Tumgir
#ya contemporary
brightbeautifulthings · 6 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff
"I guess there was a war going on somewhere in the world that night but it wasn't one that could touch us."
Year Read: 2022
Rating: 2/5
About: Fifteen-year-old Daisy goes from Manhattan to England to stay with her cousins and escape her father's dreadful new wife. The day after her aunt leaves on business, bombs are falling and the country is occupied by a mysterious foreign enemy. It takes a while for the war to reach the idyllic countryside where Daisy and her cousins spend their days without any supervision, but when it does, her life is transformed into the barest form of survival, with only one goal in mind: reunite with her newfound family. Trigger warnings: death (graphic), animal death (on-page), incest, war, explosions, guns, starvation, eating disorders (anorexia), depression, PTSD, trauma.
Thoughts: This book is so oddly written that I feel like it's either really going to appeal to someone or really not appeal to them, and unfortunately I'm on the latter end. The rating isn't a reflection of its worth, just my enjoyment of it (or lack thereof), since it's well-done, and I suspect it would be great in a classroom or for readers who struggle with longer, traditional narratives. But just about everything in this book is something I don't care for in my fiction. To begin with, I'm not fond of war or survival stories (too ubiquitous in real life, too ubiquitous in fiction, respectively). I also don't enjoy short chapters, since I feel like they pull me out of the story.
I realize that the narration is meant to sound juvenile, in contrast to the narrator's growth at the end, but it works a little too well. I felt like I was listening to a badly told story from the perspective of someone who only had the vaguest idea of what was going on, which is true-- Daisy never clarifies who the war is with or why it starts, and we're meant to believe it's because she doesn't know. In a world saturated with news and media, I find that hard to believe, but okay. Teenagers aren't as disengaged as we like to think; they're often more invested in issues than adults, but war is ultimately meaningless, yeah, yeah... While her train of thought is often funny, it's not often insightful or informative, and it's all tell and no show. I never had the sense that I was experiencing the events along with her.
I did enjoy the characters and the little bits of magical realism though. Rosoff does a nice job capturing a teenage voice with Daisy, and while she's initially quite selfish, watching her genuinely come to care for her cousins is a nice arc. I wished we'd gotten to spend more time with Edmond (without the weird sexual relationship), but I really liked Piper's sweetness and her bond with Daisy. However, I think the novel tries to take on too many issues (e.g., incest, eating disorders) without really doing justice to them which, again, I realize is intentional. The heart of this novel is basically the grim reality of survival, and everything else is less important by comparison. But, like I said, that's not something I particularly enjoy in my fiction.
8 notes · View notes
paperbacktomes · 16 days ago
Text
The right song sinks its teeth in us and makes us feel in places we thought were numb.
— Laekan Zea Kemp, Heartbreak Symphony
1 note · View note
belle-keys · a month ago
Text
"Anger doesn't really cover what I feel, though... What's the word for when someone drinks so much, they are ruining your best friend's life? Or the word for a man so vengeful about his own past that he wants to destroy your future? What's the word for a woman who was sick for months, but refused to go to the doctor until it was too late? The word for a girl at school whose personal mission is to mess with your head? Anger's not the right word. Rage. That's what this feeling is, eating me up."
- All My Rage by Sabaa Tahir (2022)
8 notes · View notes
just-thinking-about-stufff · 2 months ago
Text
So I finished Solitaire by Alice Oseman and let me tell you.
That shit hit different.
10 notes · View notes
caffeinatedcapi · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Title: Eliza and Her Monsters Author: Francesca Zappia Genre: YA contemporary My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Synopsis: Eliza’s online and offline lives couldn’t be more different. At school, she’s shy and meek, barely a blip on most people’s radar. Online, she’s practically worshiped, a mysterious artist who penned Monstrous Sea, an internet sensation with millions of fans worldwide. When she makes a new friend at school, though, and finds out that he’s Monstrous Sea’s BNF fanfiction author, Eliza’s two worlds are colliding.
Review: I empathized with Eliza almost immediately. A socially-anxious creative introvert addicted to escapism, she really hit home. There were times I got fed-up with Eliza, wanting to see her look up from her screens and live in the world for a moment and see that she’s not forced into separation - she chooses it.
When it came to her friends, who she met online, it was hard to tell if they were merely faceless characters that existed only to stroke Eliza’s ego and offer advice, or if this was purposeful writing on Zappia’s part. As I got towards the end, I saw that it was the latter and was very glad for that.
