Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#youth
365filmsbyauroranocte · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Killer of Sheep (Charles Burnett, 1978)
2K notes · View notes
litaratura · 18 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Lorde on the Passing of Time – Ribs (2013) - Mood Ring (2021) - Secrets From A Girl (Who's Seen It All) (2021)
577 notes · View notes
p4radox99 · 12 months ago
Text
Take that MAGA mfs. You should read your own flag code! You know the one that says, you being oh so patriotic by wearing your flag, is against the code. That burning the flag is the preferable way to destroy it when it is in bad shape.
So stfu republican bozos, - I am of course referring to the Trump supporters who know nothing of their own history, refuses to learn and are willing to replay former mistakes and kill millions of people because their heads are so far up their asses they can see sunlight shine through their teeth, every time they open their mouth to talk about how they have the right to shoot, murder and beat up anyone that isn’t republican or white or male or straight or cisgender and all the rest of us abominations. Because they aren’t Americans, they are sinners etc etc. When you are the ones holding the country back from being ‘great’. You are the ones disrespecting the flag and making everyone miserable. Why don’t you admit defeat and get the fuck out of office and leave the Youth to pick up the pieces as you’ve always done and will unfortunately, most likely always do.
5K notes · View notes
godwantsit · 6 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
1K notes · View notes
macrolit · a month ago
Quote
When I had youth I had no money; now I have the money I have no time; and when I get the time, if I ever do, I shall have no health to enjoy life.
Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) American writer
791 notes · View notes
tomebuluku · 11 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
I am deeply proud of my Nigerian brothers and sisters. For the past few days, protests have erupted across the country to send one message to the government.
End SARS now. End Police Brutality. Protect our Women. Protect the Youth.
No Government is above the people they Govern. 
Spread the message. Stand in solidarity with Nigerians. 
4K notes · View notes
scifi-fantasy-horror · 7 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
by  Cole Marchetti
1K notes · View notes
molkolsdal · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Facing Death Threats, Afghanistan’s First Female Conductor Plays On
By Maija Liuhto
16.6.17
At 12 years old, Negin Khpalwak decided she wanted to study music. Then, her uncles threatened to kill her.
Khpalwak, now 20, is from the restive Kunar province in Eastern Afghanistan. I meet her in a classroom in Kabul, where she sits behind a grand piano surrounded by young women and girls clutching violins, clarinets, and cellos. Khpalwak listens to Lauren Braithwaite, a woodwind teacher originally from the UK, as she leads a rehearsal session of Zohra, Afghanistan’s first women’s orchestra, which is a project of the Afghanistan National Institute of Music, or ANIM.
“Violins, I love you to death – but C is still not right,” Braithwaite says as the young women rehearse the section again.
Typically, Khpalwak stands in Braithwaite’s place, holding a baton in front of her classroom of women; she is the first female conductor in Afghanistan.
Last year, Khpalwak’s orchestra shot to fame after their debut international performance at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Like Khpalwak, many of the young women in her orchestra faced challenges just convincing their families to allow them to study and practice music—let alone travel abroad. But Braithwaite says the trip was a success. “The reception was overwhelming,” she remembers. “We had crowds of people wanting encores. They were coming right up to the stage. It was like we were a famous band.”
But all of this would have been unthinkable only 16 years ago. The Taliban, who ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until US invasion in 2001, strictly banned all forms of music, and women were not allowed to participate in activities outside of the home, including studying at schools or universities.
As a young girl, the thought of studying music had never crossed Khpalwak’s mind. “I had seen many female singers, but I’d never seen a woman play an instrument in Afghanistan,” she says.
Despite cultural and political shifts in Afghanistan since the end of Taliban rule, many still believe music to be against Islam—especially when it comes to female performers. When Khpalwak decided she wanted to join ANIM, she was fearful of her parents’ reaction, but it was actually her uncles who threatened her life. “[My uncles] were saying, ‘We will kill you. Wherever we see you, we will kill you,’” Khpalwak remembers. “They think girls should stay at home and that Muslims can’t play music.”
Luckily, however, Khpalwak spent the majority of her teenage years away from her uncles, as her family moved her to an orphanage in Kabul when she was nine years old so that she would be closer to opportunities for education.
The idea behind ANIM, which also provides a regular school curriculum for students, extends beyond reviving music in Afghanistan after the Taliban rule. “One of the objectives of the program is to rebuild and improve the lives of disadvantaged kids and to make a small contribution towards empowering girls and women through music and education,” explains Ahmad Sarmast, founder and director of AMIN.
When ANIM opened its doors in 2010, the majority of students came from orphanages or poor, rural families. “They come from far away provinces where there are no schools – even for boys,” says Sarmast. “That’s why many of these girls ended up in orphanages [in the capital]. Their families care for their future and education.”
“After joining ANIM, I didn’t go back home for a long time because my uncles created problems for me,” Khpalwak says. Today, she says her immediate family also lives in Kabul, due to threats from her uncles.
Braithwaite says this sort of sacrifice is not atypical for students at ANIM—and particularly the girls. “These students are sacrificing relationships, they’re going against their families, and they’re perhaps having to move away from their families to be able to do what they’re doing,” she says.
In 2014, students of ANIM were targeted by a suicide bomber while giving a performance at the French cultural center in Kabul, killing one and injuring several others. According to Sarmast, who was injured in the attack, there are still credible threats toward the institute.
But Khpalwak believes in leading by example, and she hopes one day of opening a national orchestra for Afghanistan. “If we are scared and sit at home, we can’t progress and we can’t open the door for others.”
268 notes · View notes
politijohn · 5 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
We’re coming for your centrist Democrats too
555 notes · View notes