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narnianarcher·4 hours agoText

teabooksandsweets:

As I have explained before, I really, really, really, really recommend watching

All Creatures Great and Small

(the series, not the movies – and I also very much!!! recommend reading the original books, which are brilliant!) and thus I present you here and now the first five out of, uh, ninety episodes. (Tumblr won’t have ninety videos in one post.)

Horse Sense – In which the new boy in Darrowby gets a job (and risks losing it)

Dog Days – In which we meet Tristan, and Tricki-Woo (who? woo!)

It Takes All Kinds – In which James falls in love

Calf Love – In which we learn that siblings best annoy each other with pigs

Out of Practice – In which there is an awkward first date

Have fun!

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narnianarcher·a day agoLink
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narnianarcher·2 days agoText

bodleianlibs:

CS Lewis was born on this day in 1898. A poet, academic, critic and theologian, Lewis is best known for his novels, particularly the timelessly popular Chronicles of Narnia.

This delightful map of Narnia and its surrounding lands was drawn by Lewis himself and now resides in the Bodleian archives, preserving a privileged insight into Lewis’ world-making processes.

image

Lewis did not intend for his own illustration to be published in his books, intending instead that a professional artist would create a more polished interpretation. Pauline Baynes was introduced to Lewis by his fellow Inkling JRR Tolkien, and she redrafted the map for publication in Prince Caspian, the second book of the series.

In a letter with further instructions for Baynes, dated 8 January 1951, Lewis described the finished look he was hoping for.

My idea was that the map should be more like a medieval map than an Ordnance Survey – mountains and castles drawn – perhaps winds blowing at the corners – and a few heraldic-looking ships, whales and dolphins in the sea.

For those who do not know Narnia quite so well, here are some of the more interesting places on the map.

Aslan’s How: The mound covering what was once the Stone Table where Aslan was sacrificed.

Beruna: One of the four named towns in Narnia. Strategically built at the confluence of rivers, Beruna became the site of two great battles.

Cair Paravel: The capital of the Kingdom of Narnia, and the location of the Royal Castle where High King Peter, Queen Susan, Queen Lucy and King Edmund havetheir thrones.

Dancing Lawn: The ritual site for old Narnians, and the meeting place after Prince Caspian flees from Miraz’s castle.

Lantern Waste: The location of The Lantern of Ever Lighted Lamp, the lamppost where Lucy and Mr Tumnus first meet after she passes through the wardrobe. Lantern Waste is also where Digory, Polly, Jadis and their companions witnessed the creation of Narnia.

Miraz’s Castle: Where Prince Caspian is raised by Miraz, his uncle and un-rightful ruler of Narnia. 

Trufflehunter’s Cave: The home of Trufflehunter the badger, first talking animal that Prince Caspian meets and later a Knight in the Order of the Lion.

image
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narnianarcher·3 days agoText

just-mythyk:

dovewithscales:

alandofdawnandstarlight:

made-of-love-and-stars:

autumnj0y:

I’m both pro herbal medicine and pro vaccination because you can treat burns with aloe vera juice and sore throats with lavender infused honey but you can’t rid a country of polio with plants. 

THIS.

Don’t forget kids, jewelweed is a natural counteragent to poison ivy rashes but it won’t do shit against whooping cough

Mint for nausea, valerian and chamomile for sleep, antibiotics for fucking infections.

educational and salty. i like it.

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narnianarcher·3 days agoText

ilsa-fireswan:

angualupin:

angualupin:

I feel like I need to tell everyone how brilliantly the Globe incorporated a deaf Gildenstern into the 2018 Hamlet and then force all of you to watch it

ok, so Gildenstern is played by a deaf actor, Nadia Nadarajah. he* signs all his lines, and either Rosencratz interprets for him, or the person he’s talking to says something that makes it obvious what he just said, depending. how each character reacts to Gildenstern is completely in-character and often hilarious

  • Claudius and Gertrude are intensely awkward around Gildenstern. they obviously don’t know BSL so they just gesture emphatically but aimlessly when they talk.
  • Hamlet, who of course is friends with R&G, *does* know BSL. he starts off by signing fluently whenever he’s talking to them but, as his distrust of them grows, he signs less and less until he’s only signing the equivalent of “fuck off” whenever he talks
  • Polonius just shouts really loud whenever he tries to talk to Gildenstern

it’s all brilliant and adds another layer of humor and pathos and you should all watch it

