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#wuthering heights
in-a-nebula · 2 days ago
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it is not enough to love you. it is not enough to want you destroyed
wuthering heights- emily brontë// hanif abdurraqib// killing eve// blood-hozier// sophokles, from elektra, an oresteia: agamemnon// jennifer's body// kiss with a fist- florence+the machine// joan tierney// when rome falls- yves olade// i set it in stone- venetta octavia
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brontefanaticc · a day ago
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wow, ok, unfollowing now. was a big fan of his plan for revenge to those families who wronged him, but had no idea it extended to the next generation and forcing two teens to get married against their will.
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The Entail on Thrushcross Grange
https://youtu.be/SPFeB2bOO-0
youtube
So I have just watched this really good informative video on entails on British estates in the 19th century. I didn’t previously know about the “Tenant for Life” - “Real Inheritor” distinction, I have thought that once established the entail on the estate went on forever and couldn’t be broken. But apparently not. This new knowledge made me understand Heathcliff’s plan to get Thrushcross Grange better.
“A great addition, in my eyes, was his being left without an heir. I bemoaned that, as I gazed on the feeble orphan; and I mentally abused old Linton for (what was only natural partiality) the securing his estate to his own daughter, instead of his son’s.”
(Chapter 16, Wuthering Heights)
Here we pretty much learn that Mr. Linton, Edgar’s father, was responsible for signing the current entail on Thrushcross Grange. He signed it so that Isabella and her son took precedence over Edgar’s daughter. As the above video says, the next unborn son on the inheriting line at the moment of entail’s signing is the Real Inheritor who can do whatever he wants with the estate (sell it, bequeath it to anyone they want etc). Thus Linton is the Real Inheritor of Thrushcross Grange and he will be entitled to do whatever he wants with it once he turns 21. Heathcliff knows this:
“Yes, Nell,’ he added, when they had departed, ‘my son is prospective owner of your place, and I should not wish him to die till I was certain of being his successor.”
(Chapter 20, Wuthering Heights)
If Linton lives till 21 years of age and until after Edgar dies, Heathcliff can easily manipulate him into bequeathing the estate to himself.
“‘My design is as honest as possible. I’ll inform you of its whole scope,’ he said. ‘That the two cousins may fall in love, and get married. I’m acting generously to your master: his young chit has no expectations, and should she second my wishes she’ll be provided for at once as joint successor with Linton.’
‘If Linton died,’ I answered, ‘and his life is quite uncertain, Catherine would be the heir.’
‘No, she would not,’ he said. ‘There is no clause in the will to secure it so: his property would go to me; but, to prevent disputes, I desire their union, and am resolved to bring it about.’”
(Chapter 21, Wuthering Heights)
Heathcliff desires Catherine and Linton to marry because he rightfully fears that Linton will die before 21 and before Edgar dies and that he won’t inherit the estate. By marrying him to Catherine he is securing that Catherine will be a Heathcliff under his authority and that her movable property will be in his grasp, so after Edgar and Linton’s deaths no one has the power to question him owning Thrushcross Grange. And this is exactly what ends up happening.
“Heathcliff went up once, to show her Linton’s will. He had bequeathed the whole of his, and what had been her, moveable property, to his father: the poor creature was threatened, or coaxed, into that act during her week’s absence, when his uncle died. The lands, being a minor, he could not meddle with. However, Mr. Heathcliff has claimed and kept them in his wife’s right and his also: I suppose legally; at any rate, Catherine, destitute of cash and friends, cannot disturb his possession.”
(Chapter 30, Wuthering Heights)
All of Catherine’s money became Linton’s after the marriage per the law and Linton left all of it to his father. He couldn’t bequeath Thrushcross Grange to his father since he couldn’t technically bequeath it before the age of 21 and he died around the age of 17. So Heathcliff can’t actually inherit it via his son’s will but Catherine doesn’t have any money, all of it is Heathcliff’s now, so she doesn’t have the resources to get a lawyer, and they live in the middle of nowhere anyway. So Heathcliff comes to own Thrushcross Grange.
I have been obsessing over this book for so many years and for the first time I have fully understood Heathcliff’s scheme to get Thrushcross Grange. The concept of the “Real Inheritor” was the puzzle piece I was missing.
