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theworldbrewery · 13 days ago
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Whale Shark Gliding Through Bioluminiscent Algae _ Mike Nulty
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theworldbrewery · 15 days ago
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Encounter: all-girl gnome biker gang
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theworldbrewery · 18 days ago
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Yep!
But in practice it works out a little differently, usually you’re not just moving 30ft on your turn and that’s it. within those 6 seconds you’re also often making 1-3 attacks (or as many as 6 if you’re a fighter), casting 1-2 spells, or using a couple different abilities. In practice, that means that the total time you have to run is less. you basically spend 3 seconds moving your 30 ft and the remaining 3 seconds doing everything else.
That’s why the Dash action doubles your movement; it’s you choosing to run further to the exclusion of doing something else, and why characters trained in sprints (like monks and rogues) can Dash as a bonus action.
I was doing some calculations for my dnd spell list and apparently 30 feet per turn works out roughly to 3.4 miles per hour.
3.4 miles per hour is a brisk walk for me and I'm 5'5". My legs are not all that long. This means that if you move 30 feet on your turn in combat you're just, powerwalking toward your adversary it's probably not even a jog
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theworldbrewery · a month ago
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finished ma contaminated fairy :)
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theworldbrewery · a month ago
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the english major in me is still fucked up over deciding that in my campaign, Mystra is a Macbeth figure, Kelemvor is a Hamlet figure, and Cyric is a Brutus (Julius Caesar) figure. Cyric stabbing his dearest friend to death in the last moment ‘because I loved Rome more,’ Mystra seeing the meaninglessness of life and craving immortality and committing unholy murder to achieve glory and godhood, Kelemvor well-meaning and devoted and losing everything through inaction;
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theworldbrewery · 2 months ago
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theworldbrewery · 2 months ago
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Works of Mercy vs. Works of War, Catholic Worker Movement
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theworldbrewery · 3 months ago
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My players, when the story of my game takes an unexpected turn:
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theworldbrewery · 4 months ago
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over our last two sessions, I ran something a little different. Our cleric, Oggie, has a (complicated) relationship with this NPC, Elliot. Elliot is a gay half-elf man whose father is a politician and diplomat; Elliot’s father has decided that since Elliot has a criminal record (he was framed for treason) the best way to ensure he is provided for is to marry him off to another political family, neatly tucking him away where he can’t cause a scandal.
Now, his father isn’t too interested in Elliot’s desire for romance or attraction, so he’s arranged a marriage with a young woman from a prominent elven family. The party quickly decided that this cannot stand. They agreed to attend the wedding in order to prevent it from happening.
Upon arrival at the venue, however, a few key things were going to pop off. First, it turns out Oggie’s estranged family lives in the town. Second, the whole region is deeply haunted and extremely sinister. Third, messing up the bride’s life was a non-option, because when I introduced the character of the bride, a friend of ours came out of the bedroom where I’d stashed them and introduced themself as Gloria, the bride herself (an air genasi monk in a family of elves, another outsider).
this was already clearly a rousing success, but we still had to get through the wedding, and I had to run it in a way that felt dynamic and tense. People go from room to room and building to building, indoors and outdoors and making visits to the village. It’s the day of a wedding!
So I developed a method for running the Day of the Wedding, and I’m sharing it with you for any extended roleplay and intrigue encounters you want to tangle up in plot threads.
First things first: run it like a combat.
What I mean by that is when the party woke up on the day of the wedding, I asked them all to roll for initiative. Instead of a round taking six seconds, each round lasted one hour, enough time for a movement (go to 2 areas near one another or 1 place that’s a bit further away), an action (a primary roleplay scene or investigation), and a bonus action (a conversation with a fellow player character, a quick search of an area, etc.). As the DM, use your discretion to decide what constitutes a suitable bonus action vs action.
Now, unlike combat, this type of encounter should permit player characters to team up and act together. When a PC that is high in initiative order decides to do something, other PCs that rolled lower can opt to join them if they want to act in the same location or engage with the same NPCs. (This is a great option to keep the action moving and lets players work together more.)