Eliza lives in her head so much and is so used to mainly interacting with fictional characters that she pulls the strings of that it slips her mind to consider others’ feelings and issues. I loved seeing her realize this and actively try to change, even if her fall was heart-wrenching at first, feeling too close to home.
Wallace was an amazing character as well, and I loved meeting his family as Eliza got closer to him and slowly exited her shell with his help. He was there for her, supported her (even when he didn’t know her online persona), but he lets her know that she hides insider herself too much and that it isn’t healthy and stands by this even when it ends up in a fight.
Their relationship feels true and right. Both have anxieties when it comes to being social, and Wallace even has trouble talking when in public and resorts to writing instead, which Eliza has no problem with, not being the biggest fan of speaking herself. They grow into each other and with each other.
One topic I definitely enjoyed was burning out, or being blocked, and feeling, as a creator, beholden to your audience to keep going - and the guilt that results when continuing just ends up hurting, forcing you to take a break or even stop entirely. The creator Eliza reaches out to tells her to find inspiration in the world - her favorite books, shows, movies, or simply by living life.
And so Eliza lives, and creates.
Eliza and her Monsters was an immediate favorite from start to finish, and I loved the artwork from Eliza’s webcomic spaced throughout. The 4 stars instead of 5 is only because the Big fight between Eliza and Wallace... there were parts of it that made Wallace sound in the right when he wasn’t, and I didn’t like how that got swept away. It felt like Zappia was getting close towards the end and was rushing a bit.
Content warning for those who read the book: Suicide is talked about when Wallace tells Eliza about his backstory, and Eliza ends up dealing with suicidal ideation when life for her turns on its head.
4 notes · View notes
weird-0 · 3 months ago
Text
You snuck into my heart and now you're punching holes into it
Let's Talk About Love by Claire Kann
0 notes
jessread-s · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
qotd: “I’ll survive this. I’ll live. But there’s a hole in me, never to be filled. Maybe that’s why people die of old age. Maybe we could live forever if we didn’t love so completely. But we do. And by the time old age comes, we’re filled with holes. So many that our insides aren’t even ours anymore. We’re just one big empty space, waiting to be filled by the darkness. Waiting to be free.” — Sabaa Tahir - 𝐑𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ - Sabaa Tahir draws from her own lived experiences to create this heart-wrenching novel and I cannot even begin to express how powerful it is. “All My Rage” needs to be read and it needs to be taught. The novel is told from the perspective of three different characters—Misbah, Salahudin, and Noor—spanning across generations. They are all intertwined by faith, friendship, and the real issues they grapple with (many of which tore my heart right out of my chest) as they navigate life in the United States as Pakistani-Americans. Misbah, Salahudin’s mother, has many hopes and dreams. But after tragedy strikes, her husband, whom she was arranged to marry, becomes an alcoholic. She struggles to shield her son in a foreign country and seek the treatment she needs to combat her newly diagnosed kidney disease. Noor’s family dies in an earthquake in Pakistan. She is forced to abandon her culture when she moves into her uncle’s house in the United States. She experiences physical abuse under his care and discrimination at school. Salahudin loses his mom to disease and his father to alcohol. He nearly loses his Noor, his best friend, when he is caught dealing drugs to afford the expenses surrounding his family’s motel. I seriously cannot say enough about this book. It left me broken. “All My Rage” is definitely Tahir’s best work. She leaves the reader feeling raw and I admire her strength in telling this story. If you have not read this book yet, I urge you to do so. The representation provided by this novel is extremely important, as it reflects the hardships experienced by so many immigrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds in the United States.
-
Cross-posted to: Instagram | Amazon | Goodreads | StoryGraph
5 notes · View notes
monochrome-anomaly · 4 months ago
Text
can't believe noor and salahuddin invented love
4 notes · View notes
jenryland · 4 months ago
Text
Review of Very Bad People
Review of Very Bad People
I really enjoyed Kit Frick’s debut YA book. What did I think of her new YA suspense novel, Very Bad People? I’m here to tell you! Check out my review of Very Bad People! (more…)
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
0 notes
brightbeautifulthings · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Family of Liars by E. Lockhart
"I'd think of these images-- people dying, a city drowning-- instead of thinking about Rosemary, dying, drowning. They let me hurt without looking at my own life. If I didn't think about them, I'd have never stopped thinking about her."
