Tumgir
#tubers
yugirimistwalker · a year ago
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ɪᴛ ʟᴏᴏᴋꜱ ꜰᴜɴɴʏ, ʀɪɢʜᴛ?
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guugorou · 4 months ago
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ケミカル芋 - chemical tubers
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breezv · 2 months ago
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time traveling a lot means you miss out on some modern trends…
me and my friend’s oc’s!
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notwiselybuttoowell · a month ago
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Known as “the tuber man of Kerala”, Shaji NM has travelled throughout India over the past two decades, sometimes inspecting bushes in tribal villages, at other times studying the ground of forests closer to home among the green hills of Wayanad in Kerala. His one purpose, and what earned him his title, is to collect rare indigenous varieties of tuber crops.
Today, Shaji’s prized collection consists of more than 200 varieties of wild and indigenous tuber crops. The day we spoke, he had just finished giving a tour of his farm to 50 students from Bengaluru. To him, knowledge should be easily accessible. “I grow these crops on my land and then give the seeds to farmers and to anyone who wants them. In return, I encourage them to multiply the crops and to include them in their diet,” says Shaji, who calls himself a “cultivator” rather than a farmer.
But conserving some of the rarer tubers is not so easy as the climate heats up. Kerala is losing biodiversity as incessant and unseasonal rains wash away fertile fields. When, in 2018, Kerala received one of the heaviest recorded rainfalls in its history, Shaji’s farm was under water for 15 days.
“The scientists told me that everything would be rotten, and I believed them. I thought it’s OK to lose everything and start from the beginning as I did once,” he says.
But to his – and the village’s – surprise, “everything started to sprout back after a month or so,” says Shaji. “I have never used any chemical on my soil, ever. Maybe it’s because my soil is so good that nature does not devastate my farm.”
Researchers noted in a paper in 2018 that tuber crops “are resilient to climate change due to their capacity to surge over the adverse conditions by becoming dormant and resuming tuber growth during favourable conditions, thereby bringing down the chances of crop failures”.
This ability to tolerate changing climate conditions, say the researchers, makes the tuber “very important for the food security and income of people in this region as well as in many parts of the country”.
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nemfrog · a year ago
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“Let us glance for a moment at the economy or mode of life of the Potato-plant.” Gray's lessons in botany and vegetable physiology. 1873.
Internet Archive
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domenicosestito · a year ago
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spring time… in my kitchen (the forgotten potato is not sad, it makes flowers)
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apeironfarm · a year ago
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Camassia quamash also known as Small Camas, is a native to western America flowering bulb in the same family as agave, asparagus, hosta and yucca and has edible tubers. For over a hundred years the trend has been to buy exotic plants for your yard because they're more beautiful or interesting. So untrue! Look at this thing! Its amazing.
The native Americans propagated these as an important food source and it has special value to native pollinators. It naturalizes just like muscari, which shares the same plant family.
The tubers are said to be similar to sweet potato but sweeter. You can roast them for eating, boil them to make a syrup or grind them to make flour that can be used for baking or as a thickener.
We wont be able to eat any for a few years while they're getting established and then I'm so excited to try a native tuber of this land!
#camassia #camas #quamash #tubers #potatoes #sweetpotato #nativeplants #natives #nativeamerican #indigenous #indigenousfood #food #pollinators #healthy #healthfood #growing #growyourown #garden #gardening #nativegarden
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mothraeve · 10 months ago
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2 pretty Dahlias (by: Garden of Eve)
It’s really great to see these flowers after planting the tubers so long ago. They bloom late summer when other flowers are dying away.
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nncastle · a year ago
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My dahlia and annual Salvia tubers kept fantastically well over the winter. I used leaf mold, leaves, and a bit of soil mixed in with mulch and placed them in a cool, dark corner. As you can see, they look like fresh potatoes which is what you want. I’m now soaking them so I can plant them.
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herebedragons-digital · 3 months ago
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Full Moon
Waning into the Spring Equinox over the weekend.