In order to keep this situation rolling, I prepared a few key notes. I focused on regional effects; that is, the overall culture and vibe of the area. I decided early on that the region is haunted, and that the locals are suspicious, superstitious, and obsessed with cleanliness. These features are tied into the overall plot conflicts that would develop over time. I also chose to include the effects of the Haunted table from Tasha’s Cauldron to add some spiciness to my haunting. In essence, think of the tensions the NPCs in the region are already experiencing prior to the party getting involved. A recent assassination might make a court intrigue more complicated as they now distrust strangers, for instance, while a new trade war over tariffs can complicate a diplomatic mission.
Next, I considered my locations. In this instance, my locations included the inn where the party slept, various rooms in the manor house hosting the wedding, a handful of outdoor areas, and the chapel. I focused on creating detailed descriptions of the ambiance for each location.
Then, I wrote out a quick description of each major NPC - in this case, the wedding party, the family of the intended, and a few locals and guests. In a roleplay/intrigue scenario like this, it’s vital to include motivations, secrets, and goals for each of these NPCs, even if those goals are very simple. You’ll need them for the last step:
Create a round-by-round timeline. Write out your list of locations and pair them with the NPCs that will be there during each round (hour). In my notes, I added what the NPC was doing there or what they were thinking about--linking their motivation to their location. For example, a character in the garden was leaving an early-morning meeting with her lover, the new gardener, while the fathers of the bride and groom met in the library to discuss the cover-up they had just pulled off (a politician and wedding guest had died mysteriously at midnight, and to keep the wedding from being derailed, they had hidden the body and were intimidating the only witness).
Party members who arrived at each location were therefore entering existing scenes they didn’t have full context for. Each hour, the NPCs would move on to the next phase of their day, seek out other NPCs to interact with, etc. NPCs could still be influenced by the party’s actions, so each round you might adjust exactly what they’re doing or where they’ve gone--the beauty of improv!
Keep in mind that situations should still be developing when the party isn’t witnessing them. An NPC no one had spoken to yet turned out to have spent the morning searching for her missing father, which led the party to the gravesite that they’d spotted earlier in the game, while the gardener turned out to be a villain they’d met before who was acting in secret during the session! Use your best judgment, though. Just because you wrote content for an NPC doesn’t mean the party will engage with it, so follow their lead; sprinkle the clues, and then let the party’s focus drive which storylines get developed.
So long as every NPC has a goal or secret to influence their opinions and decisions, they will feel like nuanced actors within the roleplay scenario; the timeline you lay out in advance gives them a sort of “Artificial Intelligence” that can be influenced by the player’s actions.
Personally, I also recommend setting a natural deadline for the party. If my players didn’t stop the wedding by 1pm, for instance, the ceremony would go forward and they would either be forced to object in public or let the marriage take place. Thus, they only had 5 total “rounds” to disrupt things enough that the wedding would be called off.
You can create similar deadlines depending on the central goal of the party. A vote on whether to pass a controversial law could serve as one for a court intrigue arc, while a crime-solving arc might have a threatened time when a kidnapping victim will be murdered (”You have 24 hours to deliver the ransom”, for example). The sense of a ticking time-bomb gives the players a much-needed urgency. The round-by-round timeline also helps to ensure that you won’t have to continue prepping rounds ad infinitum; instead, you need only prepare up until shit pops off and the deadline is reached.
You may find you won’t reach the deadline, though. In this arc, the party discovered the corpse of a major politician who had died in the night and was secretly buried by the gardener. They used the cover-up as leverage to blackmail the parents of the bride and groom into calling off the marriage, which was helped along by the ranger revealing that Elliot’s father was concealing Elliot’s criminal record to keep the marriage arrangement intact. They managed to prevent the wedding with an hour to spare.
However, as Alice the sorcerer went downstairs to announce the cancellation, she spotted a person who looked just like her weaving through the crowd to leave the manor. She followed, and discovered that she was tracking the semi-villainous NPC who had crossed paths with the party a few times before, disguised as Alice. The NPC, Florian, had been playing the role of the gardener, and blackmailed the bride’s father into giving up a precious family heirloom in exchange for concealing the body; now that the cover-up has been revealed, they’re getting out of Dodge with their prize. This revelation serves as the plot hook for the next dungeon!
