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#study tips
overdueassignments · 2 days ago
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23 sept ‘21
mildliners have been my loyal companion for the past three years, no clue as to how they haven’t run out of ink yet. i’ve been a bit tired and i really miss my irls, so it’s hard to find motivation to carry through with studying but the “discipline, not motivation” mindset helps. even though studying should involve passion and interest, for now i just want to quickly get through the exams.
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pen-pen-studyng · 12 hours ago
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nice weather to study in a cozy cafe with my friend, i hired a japanese tutor last week, and i am going to have Japanese conversation classes every Monday.🤎☕🥞
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selfhelpforstudents · 2 days ago
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I got a scholarship!! <3
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Good morning, everyone. How are you?
I'm currently studying. And I am so happy to announce that I received a very good scholarship. I am beyond excited about that and I am so grateful!!! In my application, I listed this blog and my Discord server and they must have liked it. Wow. That is just so cool.
Thank you to everyone who supports this blog. I AM SO GRATEFUL.
Love, Sophia <3
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notesbyquinn · a day ago
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Work Smart, Not Hard: a few practical study tips and tricks that have worked for me
(Note: These tips are not geared for students who are already doing well and would like to excel in their classes. These are for students who are trying to pass and find themselves overwhelmed and strugging to keep up. I have never been the former student, but I have certainly been the latter. "Work smart, not hard" is a mentality of pragmatism, not perfectionism, and the following tips are geared towards that.)
Ask your instructor what they want you to learn in the course (and what they're going to put on the final)
This tactic is especially helpful for big-picture people. Having a bird's eye view of the class as a whole can help you avoid getting overwhelmed with details. Though the "learn everything you can!" mindset is beautifully romantic and often espoused by professors, most of the time it is not practical. Within your class not all information is going to be equally important. Some sections are probably going to be more crucial to the course than others so instead of dividing your energy evenly across everything taught, focus in on studying and understanding that material. In courses that build upon previous information, this would mean focusing on the foundational topics
Secondarily, do not be ashamed of directly asking what is on the exam. Some instructors might take offense to that but you can always dress it up in alternative language to sugarcoat it. Suggestions of how to ask include "What are the key takeaways for this course?" and "What should we come of this course knowing?" or my favorite, "I want to really understand the material. What should I focus most of my studying on first?"
Don't set up study plans before a course begins (and/or don't force yourself to stick to them)
This is an optional and potentially controversial tip but I have a reason for claiming this. Too many times, I've gotten halfway through a semester only to realise that the study plans or summary reading sheets that I created at the start of the term have been untouched. Or worse, I've been using them and completely ignoring more efficient way to study. Classes, especially STEM classes, can really vary in how they are taught and what you are expected to learn/do within them. Some courses rely heavily on a textbook and structured reading notes help with that. Some courses list a textbook but barely use it, in which case stuctured reading notes aren't going to be particularly efficient. Sure, it would be nice to read the suggested text and put together a document of notes, but if reading the textbook isn't necessary to learn the material (which, in some courses, it honestly really isn't) then you are under no obligation to do so.
However, if you know what your course is going to be like and know that you work best with a study plan set out before the course begins, then use a study plan! You know how you study best (more on that later)
Set achievable goals (or break down your goals into smaller more achievable steps)
It's great to push yourself and to want to do the best you can do and set these lofty ideals (I'm looking at freshman first semester me right now) but that's also a really great recipe for burnout and a plummet in self-confidence. If you're an average studyblr tag following student, I'm sure there's been times where you've not managed to check off everything on your to-do list and felt a sense of guilt for not doing so. You shouldn't feel guilty, but I also do that on a daily basis and know that me just saying "don't feel guilty <3" isn't particularly useful.
So instead, break down your lofty goals into smaller steps. It would be great if I could read three chapters today but based on past experience I've only been able to do one or two a day, so I'll just change my goal to one for today and balance out the rest of my week's tasks so I can still complete all of my reading. Alternatively, put the bar to reach in a different place. Maybe I do need to read all three chapters today but instead of reading them as academic sources and taking notes, I'll instead set a goal of reading through all the words like a storybook. It might not be as ideal or perfect, but I'm still going to get a subset of the necessary information that way and it's something I know I can achieve.
Shameless point grabbing is your friend (and partial credit is better than no credit)
This one is pretty self explanatory; point grabbing is a blessing, particularly on non-multiple choice exams. Circling back to the "ask your professor what they're putting on the exam" point above, sometimes if you simply demonstrate that you understand (or are trying your best to understand) what they want you to learn, they may be more lenient in their grading. There have been many times where I've gotten stuck on an exam question with limited time left on the clock, and quite literally written out in words my thought process and what steps I was trying to do. I have written the names of concepts on my exams. I have written notes about how my numbers feel off and should be in this other numerical range instead. And sometimes, I have gotten credit and points back for doing so.
