Tumgir
thoughtportal · a day ago
Link
The six-week abortion ban currently in effect in Texas has a crafty enforcement mechanism: It notoriously allows private citizens to sue abortion providers or people who help a pregnant person get an abortion after six weeks’ gestation, but it does not let them sue the person seeking an abortion. A bill proposed in New Hampshire, now, would let someone sue a pregnant person to try to block their abortion at any stage of pregnancy—even if he merely claims to be the father. It’s a horrific bill that would not only violates people’s bodily autonomy, but could also enable domestic abusers and lead to the criminalization of pregnancy loss.
6 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Link
South Korea never had a full pandemic lockdown—which is not to say that workers and small businesses haven’t suffered. But the big picture is that Koreans have traded some freedoms for others. Eighty-four per cent of the population is fully vaccinated, as compared with sixty-three per cent in the U.S. In exchange for wearing masks and being tracked at all times, people go to school and work and, statistically, enjoy a far higher chance of survival. Controlling for the difference in population, twenty-one times more people in the U.S. have died from COVID than in South Korea; fourteen times more people have contracted the virus. I am sure that many Americans, since March of 2020, have wished for certain kinds of unfreedom.
Early in the pandemic, commentators in the U.S. and Europe struggled to explain the high levels of mask compliance, and low levels of death, in South Korea and other East and Southeast Asian nations. They invoked stereotypes, such as a general propensity to heed authority and “high levels of social cohesion,” ignoring the continent’s rowdy, revolutionary histories. The difference seems, to me, less cultural than structural: habitual mask wearing, owing in part to the SARS outbreak of the early two-thousands; centralized governance (being a small country helps); and a strong public-health system. When I interviewed the Taiwanese cabinet member Audrey Tang about her government’s response, she relayed an early lesson in public education. “Wear a mask to protect others” didn’t work. “Wear a mask to protect yourself” did.
Like every other country, South Korea has its share of COVID skeptics and people who oppose masking and vaccine mandates. A few weeks ago, a group of cram-school owners won a lawsuit exempting their students from having to be vaccinated—an infringement, they said, on the constitutional right to learn. And many older Koreans, remembering the curfews and surveillance of the country’s authoritarian past, are wary of strict government directives. Yet it’s rare to see anyone unmasked, even on an empty sidewalk; not once have I spotted a bare nose or chin on public transit.
2 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Link
1 note · View note
thoughtportal · a day ago
Link
Months of research and dozens of interviews by AL.com found that Brookside’s finances are rocket-fueled by tickets and aggressive policing. In a two-year period between 2018 and 2020 Brookside revenues from fines and forfeitures soared more than 640 percent and now make up half the city’s total income.
And the police chief has called for more.
The town of 1,253 just north of Birmingham reported just 55 serious crimes to the state in the entire eight year period between 2011 and 2018 – none of them homicide or rape. But in 2018 it began building a police empire, hiring more and more officers to blanket its six miles of roads and mile-and-a-half jurisdiction on Interstate 22.
By 2020 Brookside made more misdemeanor arrests than it has residents. It went from towing 50 vehicles in 2018 to 789 in 2020 – each carrying fines. That’s a 1,478% increase, with 1.7 tows for every household in town.
Police stops soared between 2018 and 2020. Fines and forfeitures – seizures of cars during traffic stops, among other things – doubled from 2018 to 2019. In 2020 they came to $610,000. That’s 49% of the small town’s skyrocketing revenue.
A department of nine officers in a 1,253-person town is far larger than average. Across the country, the average size of a force is one officer for every 588 residents, according to a Governing Magazine study that examined federal statistics.
Last year, based on Jones’ testimony, Brookside had at least one officer for every 144 residents.
In 2018, when the town had one full-time police officer and a few part-timers, it reported no serious crimes to the Alabama Criminal Justice Information Center. Brookside Police did patrol the 1.5-mile stretch of Interstate 22 within their jurisdiction and wrote tickets that brought in $82,467 in fines. That contributed a 14% chunk of the city’s total income, a number that would be considered high in much of America.
Arrests on Brookside warrants went from zero to 243 in the span of two years, according to statistics Chief Jones presented to the council.
Jones — again as Mayor Bryan nodded — said the goal of the department is only to help people.
“It’s not about making a dollar,” Jones said.
Yet the town with no traffic lights collected $487 in fines and forfeitures in 2020 for every man, woman and child, though many of those fined were merely passing by on I-22.
Total town income more than doubled from 2018 to 2020 – from $582,000 to more than $1.2 million – as fines and forfeitures rose 640%.
2 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Link
The corporate return on this mountain of money has been significant. Over the last 40 years, corporate tax rates have plunged. Regulatory protections for consumers, workers and the environment have been defanged. Antitrust has become so ineffectual that many big corporations face little or no competition.
Corporations have fought off safety nets and public investments that are common in other advanced nations (most recently, Build Back Better). They’ve attacked labor laws, reducing the portion of private-sector workers belonging to a union from a third 40 years ago to just over 6% now.
They’ve collected hundreds of billions in federal subsidies, bailouts, loan guarantees and sole-source contracts. Corporate welfare for big pharma, big oil, big tech, big ag, the largest military contractors and biggest banks now dwarfs the amount of welfare for people.
The profits of big corporations just reached a 70-year high, even during a pandemic. The ratio of CEO pay in large companies to average workers has ballooned from 20-to-1 in the 1960s, to 320-to-1 now.
Meanwhile, most Americans are going nowhere. The typical worker’s wage is only a bit higher today than it was 40 years ago, when adjusted for inflation.
But the biggest casualty is public trust in democracy.
0 notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Video
0 notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Photo
Tumblr media
8 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · a day ago
Photo
Tumblr media
15 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 2 days ago
Link
“There is a famine of beauty.” And look at us now, trying to make something worthy from memory’s hem. Look at us now, draped in knowing just how good, how rich, how BLACK we had it with him. Onward. There’s got to be more out here somewhere.
0 notes
thoughtportal · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
banshee in the woods
follow my instagram :)
7K notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
6 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 2 days ago
Video
25 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 2 days ago
Video
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nell_Brinkley
9 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 3 days ago
Text
You're an immortal vampire who can only be killed by a wooden stake through the heart. In a dying universe, you're now in a spaceship, looking for wood before it's too late.
331 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 3 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
So I’m at a library in a town I don’t live in to spend time with my nieces and I go to the bathroom and see this sign.
Tumblr media
They turned their old card catalog into free supplies people can discretely take on their own.
Tumblr media Tumblr media
This is the coolest thing ever, a great way to help people without making them ask, and an amazing reuse of a the card catalog. I’m seriously about to cry I love it so much.
46K notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 3 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Agostino Ramelli’s “Book Wheel” from 1588 rotates books in front of a reader to bring a relevant title by turning around. The machine is using epicyclic gearing system to ensure the shelves would stay at the same angle https://bit.ly/32aUbtS
86 notes · View notes
thoughtportal · 3 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
goots
2K notes · View notes