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urbanrelicsphotography · 2 hours ago
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CONTROLE FERROVIAIRE
I visited several of these abandoned signal boxes of the Belgian railways in the past year, but this example, located at an important railway junction, was surely the most beautiful and impressive. Still relatively untouched by vandalism, except for a few smashed windows. The signal box became redundant when the control of train traffic was centralized. The construction of the new complex, which will serve as a control center for train traffic and as a training center, started in 2011. It was put into use in 2016, after which this signal box became vacant. 
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ORIENT EXPRESS
A first class compartment of a train, a dining car and a goods carriage have been rusting away for years. Particularly the first class compartment, with its velvet upholstery and wooden veneer, is reminiscent of a time when travel by rail was considered a luxury. Unfortunately I could not retrieve any information as to why the carriages were abandoned. 
Edit: obviously this is not the real Orient Express! In order to best protect abandoned places from looters, vandals and pyromaniacs, these places are given a pseudonym by urban explorers. 
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urbanrelicsphotography · 3 years ago
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RETURN OF THE KING
This chateau was once the property of a noble family. Many of these families fell into poverty and the chateau was sold to a wealthy business man. At the beginning of the 1990′s there was an inferno that reduced the once splendid castle into the ruins that is left today. Nothing remains but the empty carcass of the chateau. But what a carcass it is! Nature has slowly but surely taken back what was once hers, which gives the place an extraordinary look and feel.
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theabandonedsouth · 3 years ago
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Horace Burgess’s Treehouse of The Minister’s Treehouse (Crossville, Tennessee)
ADDRESS: 364 Beehive Lane, Crossville, TN 38571 
COORDINATES: 35.985300, -84.994433
Horace Burgess, one of Crossville’s local ministers, alleges that he was praying in the year 1993, and during that prayer, he was told by God, "If you build a tree house, I'll see that you never run out of material."
After receiving that message, Burgess began building a treehouse to serve as a church where he could deliver the Lord’s message. The treehouse ended up as a 97-foot-tall treehouse supported by a live 80-foot-tall white oak tree with a 12-foot diameter trunk. The treehouse also relies on six other oak trees for support. Although there is no Guinness World Records category for the largest treehouse, it is often referred to unofficially as the world's largest. The treehouse served as a church, and when not in service a basketball court. (See basketball hoop towards the back in the last photo.) 
In 2004, fire marshalls shut down public access to the structure as it did not comply with fire safety codes. Horace said "I built it for God, and God watches over it. He's protected everyone for all these years” in response to the shutting down of the church. Since Horace stopped construction in 2005, the structure has been immensely vandalized with graffiti. (Some of it praising God, to which Horace responded, “I don't know how to take that.) "I have to remind myself that it is a tree house," said Horace, who feels that it somehow causes people to act like children. "That's why I've never prosecuted anyone for bustin' the stuff up."
There have been no deaths reported at the treehouse, nor any near it. Despite this, many feel extremely uneasy upon exploring the treehouse; almost as if they are being watched. Horace himself called the church a “haunted house” that is “possessed by the Holy Ghost.” 
*I took these with my new camera, hope you all enjoy! I do believe that I’ve made a post about this treehouse before if so enjoy it again! Happy exploring.
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urbanrelicsphotography · 2 years ago
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CHATEAU VERDURE
This charming little castle, located in the chic suburbs of a metropolis, is a complete mystery as far as the history or background are concerned. I could find absolutely no information whatsoever. Considering the bad state of the building, it must have been empty for many years. The second floor can just barely be reached using the beautiful marble staircase, but anything beyond that has already collapsed, or is about to do so. Too dangerous in any case to be able to walk around safely. Unfortunately, the castle has not been spared from vandalism. Grafitti squirting idiots have accelerated the decline. Still very beautiful to see though, especially the entrance hall with the marble staircase and the decomposing piano.
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RITTERGUT V
This abandoned mansion was built around 1895 by order of the owner of a nearby weaving mill. Originally established as a summer residence, the country house served several purposes throughout history. For example, at the time of the Third Reich it was a Reich Labor Camp. After the war, the castle was transformed into a school for the training of judges, and later a “pioneer leadership school” was housed in it. In 2018, the beautiful building fell prey to the flames after a fire was started. The entire roof was destroyed. Fortunately, the staircase with the blue stucco ceiling, for which the building is known, was spared. 
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