Good instructors want you to learn and understand that uni is difficult, so if you can show them that you are learning in some capacity they may let things slide a bit. It's the academic equivalent of looking an approaching driver in the eye while crossing the road; most of the time people's conscious kicks in and they avoid totaling you or your grades.
And most importantly: Learn how you learn (and don't always listen to advice on the internet)
I wasted the most study time trying to apply tips given to me by other people that were counterintuitive to how I actually process information. Thanks to a lot of self-reflection, I've discovered that I learn best when I am working alone to understand the information, asking my instructor or peers specific questions to patch in where I feel inadequate, and then going to review sessions to gauge where I am in relation to the class at large. Therefore, no matter how hard I tried, constantly working with other people in study groups was never going to be an efficient use of my time.
Figure out how you process and catagorise information in your own mind. Figure out if you need others to bounce ideas off to, or if you need the silence of an empty room. Figure out if you need wide open spaces to physically lay out your notes or if you need a small tidy desk with only a few things on it. Figure out if you need handwritten notes that force you to slow down and summarize instead of copying slides, or if you need digital notes full of thorough information that you can quickly rearrange. Figure out what you don't need. Figure out if you need a combination of everything depending on the material that day, or if you need one method that's tried and true.
Learn how you learn, so that you can work more quickly, more efficiently, and more intuitively.
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lovelybluepanda · a day ago
how do i stay motivated in college?
i’m 5 weeks behind in one of my classes and get so overwhelmed so anxious i get practically paralyzed
(also i have bad adhd if that helps/ some tips that work of ur average joe might not work w me)
My answers are not based on the fact if you have a mental illness or not. I just throw tips and you choose what you like because unless i research something specifically, i don't remember for which category of people they are for.
However, thanks to you I took out some of my time recently to research new focus methods for people with ADHD especially and i found something that could work on my anxiety so thank you!
First of all, you need to make a plan to see what you got visually. It will calm you down.
Secondly, realize that you don't have those classes daily so if you focus daily or at least every 2 days on the classes, you can catch up so don't worry.
You have enough time.
Next, (this is the part i researched) your ADHD can paralyze you and not work if you're not interested or you're anxious. While i was reading some articles, yesterday i found something that could work for most people.
Set an alarm for 15 min.
I'm not talking about pomodoro which is a study session and break system. I'm talking about making an alarm for 15 minutes and in those 15 minutes, you work only on that task.
You can increase the time if you think you need to but 15 min is not too much, not too little and the purpose is to put you into the right study mode enough to continue on your own. You can use pomodoro after this.
Since you probably distract yourself on a phone or laptop, you can access the alarm option from there. This means you don't have to move to set this "trigger".
Another method is to do something intermediate so you get moving.
Have you noticed how once you move you have motivation for anything? Get up, grab a snack and then go at your desk to study instead of lying in bed.
Unfortunately, i can't give you tips on how you can be motivated constantly because some symptoms of ADHD (like management if emotions and interest/urgency priority) prevent things.
However, how about you make a challenge out of your studies (can i finish 3 classes worth of material in 3 hours? Can I explain the material from this class only on 1 piece of paper)? Or try to find some goal to motivate you short term and then switch the goal to something else so you have new motivation for a couple of days?
Hope this helps~
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cptsdstudyblr · 8 months ago
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Chrome extensions I actually use as a mentally ill university student
Making websites easier to digest:
Dark Reader - Changes any webpage to dark mode.
Mercury Reader - Simplifies the layout of any webpage to eliminate distractions and irritating formatting.
Podcastle AI - Turns any article into a podcast. This is a lifesaver for being able to process what I’m reading, to be honest.
Spelling/grammar:
LanguageTool - Spelling and grammar check for those of us who regularly type in more than one language.
Grammarly - Spelling and grammar check for those of us who only type in English. Can be used with LanguageTool installed, which is what I do.
Google Dictionary - Define any word on the webpage with a double-click.
Google Translate - Translate an entire webpage or even just a short segment.
Misc:
AdGuard Adblocker - After trying quite a few adblocker options, this is the one I find the best.
The Great Suspender - Automatically suspend inactive tabs to help with performance. <- as an edit, I don’t believe this is available anymore
Honey - Try coupon codes automatically to save money on online purchases.
