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can’t stand the phantom of the opera. oh, you’re haunting this opera house?? how about you go haunt some bitches instead. ffs.
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Say “fairy-tale gothic” and you immediately have my interest. Add a seaside setting and I am even more excited.
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JOMP Book Photo Challenge || January 23 || Set In Winter: Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George
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Day 23: JOMPBPC: Set In Winter Summer
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The 2022 Australia YA releases are here! I’ve been hanging out for this list and can’t wait to see what wonderful novels Aussie writers have in store for us this year :D
if you’re outside Australia & New Zealand but are still interested in some of the books on the list, consider recommending them to your local and/or school library! I know how hard it can be to get physical copies of OzYA in the US and UK but please consider supporting Australian YA because there is some incredible stuff being written here and it deserves worldwide recognition <3
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Review: Sick Kids in Love by Hannah Moskowitz Rating: 4/5
“I’m sick,” I say, “And I don’t wish I wasn’t. And I don’t really care how uncomfortable that makes you anymore.”
Isabel Garfinkel is too busy to date, thank you very much. She’s in the middle of her junior year, working on the school paper, volunteering at the hospital and managing her rheumatoid arthritis as well as she can. But when she meets a boy named Sasha, she begins to realise she could be handling some things a whole lot better.
I’ve started this book so many times. I enjoyed it every time I picked it up but I was always terrified it would turn out ableist and poorly researched like Moskowitz’s attempt at representing cystic fibrosis in Teeth. Thankfully, Moskowitz has put the effort in and brought us a beautiful book about living with illness and how often being sick isn’t the most complicated part of a person’s life.
Isabel is a wonderfully complex character and it was kind of an honour to read about her embracing her disability. Though I could’ve done with even one conversation about how she and Sasha are disabled. They’d talk about being sick or chronically ill but neither ever used the D-word in a positive light, none of them ever named the ableism they faced as ableism. For a book primarily about how it’s okay to be disabled, it sure had a problem with using the word disabled.
Aside from that, I did love this. Isabel and Sasha’s romance is brutal and beautiful and so realistic. They argue and they work through things and they support each other beautifully. The emotional maturity is off the charts and I loved reading about that. I also enjoyed how they just had fun with each other, how they felt at home with one another and were able to boost each other up when their illnesses were giving them the run around.
There are also some wonderful conversations around what makes a good parent which was interesting to see, especially the way Moskowitz let that subplot unfold. The stuff with Isabel’s mother did feel a little unfinished and it was a red flag when Sasha’s dad let the nurses put him in physical restraints at the hospital but overall that theme was good, and so necessary when disabled kids have such a deep reliance on their parents to help them manage and deal with their conditions.
A wonderful novel that’s still made it into my favourites but would’ve benefited greatly from a bit more disabled pride.          
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I’m switching over to StoryGraph in 2022!
I tried to do this last year but SG was still a bit buggy and wonky and my Goodreads import just made a mess of my shelves. so I’m starting again with empty shelves and I’m just gonna add the books I read as I read them. so if you want to keep track of what I’m reading, add me or follow me or however it works lol
I’ll still be using Goodreads to track upcoming releases but my current reads, reading updates and reviews will be exclusively on StoryGraph!
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Day 22: JOMPBPC: Caused A Book Hangover
Currently reading! 💕
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Shelf-Confidence BPC January 2022 | 22. World building
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Shelf-Confidence BPC | January 2022 | 22. World Building 
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Review: Being Miss Nobody by Tamsin Winter Rating: 4/5
"There's a time for being quiet, and there's a time for speaking up."
Rosalind can't speak even though she definitely wants to. Her head is constantly clouded with words she wants to say to her teachers, her classmates, her therapist, but her mouth just won't co-operate. She's dreading starting secondary school and her fears are realised when she's met with nothing but bullying. So she decides to try writing things down instead of saying them out loud and thus, Miss Nobody is born.
This was a lovely story about how not being able to speak doesn't mean you have nothing to say. I loved reading about Rozzie trying to find the courage to speak and finding ways to get around it when she couldn't quite manage. Her second therapist, Octavia, was amazing and the perfect example of how a therapist should be, especially for kids.
It was interesting how Winter wrote about Rozzie being bullied, turning into a bit of a bully herself, and then learning from her mistakes - something her actual bullies never learned themselves. And it was great that Winter never tried to explain away Rozzie's selective mutism - it was just a part of her and it made her who she was, even if that made things a little difficult sometimes.
I also loved that we had a character with cancer, who died, but wasn't for one second turned into inspiration porn. The whole time I was holding my breath, waiting for the character to inspire Rozzie to start speaking or, later, to apologise for the mistakes she'd made, but it never happened. Rozzie's only inspiration was herself and her own conscience which meant the character with cancer felt more realistic and was allowed to have their own journey. Way more meaningful than when a disabled character dies so the other characters Learn a Lesson.
But having said that, I think there was a missed opportunity here. It would've been great to see a bit of a discussion about how different disabilities are treated differently by people in society. Rozzie's mutism is met with teasing and ridicule from almost every character in the book. But no one ever says a bad word about the character with cancer. I'm amazed that Rozzie was never annoyed by that double standard because I definitely was.
Regardless, this was a lovely middle-grade novel that I'm very glad to have randomly borrowed from the library.  
Warnings: ableism, anxiety, bullying, childhood cancer, character death      
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Shelf-Confidence Book Photo Challenge
January 22 2022 – World Building
I absolutely adore the world building in the Lightbringer series. I read The Black Prism back in 2010 on a recommendation and fell in love with the world – from the characters and storyline, to the magic system and history of its world. Hopefully this year I’ll get around to re-reading from the beginning before I finally get around to reading the last book in the series, The Burning White.
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Shelf-Confidence BPC January 2022 | 20. Fantastical settings
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Shelfconfidence BPC | January | Day 22: world building
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trcc’s wednesday edits - Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson
“Hear me and heed me. This murdered girl will no longer lie. Set her feet to walking. Send her back to me.”
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