Ideal time for getting root crops, tubers and corms off to a good start
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thepipsqueakery · a year ago
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Delilah enjoys laying on warm things, and rabbits enjoy being laid upon. Kismet. 💋 The radishes came from the garden growing in Pipsqueakery Brand Humus and Manure. It's delicious! To plants! 🪴Buut they might be turnips. I don't know. I didn't plant them. The baby buns from yesterday are doing well. And mom bun has decided she can nurse them even with a big healing c-section incision right between her mammaries. 💪 #bunny #rabbit #groundhog #woodchuck #yardbear #tubers #emoji https://www.instagram.com/p/CPyyCbJDU85/?utm_medium=tumblr
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ballsdotcom · 7 months ago
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breezv · 2 months ago
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life is better when you make oc’s together with friends (twt)
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blobfishious · 11 months ago
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whenever I see worms in stardew valley I’m digging for tubers
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zwischenstadt · a year ago
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Corn
If there was a good history book (and there probably is) on the cultural politics of different grains I would absolutely eat it up.  
- There’s an argument in economic development studies that rice-growing as a core economic activity causes higher rates of women’s workforce participation, which then leads to more personal independence for women in many areas of life.  The argument (well described in this blog post) is that rice-growing demands direct manual labor from the entire household, including wives and daughters. This in turn makes it more likely for people to accept seeing women performing paid work in daily life, and also more likely for women to hold onto their own personal reserves of money.  Today, there’s a huge gender divide in work/personal independence across India (between the North and South which respectively correlate with wheat and rice, in terms of their core grains) that actually applies across religious and class lines.
- There’s a weird history of anti-corn stigma in Europe and the U.S.  Northerners often mocked Black people and Southerners for eating grits (e.g. ”cornfed” as slang for poor and ignorant). 
- I remember a passage in Eduardo Galeano’s Century of the Wind talking about how rich Mexican creoles used to avoid eating corn tortillas, or would only eat them in secret 
- NW Spain is one of the big corn growing regions in Europe (according to people I talked to when I was there), used mainly for animal feed. I talked to one historical geographer there about agriculture in the region, and I asked him about stuff they did with corn in the cuisine, since I didn’t see it used in dishes in restaurant menus.  Apparently there is a cornbread recipe that exists in the culture, but it’s heavily stigmatized as poverty food, and you’d never see it in a restaurant. From the way he described it, it sounded like it would almost be insulting to insinuate that someone eats it.
- From just googling stuff, it seems like there was a similar deal with corn in France. NW France actually grows a lot of corn, but again, it’s almost entirely used for animal feed, and the traditional dishes seem to be viewed as poverty food.
- There are big regional divides in Italy regarding corn consumption.  In the far north of Italy (by the Alpines), they eat polenta as their main grain, almost never pasta. Not crazy in itself but I’d wager there’s some weird cultural history there. (Italians may have been more keen on grounded corn because it resembled the way they traditionally ground up & cooked faro, going all the way back to the Roman times.  That’s pure off-the-hip speculation on my part though.)
- There’s an ongoing debate in Anthropology & Archeology about the political implications of different regions of the world adopting different grains.  James C. Scott has argued that tuber-based diets slow/inhibit the formation of large states. Tubers (potatoes & co.) are difficult for a potential state to systematically identify or destroy, while wheat-type diets lended themselves to violent control by an authority. I know that at least some people in these fields reject this argument, but it’s interesting to think about.
- Look at this thing about corn
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crudlynaturephotos · a year ago
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vigouroso · a year ago
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youtube
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jillraggett · 2 years ago
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Plant of the Day
Tuesday 17 March 2020
In the walled garden of Wimpole Hall, Cambridge, Solanum tuberosum 'Swift' (potato) were being planted on a sunny spring day. This cultivar is one of the fastest maturing of the first early varieties producing crops of round, smooth, white-fleshed new potatoes. The seed potatoes being planted had been ‘chitted’ (encouraged to sprout) having been placed in a light, frost-free place. The potatoes will be earthed-up by drawing soil around the stems to form a ridge. This process will exclude light from tubers preventing them from going green.
Jill Raggett
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but-it-burned-in-one · a year ago
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My dad just referred to Youtubers as “tubers” and on god I thought this man was talkin bout some potatoes
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breebird33 · 2 years ago
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Tubors 👑🥔✨
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