todaysbat
todaysbat
today's bat
bats are the cutest animals. inspired by todaysbird and my passion for bats. icon by firlalaith
todaysbat · 2 hours ago
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A Mauritian Tomb Bat
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todaysbat · 19 hours ago
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Bat Week starts tomorrow!
More information, including links to events and recipes etc can be found on the Bat Week official website at https://batweek.org/
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todaysbat · 19 hours ago
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Hello! New follower here! Do you have any favorite books/documentaries about bats that you would recommend to someone who wants to learn, but doesn't know where to start? (That's me!)
Oh yes, definitely.
I actually haven't watched a lot of bat documentaries, but the PBS science show NOVA recently did an episode on bats that I recommend called Bat Superpowers (season 48 episode 10). https://www.pbs.org/video/bat-superpowers-nfuph6/
As for books, I recommend looking for books that focus on your part of the world to start with, to familiarize yourself with bats in your area. Keep in mind publication dates, as information about ranges of different species changes over time as well as just basic information. I'd start at your local public library to find a title.
As for specific titles...here you go, with links to buy them from a site that supports bat conservation with every purchase.
If you live in the United States and Canada, I recommend Bats of the United States and Canada by Harvey, Altenbach and Best. Good pictures. You can find it on Batgoods.com https://www.batgoods.com/item/Bats-of-the-United-States-and-Canada-634
Another favorite book of mine is The Secret Lives of Bats by Merlin Tuttle. This is his autobiography. Highly recommend, details his research and conservation efforts as well as the journey he took to take pictures of bats. And there's some of his pictures too. You can buy it on Batgoods.com: https://www.batgoods.com/item/The-Secret-Lives-of-Bats--1160
Speaking of Merlin Tuttle's bat photography, another favorite book of mine, Bats: An Illustrated Guide to All Species features his photos and covers nearly every species known. You can find it on Batgoods.com: https://www.batgoods.com/item/Bats-An-Illustrated-Guide-to-All-Species-Photographed-by-Merlin-Tuttle-2117
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todaysbat · 22 hours ago
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Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus)
Fun fact: Despite their common names, little brown bats are not close relatives of big brown bats
Image source: Merlin Tuttle
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todaysbat · 22 hours ago
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Pallid Bat
Fun fact: these guys smell like skunks.
image source: Ann Froschauer/USFWS
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todaysbat · 22 hours ago
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three things you should know about hoary bats and wind energy
Without intervention to reduce fatalities, Hoary Bats could decline by a staggering 50% by the year 2028. Hoary Bats are particularly vulnerable to colliding with the rotating blades of wind turbines.
Wind energy developments are expected to nearly double by 2030. The U.S. Department of Energy predicts that wind energy will nearly double by 2030. By working collaboratively with industry partners, we can have sustainable wind energy while protecting biodiversity.
There are solutions. Bat Conservation International and the wind industry have been working together to successfully test and prove methods of reducing bat fatalities.  One of the most promising and proven solutions slows down or stops the rotation of turbine blades during narrow windows of time, such as at night during fall migration and under low wind conditions when energy production is lessened.
source: https://www.batcon.org/three-things-you-should-know-about-hoary-bats-and-wind-energy/
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todaysbat · a day ago
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hey can we get this post as viral as the tiktok video about bats doing calculus? I know this post isn't as fun and exciting, but I think it's really really important people are aware about this issue, especially if you live in North America.
white nose syndrome
Today I'm going to talk a lot about a major threat to bats in North America--white nose syndrome. I will talk about what you can do to help in a separate post as this got quite long. Just check out this site for some ideas: https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/static-page/how-you-can-help
warning: animal death
What is White Nose Syndrome? White Nose Syndrome (abbreviated WNS) is a disease in hibernating bats caused by infection with a fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans (often abbreviated to Pd). The name comes from how the fungus often grows on infected bats' faces as white fuzz, making their noses appear to be white. The fungus grows on bats as they hibernate, causing the bats to burn up the reserves they built up to last thru the winter faster than normal. Bats with WNS have been observed doing strange things like flying in the daytime during the winter. Bats can get infected by bats who are already infected or from the environment.
How deadly is WNS for bats? Millions of bats have died from WNS. At some sites, the fatality rate ranged from 90 to 100 percent, with the hardest hit species being the northern long-eared bat, little brown bat, and tricolored bat (over 90 percent of each species). Some species, like the Virginia big-eared bat, have been found infected with Pd but not sick with WNS.
Is there a cure? Not yet. But scientists around the world are working to find one. Or even a treatment. Research over the decades since 2007 have turned up some possibilities ranging from a vaccine to making changes to bat habitats.
Can humans get WNS? No. There are other fungal diseases associated with bats that humans can get, but this is not one of them.
Where did it come from? Scientists first saw bats sick and dying from WNS in caves near Albany, New York in 2007. However, thanks to photos taken by cavers in the area the year before that show bats with what looks like white powder on their noses, it is believed that the fungus was present in the area even earlier than that. Pd was completely new to science when it was found growing on bats, and a global search was started to look for it elsewhere. It was found on bats in Europe and Asia, but those bats weren't getting as sick as the bats in North America were--an indication that the fungus likely evolved there and was only recently brought to North America. Exactly how the fungus made the jump to North America is unknown, but the most likely scenario is that Pd spores found their way onto the clothes or gear of a caver in a cave in Europe or Asia and then were deposited in the caves where WNS was seen first.
