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#vivek shraya
makingqueerhistory · 8 days ago
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And so, I’m also afraid of women. I’m afraid of women who’ve either emboldened or defended the men who have harmed me, or have watched in silence. I’m afraid of women who adopt masculine traits and then feel compelled to dominate or silence me at dinner parties. I’m afraid of women who see me as a predator and whose comfort I consequently put before my own by using male locker rooms. I’m afraid of women who have internalized their experiences of misogyny so deeply that they make me their punching bag. I’m afraid of the women who, like men, reject my pronouns and refuse to see my femininity, or who comment on or criticize my appearance, down to my chipped nail polish, to reiterate that I am not one of them. I’m afraid of women who, when I share my experiences of being trans, try to console me by announcing “welcome to being a woman,” refusing to recognize the ways in which our experiences fundamentally differ. But I’m especially afraid of women because my history has taught me that I can’t fully rely upon other women for sisterhood, or allyship, or protection from men.
Vivek Shraya, I'm Afraid of Men    
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words-and-coffee · 5 months ago
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Falling in love with another human is terrifying. As our language insists, romantic love is always preceded by a fall, the necessity of losing control and potentially hurting yourself in the process of connecting with another
Vivek Shraya, I'm Afraid of Men
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yourdailyqueer · a year ago
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Vivek Shraya
Gender: Transgender woman
Sexuality: N/A
DOB: 15 February 1981
Ethnicity: Indian
Occupation: Activist, songwriter, entrepreneur, musician, writer, artist 
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smokefalls · a year ago
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the only way to support folks when you have more privilege is to give power away (which means space, money/resources, and time).
Vivek Shraya, “conversations with white friends: sara quin amber dawn rae spoon dannielle owens-reid” from even this page is white
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thebooksaidthat · a year ago
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I have always been disturbed by this transition, by the reality that often the only way to capture someone’s attention and to encourage them to recognize their own internal biases (and to work to alter them) is to confront them with sensational stories of suffering. Why is my humanity only seen or cared about when I share the ways in which I have been victimized and violated?
Vivek Shraya, I’m Afraid of Men
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sagebaileyspeaks · a year ago
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Back on my book reviews again. 
I read The Subtweet a few weeks ago but have struggled with writing a review because while I like the premise and even initial execution, this is not a reading experience that I can honestly say I enjoyed. The narrative structure is a bit odd, the characters aren’t very likeable and when we get to the infamous subtweet the fallout and subsequent repercussions just don’t serve the narrative in a way that makes sense. 
And I want to clarify what I mean when I say “unlikeable characters,” while reading this novel I continued to forget that these characters are out of college and 30+ years old because they talk and act like teenagers. I’d never try to argue that social media discourse only affects the younger crowd but the type of inability to communicate properly as shown by the GROWN WOMEN in this book is just ridiculous. There’s little to no reason for this friendship to fall apart the way it did and issue of communication becomes more clear when the second piece of this friendship just disappears. 
Since I don’t want to do a spoiler review I will say that I appreciate what this novel is trying to do in regard to the larger discussion around colorism, representation and even to a certain extent, appropriation - but the bottom line is that it is just not executed well and it’s sticking with me for all of the wrong reasons, like how pretentious I find Neela and how juvenile RUK-MINI’s behavior was. 
I give it ⭐ ⭐ and a half out of five. 
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joejoereads · 12 months ago
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My First Impressions: The Subtweet by Vivek Shraya
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The Subtweet by Vivek Shraya My first impressions (Writing down my first impressions of the book. NOT an in-depth review. Reviews base on personal enjoyment.) RANK: Cool This book is ok. My biggest problem is that there are topics that are barely touch. The book talks about how POCs have tough time break in to the music industry, POC pandering to white people, the music industry using people and social media. While these are important topics, the author is more interested in Neela’s jealousy and her friendship with Rukmini. It’s like the author mentions the topic quickly but then moves on to focus on something else. The only topic that gets some talk is social media. Neela being too focus on likes and retweets does hurt her ability to make friends. I really like that. The fall out between Neela and Rukmini happens in the last few pages. I felt the tweet was anti climatic. On top of that, Neela is rewarded for starting the drama and ending Rukmini’s music career. None of the characters are interesting nor fun. Overall, the book feels disjoined as it wants to talk about many important topics but at the same time wants to focus on Neela and her jealousy. I would borrow this book from a Library (if it’s open and safe due to Covid) or Hoopla.
View all my GoodReads Reviews View all my StoryGraph Reviews
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joeyhazell-art · 2 years ago
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"In the absence of white he could see colour"
A little painting on learning to love yourself by loving others.
Inspired by the heartbreakingly beautiful "she of the mountains" by @vivekshraya
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ithasoul · 2 years ago
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LOVELOUD 2019
PHOTO CREDIT: CHARISSA CHE
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words-and-coffee · 2 months ago
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The pressure to be “good” is not exclusive to one gender, nor is it applied equally to all genders. To be clear, the stress on girls to be “good” far surpasses any stress men might feel to be “good.” This disparity is perhaps best exemplified by the fact that when a girl does something “wrong,” few mourn her goodness.We rarely hear, “I thought she was one of the good girls.” Women who behave “badly” are ultimately not given the same benefit of the doubt as men and are immediately cast off as bitches or sluts. Men might be written off as “dogs,” but their reckless behaviour is more often unnoticed, forgiven, or even celebrated—hence our cultural fixation with bad boys.
Vivek Shraya, I'm Afraid of Men
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sphingter · 2 years ago
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tristealven · a year ago
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— Vivek Shraya, She of the Mountains (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2014)
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smokefalls · a year ago
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my skin is brown to caution you of my fire.
Vivek Shraya, “vishvarupa” from even this page is white
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thebooksaidthat · a year ago
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What would my body look like if I didn’t want affection from gay men and protection from straight men? What would my body look and feel like if I didn’t have to mould it into both a shield and an ornament? How do I love a body that was never fully my own?
Vivek Shraya, I’m Afraid of Men
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tegayyandsara · 2 years ago
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breha · a year ago
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Part-Time Woman - Vivek Shraya & Queer Songbook Orchestra feat. Alok
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lesbijans · 2 years ago
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Have you read I'm Afraid of Men? Strongly recommend.
not yet but it's been on my list so thank you for the final push!!
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