Built-in Chrome tab grouping - Group your tabs to keep organized and minimize distracting clutter.
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fexusliyo · 2 months ago
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random sites that are extremely helpful
animation screencaps
body visualizer
create infographics
desktop goose
help with writers block
boil the frog
professions based on your personality
best dictionary ever
fighters block
writing tool
slides go
slides carnival
online library
free movies and tv shows
free movies and tv shows #2
worldbuilding website
make music online
human pose reference
email signature
cool design templates
animation tool
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academiix · 3 months ago
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How I got a 4.0 first year in college | academiix
Watch the video version on Youtube. 
View my other tips and masterposts.
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blueplaidstudies · 3 months ago
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How to form habits that last
Click for better quality and zoom in.
Greetings! 💚 Here’s a little something I’ve been working on, which I hope you’ll find useful. :)
All text and graphics are created by me, Sal @blueplaidstudies.
☞ studygram
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academicsoftie · a year ago
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"One of the most prevalent obstacles in our ability to heal and self-actualise is when our productivity is tied to our worthiness."
I think the studyblr community especially needs to hear this. You don't have to be productive all the time, you need rest. Recovering from internalised capitalism means unpicking all the messages from family, friends, school and workplace that have reinforced the idea that you are a commodity, and that your worth is based on what you do. Your worth is inherent.
Source: therapywithlee
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ancientoptimism · 10 months ago
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You need motivation to study? Let me introduce you to spiteful studying. When you study a subject to prove someone wrong. When you spend hours writing up notes so that you can get that grade and smile smugly at the teacher who predicted you a lower grade. Find someone to prove wrong, it can be a teacher, a parent, friend or just to prove society that you’re so much more capable then they say you are!
Trust me, it works.
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suhyla · 5 months ago
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Super helpful Ramadan guide for any students out there by @sahraisha on Instagram!
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deadinside-intj · 21 days ago
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here are some techniques that i use to make my study hours better:
First, learn a general concept, second, learn a few facts and details, and third, identify a few examples.
Don’t sit for hours. Walk around and say the information aloud. Use a white board or flip chart to write and test your memory.
Use humor and association to help focus on and remember meaningless lists of facts.
Associate new with previously learned information. This enhances your ability to learn, integrate and retain it.
Take a timed, practice test in a room similar to the one in which you will be tested.
Take a few minutes after you read a selection to write a brief summary and then add two facts and examples.
Learn the elements of a diagram and then recreate it from memory on a blank page. Check accuracy and edit, if necessary.
Define a purpose for reading and then select a strategy for that purpose. Ask, “Should I survey, skim, or read closely?”
Study with the sound of your own voice. If you’re going to class (and you should be), you might as well make the time you spend taking notes count. When you get the due date for a test, record yourself reading your notes that you took in class, and be sure to include any of your own personal commentary to better understand the material. This takes very little time (depending on how fast/slow you read your notes), and then later when you’re walking to and from class, you can pop your earbuds in and listen to the sweet sounds of portable studying. Now any time you are just going about basic, mundane activities – showering, doing laundry, cleaning – can also be spent studying. Multitasking at its finest.
Put your phone to work. You reach for your phone at least a million times a day (that’s a made-up, but potentially realistic statistic), so why not let it help you do some studying? Make your phone background or lock screen into a study guide. Put formulas, keywords, or class material that you need to know front and center. Every time you go to pick up your phone, you’ll be confronted with the study material, and have a very mini-study session available to you in your pocket at all times.
Leave yourself love study notes. The whole point of this one is to get the material in front of your eyes as much as possible. Whether it’s posting some flashcards by your mirror, or keeping some reading material by the toilet (hey, that’s a bit of free time), putting your study material in the places you frequent the most makes you more likely to be reminded of the things you need to know. Not only will this jog your memory, but it will also make the class material front and center, reminding you to be thinking about it and perhaps even nestling itself in your brain for later recall.
also don't forget the pomodoro technique, it's really effective and it really boosted up the duration of my study hours. hope we both get good grades :) please keep in mind that these may work out for some and not for others. it helped me and i hope it does to you as well.
there's nothing wrong in seeking help when you need it. you got this champ!
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adhdbri · 5 months ago
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I get asked for tips for studying a lot, so I figure I’d share a brief overview of what helped get me through school and 7 years of university. :)
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04.07.21// today's the day friends. My last full day of editing my thesis before sending it off to my supervisor tomorrow for first edits (from him). I'll be in this chair for the foreseeable future, wish me luck! ✨📝 IG: flatneedledistillery
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