-In-Progress: FOUR REDS UNDER - before attachment of the clear glass

Irish Connemara slate, slumped clear glass, frit-cast glass, dichroic glass, glazed stoneware, brass pins, brass tubing, lacquer - 14"x 12"x  2½"

Like the last few pieces posted this piece began when another sculptor and I traded boxes of component ‘elements’ with each other. Lisa — the other sculptor —  works in glass and sometimes ceramic. She gave me a box filled with ‘test’ pieces of manipulated hot glass — slumped, fused, cast, kiln-carved, laminated, flash-frozen, etc. along with some glass rods used for lampworking.

This more-or-less rectangular kiln-carved or slumped piece of clear float glass she had given me was problematic. Because it was clear I knew I had to use it in some manner so something could be seen under it, though I knew the irregular bumps and textures from the slump would distort the and make whatever was under it almost unreadable or hard to decipher. After trying quite a number of my own found-object component elements I finally decided on these four — all of which had some red color in their make-up. 

The topmost element was a cut portion of a red and black frit-cast glass piece I had done 29 years ago. The guy whose glass kiln I was using back then had suggested ‘heatpolishing’ the finished casting by laying it on the kiln shelf and bringing the kiln temperature up just high enough so the surface of the glass would start to glaze-over and polish-out the matte finish left from the casting. Unfortunately he misprogrammed the time or temperature setting on the kiln-controller, and the casting melted into a 3/8th-inch thick puddle and even started to drip-off the edge of the kiln shelf. I kept the odd-shaped puddle for years before I used a diamond wet-saw and cut it up into smaller segments which I could use for ‘elements’ in mixed-media pieces. This was the drip over the edge of the kiln shelf, so it fitted nicely over the top edge of the piece of slate. The next element down is a cast red bronze spill coated in a light rub of transparent red lacquer. The third element down is a segment of the sculpted rim of a glazed stoneware punchbowl that had gotten broken. The fourth element is a rectangle of dichroic glass with an iridescent gold/red pattern.

After fitting the row of four component elements I fitted the clear kiln-carved/slumped glass form, raising it about ½-inch off the surface of the slate using 5 brass pins and five corresponding pieces of brass tubing. 

Before I epoxied the brass pins and the glass in place I took the glass and using the right and left edges respectively as guides I scribed the ten echoing lines — 5 on either side — on the slate.

I finished the piece a little bit over a week ago and have not yet come-up with a title any better than my working title.  Suggestions welcome.  It will have a title before it is entered into an exhibit … (rueful grin)

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