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theworldbrewery · 4 months ago
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divine passion, oc. 2021
kisses and tenderness, my beloved
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theworldbrewery · 4 months ago
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I just read your cleric multiclass post and loved it. Wonder what your thought on multiclassing with the twilight domain.
Sure!
The twilight domain cleric has a really beautiful flavor; it leans hard into the notions of being seen and unseen, the moonlight that reveals and the darkness that conceals. With that in mind, the twilight cleric has a few features that should inform your decision.
As a twilight domain cleric, you have proficiency in martial weapons and heavy armor. Your channel divinity similarly suggests being in or near melee range. Now, I'd normally advise a paladin multiclass for a character with these features, but here, I think you'll benefit more from taking a level or two in fighter. If you lean into the specialties of the twilight cleric, the ideal strategy is to take 2 levels in fighter. Take whatever fighting style suits you. Second Wind will help you avoid going down while you're in the thick of it, and that Action Surge you get at your second fighter level is not limited to attacks. You can use that action surge for healing, for utility spells, or anything else you feel inspired by.
If being a fighter doesn't inspire you (or you prefer to stay out of melee for the most part), consider dipping into rogue instead. Your twilight domain features credit you with several opportunities to vanish, give yourself advantage on initiative rolls, and put your enemies to sleep--all of which open you up to the perks of being a rogue (i.e., Sneak Attack.) In my opinion, it's worth taking as many as three levels in rogue for this class, since you'll enjoy the perks of Cunning Actions to mesh with your cleric class features, and taking the Assassin archetype will really capitalize on it--you can grant yourself advantage on initiative, so when you attack early in combat, you have the assassin's advantage--and the sneak attack that goes with it. Keep in mind, though, that sneaking may get harder when you use your divine domain feature.
Last but not least, the paladin is still a good option for you. There's more overlap than I would usually advise, but extra healing (Lay on Hands) never hurt anyone, you can cast higher-level divine smites using your existing cleric slots, and getting additional paladin spell slots will prevent you from falling behind in the spell slot economy.
Happy multiclassing!
If you enjoyed this post, check out the masterpost here.
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theworldbrewery · 4 months ago
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Sorry for being insane power-hungry, shallow, vain, jealous, posessive, mean, horrific, bloodthirsty, kafkaesque, demanding, pushy and all together a little bit off-putting do you still think im hot?
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theworldbrewery · 5 months ago
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I think it's time for a refresher about what a "trickster" is and what makes a character or deity one.
A trickster is a boundary-crosser; an entity who highlights the rules and conventions of society by calling them into question, usually with their actions, and usually by breaking said rules and conventions. This helps us assess why these rules are in place and if they even serve us.
Because of this, tricksters tend to be transgressive and subversive. Sometimes this can be very delightful and other times can be very uncomfortable, even repulsive.
"Trickster" is a function, not a personality type. Sure, many tricksters are cocky and possess a devil-may-care attitude, but so do other beings who aren't tricksters, and there are many tricksters out there that don't have these personality traits.
Tricksters don't exclusively deal with absolutes. Everything they do changes depending on the situation they're dealing with and the goal they're trying to achieve. And unfortunately, this is what many people seem to misunderstand.
For example, I often see people say, "Tricksters are never trustworthy," or, "Tricksters always have ulterior motivations," when the truth is that tricksters are situationally trustworthy, and tricksters situationally have ulterior motivations.
Tricksters are capable of being selfish or selfless, helpful or harmful, constructive or destructive, kind or cruel, etc. all depending on what it is they're trying to achieve. We may not always know what they'll choose because they're operating at a higher level of meta than we are.
This is the nature you're dealing with when dealing with a trickster. They're not "secretly a villain" or actually an "unconventional and misunderstood hero." They're a trickster, and that moral gray is what you're going to get when dealing with them.
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theworldbrewery · 5 months ago
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theworldbrewery · 5 months ago
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So unless I am mistaken today’s skyjacks confirms Margaret is a trans woman?
