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#weaving
shadowtherat · 2 days ago
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Donut doing another fun agility course - Donut loves agility courses (especially weaves!) and its always so much fun seeing her zip around the course!
Trick tutorial on how to train a rat to weave: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bz4EXnFa78
Trick tutorial on training a rat agility: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5Q-vAIpNME
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joelcooo · 16 hours ago
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eyeballapproved · 2 days ago
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Alexandre da Cunha
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onthegreenlandsea · 6 months ago
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i don't want a career, i want to do crafts
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rudolphsboyfriend · a month ago
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I love you crafts i love you bookbinding i love you pottery i love you carpentry i love you baking i love you leatherworking i love you embroidery i love you knitting i love you smithing i love you weaving I love you dyeing i love you glassblowing i love you gardening i love you art that doesn't get enough recognition as art
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wikdsushi-v2 · 27 days ago
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itscolossal · 23 days ago
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An Elaborately Designed Book on Weaving Opens to Reveal a Fully Functional Loom
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dog-teeth · 3 months ago
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Guardian/Fire-starter (2022)
Woven acrylic
30x35cm
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listen-to-the-trees · a month ago
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It took longer than I wanted and I’m not happy with the seams where the six pieces come together (oh for a bigger loom), but I HAVE A BLANKET!
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I have finished my ace blanket before the end of Pride month.
I am very happy with it. :)
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ashe-is-here · a year ago
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working with textiles is a trap. first they lure you in with knitting. then you pick up crochet (understandable enough). next you start getting curious in fiber. you learn how to spin (okay that’s a bit extra). weaving is cool, right? you now own a loom. heck, while we’re at it, why not starting making your own clothes (this is getting out of hand)? spinning is no longer enough for you — you need something stronger. you learn how to dye (stop i’m begging). dye is fun, but it’d be nice to have your own source of fiber. you are now a shepherd.
EDIT: this has unfortunately somehow found its way into terf circles. anyway op is trans and i hope all fellow trans people people have wonderful and lovely days.
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squid----s · 4 days ago
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Big Fig + Small Fig Progress
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equatorjournal · a month ago
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Maria Chojnacka At The Sea Shore, detail, 1973. Thread and seashells.
From “ Weaving, a handbook of the fiber arts” by Shirley Held, 1978.
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dwellordream · a year ago
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“Consider the Vikings. Popular feminist retellings like the History Channel’s fictional saga “Vikings” emphasize the role of women as warriors and chieftains. But they barely hint at how crucial women’s work was to the ships that carried these warriors to distant shores.
One of the central characters in “Vikings” is an ingenious shipbuilder. But his ships apparently get their sails off the rack. The fabric is just there, like the textiles we take for granted in our 21st-century lives. The women who prepared the wool, spun it into thread, wove the fabric and sewed the sails have vanished.
In reality, from start to finish, it took longer to make a Viking sail than to build a Viking ship. So precious was a sail that one of the Icelandic sagas records how a hero wept when his was stolen. Simply spinning wool into enough thread to weave a single sail required more than a year’s work, the equivalent of about 385 eight-hour days.
King Canute, who ruled a North Sea empire in the 11th century, had a fleet comprising about a million square meters of sailcloth. For the spinning alone, those sails represented the equivalent of 10,000 work years.”
“...Picturing historical women as producers requires a change of attitude. Even today, after decades of feminist influence, we too often assume that making important things is a male domain. Women stereotypically decorate and consume. They engage with people. They don’t manufacture essential goods.
Yet from the Renaissance until the 19th century, European art represented the idea of “industry” not with smokestacks but with spinning women. Everyone understood that their never-ending labor was essential. It took at least 20 spinners to keep a single loom supplied.
“The spinners never stand still for want of work; they always have it if they please; but weavers are sometimes idle for want of yarn,” the agronomist and travel writer Arthur Young, who toured northern England in 1768, wrote.
Shortly thereafter, the spinning machines of the Industrial Revolution liberated women from their spindles and distaffs, beginning the centuries-long process that raised even the world’s poorest people to living standards our ancestors could not have imagined.
But that “great enrichment” had an unfortunate side effect. Textile abundance erased our memories of women’s historic contributions to one of humanity’s most important endeavors. It turned industry into entertainment.
“In the West,” Dr. Harlow wrote, “the production of textiles has moved from being a fundamental, indeed essential, part of the industrial economy to a predominantly female craft activity.””
- Virginia Postrel, “Women and Men Are Like the Threads of a Woven Fabric.” in The New York Times
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grocerystore-gf · a year ago
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one last stop by casey mcquiston // From Eden - Hozier // 39 ways that i love u - “The Beatrice Letters” (a series of unfortunate events) ~ lemony snicket // Hans Makart - Detail from Musikalische Unterhaltung , 1874 // Edgar Allan Poe //39 ways that i love u - “The Beatrice Letters” (a series of unfortunate events) ~ lemony snicket // Cornelia Street - taylor swift // nobody - Hozier // via instagram @artqueerhabibi // this love - taylor swift // Antony Gormley //
requested by @whinysstuff
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smokedsugar · 9 months ago
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Sweetgrass basket woven by Gullah Geechee artist Corey Alston
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babyfern99 · 7 months ago
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Weaving
1928
Gunta Stölzl
source
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kaalbela · 6 months ago
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Aari, also known as Zalakdozi is a form of embroidery originating from Kashmir. The word zalokdozi means chain stitch. Aari embroidery involves only the chain stitch done in concentric rings to fill a pattern. Zalakdozi typically uses wool, cotton, or silk thread. It is done not using a needle, but a hook known as ‘ari’. Using a hook to do this embroidery saves on time and energy as the hook is used to pull a series of loops of the chain stitch, as against the single loops that have to be done using a needle.
1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 | textile series
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