If Linton hadn’t died before his 21st birthday (and if Heathcliff hadn’t kidnapped Cathy I guess) all of Heathcliff’s schemes throughout the novel would be perfectly legal.
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booksandothersecrets · 9 months ago
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Normalise liking poetry because you like the way it sounds and art because you think its beautiful. You don’t have to understand the deeper meaning of something to appreciate it - poetry is bloody difficult to analyse and art requires an extensive knowledge of movements and artists to properly get - so please just wonder around art galleries and decide which pieces you’d buy if you could, and read out lines of poetry simply because they have a nice ring to them.
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three-sugars-pls · 11 months ago
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I wish everyone would admit that classic literature is inherently difficult to read, and that you shouldn’t feel stupid if you don’t “get it”. Especially the dark academia/ classic lit fandoms and stuff. Like unless you have the vocabulary and pop culture knowledge of an 18th century nobleman, it’s going to be a tough read. It’ll take you longer to read; you’re not stupid if you’ve spent several months on a single book! And you don’t have to enjoy everything. It’s okay if you got bored after one chapter of Wuthering Heights, and couldn’t be bothered to read the rest. It’s okay if you want to read your favourite kids book for the 10th time instead. You’re not stupid. No piece of literature is inherently better, more “important”, more “meaningful”, or more “intellectual” than another. First and foremost, read what brings you joy.
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something--pretentious · a month ago
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A Line made by Walking , Sara Baume //August - taylor swift , edit by @lilacsblossom the unabridged journals of sylvia plath- Sylvia Plath// Wuthering Heights ~Emily Brontë//Mary Oliver from “August”, devotions // Letters of Summer Past by Listy Tamtego Lata VI // august by taylor swift , edit by @lilacsblossom // Mary Oliver , the pond // Gone Girl - Gillian Flynn // the secret life of bees - Sue Monk Kidd// August 3 , 4pm -im not ready//
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saintmelangell · 3 months ago
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teens in 1848 be like “dni if you read degenerate literature like w/uthering h/eights”
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bitterbloodrose · 7 months ago
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soulmates
emily brontë, wuthering heights // nfwmb, hozier // madeline miller, the song of achilles // rumi // louis tomlinson, habit // plato, the symposium // sarah perry, the essex serpent // sleeping at last, turning page // leo tolstoy, anna karenina // percy shelley, prometheus unbound
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mrdarcysdadbod · 5 months ago
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Jane "I can fix him" Eyre vs Cathy "I can make him worse" Earnshaw
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opheliashes · 2 months ago
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On Childhood Nostalgia & Growing Up 
Stoned at the Nail Salon, Lorde // Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery // Landslide, Fleetwood Mac // Seven, Taylor Swift // Little Women, Dir. Greta Gerwig // Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë 
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vasileus-vasileon · 2 months ago
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You are the knife I turn inside myself; that is love.
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I confuse instinct for desire — isn’t bite also touch?
because you want to die for love, you always have
Georges Bataille, Guilty / The Lovers, Akseli Gallen / Richard Siken, Wishbone / Shakespeare, Pericles / scene from Eiichi Yamamoto’s Belladonna of Sadness (1973) / Franz Kafka, Letters to Milena / Safet Zec, 1943 | Allegories of Fate / Marina Tsvetaeva, from Poem of the End: V / Carmen. Ill. Alastair. / Emily Brontë, from, “Wuthering Heights,” / Carmen. Ill. Alastair. / Natalie Diaz, Postcolonial Love Poem / Richard Siken
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metamorphesque · a month ago
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There are no people in what I've written. Only ghosts. — Susan Sontag
1. mahmoud darwish | 2. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 3. sylvia plath | 4. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 5. emily brontë | 6. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 7. harry styles | 8. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 9. kathleen graber | 10. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 11. ovid | 12. a ghost story (2017, david lowery) | 13. richard siken
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bad-dreams-in-the-night · 5 months ago
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mads mikkelsen dancing to wuthering heights
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sentimentalbot · 10 months ago
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“You said I killed you— haunt me, then! Be with me always— take any form— drive me mad! Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!”
Emily Brontë, from, “Wuthering Heights,” originally published in 1847
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