Sources:
White-Nose Syndrome Response Team, US Fish and Wildlife Service - https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/
Bat Conservation International - https://www.batcon.org/our-work/research-and-scalable-solutions/white-nose-syndrome/
BCI Press Release on Research on WNS impact on bat species that found that WNS had killed over 90 percent of three species of bat, April 20, 2021 - https://www.batcon.org/press/white-nose-syndrome-killed-over-90-of-three-north-american-bat-species/
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todaysbat · a day ago
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white nose syndrome
Today I'm going to talk a lot about a major threat to bats in North America--white nose syndrome. I will talk about what you can do to help in a separate post as this got quite long. Just check out this site for some ideas: https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/static-page/how-you-can-help
warning: animal death
What is White Nose Syndrome? White Nose Syndrome (abbreviated WNS) is a disease in hibernating bats caused by infection with a fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans (often abbreviated to Pd). The name comes from how the fungus often grows on infected bats' faces as white fuzz, making their noses appear to be white. The fungus grows on bats as they hibernate, causing the bats to burn up the reserves they built up to last thru the winter faster than normal. Bats with WNS have been observed doing strange things like flying in the daytime during the winter. Bats can get infected by bats who are already infected or from the environment.
How deadly is WNS for bats? Millions of bats have died from WNS. At some sites, the fatality rate ranged from 90 to 100 percent, with the hardest hit species being the northern long-eared bat, little brown bat, and tricolored bat (over 90 percent of each species). Some species, like the Virginia big-eared bat, have been found infected with Pd but not sick with WNS.
Is there a cure? Not yet. But scientists around the world are working to find one. Or even a treatment. Research over the decades since 2007 have turned up some possibilities ranging from a vaccine to making changes to bat habitats.
Can humans get WNS? No. There are other fungal diseases associated with bats that humans can get, but this is not one of them.
Where did it come from? Scientists first saw bats sick and dying from WNS in caves near Albany, New York in 2007. However, thanks to photos taken by cavers in the area the year before that show bats with what looks like white powder on their noses, it is believed that the fungus was present in the area even earlier than that. Pd was completely new to science when it was found growing on bats, and a global search was started to look for it elsewhere. It was found on bats in Europe and Asia, but those bats weren't getting as sick as the bats in North America were--an indication that the fungus likely evolved there and was only recently brought to North America. Exactly how the fungus made the jump to North America is unknown, but the most likely scenario is that Pd spores found their way onto the clothes or gear of a caver in a cave in Europe or Asia and then were deposited in the caves where WNS was seen first.
Sources:
White-Nose Syndrome Response Team, US Fish and Wildlife Service - https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/
Bat Conservation International - https://www.batcon.org/our-work/research-and-scalable-solutions/white-nose-syndrome/
BCI Press Release on Research on WNS impact on bat species that found that WNS had killed over 90 percent of three species of bat, April 20, 2021 - https://www.batcon.org/press/white-nose-syndrome-killed-over-90-of-three-north-american-bat-species/
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todaysbat · a day ago
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Myotis nimbaensis by Fiona Reid
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todaysbat · a day ago
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Nimba Myotis (Myotis nimbaensis)
In the Nimba mountains of Guinea, there lives a species of orange bat only recently discovered by scientists.
This myotis was discovered by researchers in 2018 while looking for a different species of bat, the critically endangered Lamotte's roundleaf bat (Hipposideros lamottei) that only lives in the Nimba Mountains.
Source: https://www.batcon.org/meet-myotis-nimbaensis/
Image: Dr. Jon Flanders, via BCI
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todaysbat · a day ago
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If anyone has bat questions or requests, feel free to send them at any time.
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todaysbat · a day ago
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Whether chatting with friends at a dinner party or managing a high-stakes meeting at work, communicating with others in a group requires a complex set of mental tasks. Our brains must track who is speaking and what is being said, as well as what our relationship to that person may be -- because, after all, we probably give the opinion of our best friend more weight than that of a complete stranger.
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todaysbat · 2 days ago
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Common pipistrelle
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todaysbat · 3 days ago
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I apologize if this has been asked before, but do you have a favorite type of bat? And do you have an interesting fact that you love about said bat? 🦇 🖤
my favorite bat is the hammer headed bat!
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only male bats have that giant weird face, and they use it to honk really loud at the females!
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fun fact, male hammer headed bats are SO all about the honk that they've also rearranged their chest organs to make way for a REALLY BIG larynx, so they literally just shoved their heart aside with an "excuse me please, gotta honk real loud"
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todaysbat · 4 days ago
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h e c k
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todaysbat · 5 days ago
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Rodrigues flying fox (Pteropus rodricensis)
Image source: San Diego Zoo
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todaysbat · 5 days ago
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things are heating up in the bird fandom
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