Year Read: 2022
Rating: 3/5
About: Carrie is the oldest of the Sinclair sisters, and she's always been the least sure of her place among them. The summer she's seventeen, her cousin, Yardley, brings three boys to the island for the summer, and Carrie's life will never be the same. Still reeling from the death of her youngest sister, Rosemary, Carrie falls fast and hard for the charming, rakish Pfeff. But when the summer ends in another tragedy, the Sinclair family is pushed to their limits. They were always liars. Trigger warnings: character death (on-page), child/sibling death, drowning, violence, severe injury, addiction/alcoholism/drug use, homophobia, infidelity, grief.
Thoughts: I've read a couple of Lockhart's books since We Were Liars that I didn't like as much, but I don't think I realized the extent to which she changes up her style from book to book until I opened up this one. Damn if I didn't feel like I'd been transported immediately back to Beechwood Island. The characters are different, but the tone is the same, and that was what I liked best about Family of Liars: the dreamy, poetic writing, the beautiful, flawed, and selfish characters, and the feeling that I had temporarily stepped outside of my life and into a world of sunshine and privilege. More than plot, it has atmosphere going for it.
Unfortunately, I don't think the plot particularly shines, especially alongside the first book. In a cast of mostly unlikeable characters, it's extremely difficult to like Carrie's love interest, and that relationship ruined a lot of my reading experience. Despite their many shortcomings, I find the Sinclair family dynamics fascinating. They have everything except maybe happiness, and there's not a single one among them who knows how to handle grief or even acknowledge it. I like the many small mysteries that are uncovered over the course of the novel, in between charming but pointless family events, but it mostly feels like an intense character study of Carrie and how, to some extent, she represents the family as a whole.
I also love the casual way ghosts are included in the story, but that's me. We're free to draw our own conclusions about whether those are real or an expression of grief and guilt. Overall, it's a bit forgettable and I didn't love it the way I loved We Were Liars, but there were things I enjoyed about it on its own. I think it's a mistake to market it as a thriller though; the book might have a body count, but the deaths themselves aren't really the point. Family of Liars is all about how you live with them afterward.
8 notes · View notes
paperbacktomes · 3 months ago
Text
Dreaming isn’t just the start of a movement, it’s the engine that keeps it going.
— Laekan Zea Kemp, Heartbreak Symphony
1 note · View note
simoneandherbooks · 5 months ago
Text
All My Rage by Sabaa Tahir // Book Review
All My Rage by Sabaa Tahir // Book Review
I just shared my thoughts with a friend and my review went basically like this: Now, I’m not usually the type to express my emotions through gifs, but I’m making an exception for this book. Thanks to Penguin Teen for a gifted copy of this book. Here’s more about All My Rage Lahore, Pakistan. Then.Misbah is a dreamer and storyteller, newly married to Toufiq in an arranged match. After their…
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
3 notes · View notes
dark-ink-drinker · 5 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
This book is a bit of a monster for a YA romance at 462 pages. And it reads a little slower than I find most YA read. I can't lie, while cute, What f
With the exception of What If It's Us, I've never read anything by Becky Albertalli but I've read a few of Adam Silvera's books. In fact, the reason I first read What if It's Us is because I enjoy Adam Silvera's books so much.
So quick review, Ben and Arthur's story starts with a meet-cute in a post office during summer, when Arthur is in town interning and Ben is mailing a box of things back to his cheating ex-boyfriend. It's quite an adventure how they meet, lose each other, find each other again and half a HUGE roller coaster of a whirlwind. They fall in love quickly and intensely.... and I don't mean to ruin it but they don't end up together in the end. Which is fine, not all love stories are forever love stories and while I really love them together, it was sort of refreshing to have a non-Hollywood, rom com ending. It felt a bit more real.
Cut to Here's To Us-- they are still not together and despite their promises to one another, they're friends in title only. When it starts, they haven't talked in months. Arthur has a boyfriend who he seems to be perfect with, Mikey, and Ben is in a sort-of thing with the hot, hot Mario. Ben is trying to figure out the rewrite of his epic fantasy wizard novel and find his place in a city that seems to be suffocating him. And Arthur is trying to fit himself into this relationship with Mikey and interning once again in New York, only this time at a off Broadway play.
Cue the panic over being in the same city and seeing Ex-turned friend. Cue all the old friends who know the whole history and all their opinions on a do-over, and two boys who are new to the story and don't quite get the powerful force that is Ben and Arthur.