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theworldbrewery · 5 months ago
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I like this, but OP, there *is* a ranger option that suits being a wanderer/navigator a bit better--the Horizon Walker ranger subclass focuses especially on crossing between worlds--something Moana does at least once--and have a special kinship with otherworldly beings.
Making a 3rd Disney Princess DnD Party
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KIDAGAKASH LIFE DOMAIN CLERIC
I’m sure some will argue that she should be a Fighter of some kind, as Kidagakash is clearly an Atlantean warrior when we meet her, but the crystals all Atlanteans wear have healing energy, and the Heart of Atlantis is a very powerful and sacred relic that Kida herself is connected to. This is why I chose Cleric, as it lets her be a healer, using the life-giving energy of the crystal. If that doesn’t tickle your pickle, there are other options, like making her a Champion Fighter or an Ancestral Guardian Barbarian.
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MOANA HUNTER RANGER
I never realized until now that there’s no Ranger subclass for just being an explorer, navigator, or wanderer. Most are protectors against the wilderness. I made Moana a Ranger because finding your way and journeying to uncharted places is a balanced part of a ranger’s breakfast. Survival checks help people to navigate, and no class is more devoted to this skill than the ranger. So, it’s the best way to make Moana a wave finder. As such, I opted for Hunter because she has some fighting skills, and none of the other options were a better fit.
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TIANA GLORY PALADIN
This is probably the farthest stretch I’ve ever had to make for one of these characters, but Tiana is really hard to translate to DnD. The only three things we really learn about Tiana in the movie is that she can cook, she believes in hard work, and she wants to own her own business. While those are fine traits, a lack of abilities or anything we can assign to Tiana basically means we have to shoot for the closest target. Tiana values hard work and puts no stock in destiny or wishes. Well, the Paladin believes in holding themselves to codes and conducts, and the Glory Paladin specifically seeks fame, recognition, awards, or other forms of success. I know it’s meant in more of a grand scheme of life thing, but she’s not driven by a desire to uphold the law, serve her country, or protect those who can’t protect themselves. I don’t know what else to tell you, the Oath of Glory puts a lot of emphasis on the Paladin’s personal ambitions. It’s a loose and weak connection, but it’s about all we got. Otherwise, you’re just stretching to make a Druid because someone else Polymorphed her into a frog.
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EILONWY OF THE HOUSE OF LYR ARCHFEY WARLOCK / SEA SORCERER (Optional)
I had to cheat a little by looking at the Eilonwy from the books, and the books describe Eilonwy as being the daughter of a long line of enchantresses, but that her magical studies were interrupted when she was very young and inexperienced, leading to her being very unskilled in her magic. More importantly, her Bauble can only be summoned by her, and the Warlock not only has a very small pool of spell slots, but the Chain Pact Warlock gets unique familiars that nobody else can summon. This way, even mechanically, nobody can summon her Bauble except for herself. I went with Pact of the Archfey mostly… because there’s very little else to go on, but her Bauble seems like a Pixie to me. As she does come from a long line of magic-users, it’s not out of the question to multiclass into Sorcerer at higher levels once she’s had more training. Specifically, she is related to Lyr, the Welsh god of the Sea, so the Sea Sorcerer is an excellent subclass to Multiclass into.
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RAYA KENSEI MONK
With a fine mixture of hand-to-hand and weapon training, as well as the Eastern influences of the film, Raya feels right at home as a weapon-skilled monk. You could absolutely multiclass her into a Fighter for more weapon proficiency, but she fights in relatively little armor, and her martial arts skills are better than Mulan’s which is why I lean more Monk than Fighter for her.
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theworldbrewery · 5 months ago
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A d20 sidecar, a d6 margarita, a d10 Old Fashioned, a d12 chocolate martini, a d8 Sex on the Beach, a d6 ale, a d8 lavender mojito, a d4 strawberry milkshake, and a d20 Bay Breeze (my personal fave)
Some of these (looking at you, Sex on the Beach) were requests from my friends, coupled with their favorite dice! Others just felt like fun color and die combos.
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