This book is a bit of a monster for a YA romance at 462 pages. And it reads a little slower than I find most YA read. I can't lie, while cute, What If It's Us and Here's To Us are my least favorite out of the Adam Silvera books I've read. I'm not sure if it's the collaborative writing or the lack of twist he usually has with his reality with a touch of dystopian/surreal details. It's good and I do find myself caring about the characters. I love their quirks and their humor and the realness of their family and friend relationships. But the story all falls a little... flat. The story is packed with emotions yet, it feels surface level still. I'm not sure what makes it feel that way. I wish I could pinpoint it. I don't regret reading it though.
I always forget when I'm sitting down to start a new book to have a pen or highlighter for my favorite lines-- until i hit a line that hits hardest and then I'm already halfway or further in. But I did catch a couple in this one that stood out.
The one that really stuck out to me feels like a real-life lesson. "I guess sometimes that's how it goes, though. Sometimes happily ever afters aren't about your happiness at all." It was Arthur thinking Mario was Ben's final draft. He wanted Ben to have his happily ever after, even if it meant something devastating to himself. It's a powerful thing to realize that someone could get their own happy ending despite it not bringing your own happiness, and it's even harder to realize that you need to be ok with that.
I won't ruin the ending. Despite my mixed review, I would still say it's worth a read. A solid ⭐️⭐️⭐️ to ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 1/2
0 notes
caffeinatedcapi · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Title: Run Author: Kody Keplinger Genre: YA realistic fiction My Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Synopsis: Agnes Atwood has never gone on a date, never even stayed out past ten, and never broken any of her parents’ overbearing rules. Rules that are meant to protect their legally blind daughter—protect her from what, Agnes isn’t quite sure. Despite everything, Bo and Agnes become best friends. And it’s the sort of friendship that runs truer and deeper than anything else. So when Bo shows up in the middle of the night, with police sirens wailing in the distance, desperate to get out of town, Agnes doesn’t hesitate to take off with her. But running away and not getting caught will require stealing a car, tracking down Bo’s dad, staying ahead of the authorities, and—worst of all—confronting some ugly secrets. (from Goodreads)
Review: I got interested in this book after reading an excerpt at the back of Keplinger’s other book That’s NOT What Happened. I love her characterizations, and Agnes’s and Bo’s voices feel strong and organic. It almost feels like different people wrote the alternating chapters (without them clashing), which I loved, seeing as Agnes and Bo are such different people.
I’m not typically a fan of mixed-perspective books, but Keplinger did it really well, Bo’s chapters focusing on the present and Agnes’s chapters focusing on the past.
Bo and Agnes come from a tiny town, where college is a pipe dream for most, and Agnes longs to leave Mursey behind. As far as she can see, though, this is nothing but a dream.
Legally blind due to a genetic illness, Agnes is often home-bound, not even trusted to walk the block from her school’s bus stop by herself.
She meets Bo after a strike of rebellion leads her to wander around the woods behind her house, something she had been explicitly told not to do by her mom. As her mom had fearfully predicted, Agnes ended up lost, but Bo found her, and with her knowledge of the woods, she was able to lead Agnes back home.
The friendship between Bo and Agnes grabbed me right away, and while she first hadn’t known anything about Agnes’s disability besides knowing she needed a cane and occasionally a guide, Bo quickly accepted it without even thinking of babying her or treating her like a burden, something Agnes had felt like with her other friend, Christy.
Agnes’s need to appear cool and a rebel in order to impress Bo brought me back to my own high school years, both for better and worse. I really enjoyed seeing her grow up, at the same time that Bo seemed to have to remain stagnant or even regress in order to really grow as a person at the end. It’s an interesting and entertaining dynamic, and while I wanted to shake Bo at times, it was because I’d grown to really care about her and wanted to see her get her win.
I definitely recommend this book and will likely find myself reading through it again in the future.
0 notes
jvstlikemagic · 6 months ago
Quote
I can feel printed words seeping through my skin and into my veins, rushing to my heart and marking it forever. I want to savor this wonder, this happening of loving a book and reading it for the first time is always the best, and I will never read this book for the first time ever again.
If He Had Been with Me, Laura Nowlin
6 notes · View notes
academic-nyctophile · 6 months ago
Text
“humans are complicated beasts, the monster said. How can a queen be both a good witch and a bad witch? How can a prince be a murderer and a saviour? How can an apothecary be evil-tempered but right-thinking? How can a parson be wrong-thinking but good-hearted? How can invisible men make themselves more lonely by being seen?”
- Patrick Ness, a monster calls
Tumblr media
63 notes · View notes