*casting at the Globe right now is gender neutral so I’m just going to use the character’s pronouns

guys I know I’m wittering on about this but the thing I want to emphasize is that there is no tokenism here. they didn’t just shove a deaf actor into a speaking role so they could pat themselves on the back about how progressive they are. they went to the effort of fully integrating Nadarajah’s deafness into the story so that it not only fit organically within the narrative but actually enhanced it. watching Hamlet’s signing disintegrate as his trust in R&G disintegrates adds a depth to that storyline I’ve never seen before. Claudius has exactly the awkwardness of someone who thinks of himself as a good person and therefore thinks he’s being kind and generous with his accommodations for disability, but has never even once actually asked a disabled person what they need, which is so on-point for his character it hurts.

I know Michelle Terry gets a lot of hate mail for her policy of race-, gender-, and disability-blind casting, but fuck all those people. long may that policy continue.

Thanks to this post @narnianarcher and I watched this recently. There was a lot to like: Hamlet’s emotional journey, Claudius’ lightly skeevy charisma and how much character work his hands do, the different insights that are brought to the characters by the gender neutral casting, the costuming choices, and, of course, Deaf Guildenstern.

I was fascinated watching the intersection of necessary staging/blocking with how a deaf person would need to interact with a scene to actually live in it. There were times when R&G are motionless in the background so as not to distract from the main action, but when there are beats between moments you see R telling G what is going on. Mostly it’s a minimalist 1-4 sign summary of the last (or most important) thought, but it’s there.

I truly believed that Hamlet speaks BSL and that Gertrude picked up a couple of signs over time. Claudius has a real “wow this is awkward but I need the good publicity” vibe every time they interact. Plus he talks with his hands a lot so it’s fun when he realizes he’s doing it and tries to turn it into some kind of (awkward and not actually correct) sign.

I assume (from this as my only exposure) that BSL is more linguistically compact than ASL, but it also looked a lot like they were dumbing down the BSL for the hearing audience. Even with that I was disappointed in Rosencrantz since I never truly believed he speaks BSL and I expected him to be the most fluent. It might be that I’m making unfair comparisons with how ASL functions, but he felt like he memorized some signs for the show and didn’t truly understand how the language works. Hamlet, however, had the facial movement and spacial hand placement that indicates at least some knowledge of signed language. It was fascinating to watch Hamlet’s mental state change through sign: from full monologue-with-BSL to a stilted signing of the vital info, then to throwing insults instead of the actual words, and finally into aggressively not signing when talking to R&G.

All in all it was totally worth the time and cost to rent!

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narnianarcher·3 days agoAnswer
I’ve been reading this blog for the past three hours or so and just finished the post regarding financial vampires. This reminded me of a dilemma I’ve been struggling with. I’m young and I want to have fun. I don’t want to be 35 and realize that I wasted my 20s worrying about saving money and being responsible. But on the other hand.... I really want to be financially well off. Help me convince myself that I won’t regret not going out every Saturday night.

When we were penniless college students sharing a tiny apartment with a shower so small you’d bump your elbows just lifting your arms to wash your hair, we used to wander the streets at night with our friends.

I remember the night we got dressed up like models and headed down to the wharf to do a fake photo shoot with our friend’s fancy camera from his summer photography class.

I remember the night we dared each other to climb the statue of Paul Revere on his horse. It took three of us to boost our friend Charlie up there and he nearly broke his ankle jumping off because we couldn’t figure out how to get him down again.

I remember the night we played strip poker on the roof of our apartment building because it was hot as balls inside.

I remember playing Mario Kart until the sun rose.

I remember sitting in our tiny kitchen making up songs on my guitar and laughing so loud the neighbors pounded on the walls.

I remember bringing book proposals home from my internship at a literary agency and doing dramatic readings over cheap wine and yesterday’s bread from the bakery across the street.

These memories are priceless to me. And they cost us nothing to create.

I don’t have a single memory like this of going to a bar and dropping a shit ton of money on a Saturday night. We must have done it… but it clearly isn’t as important to me as the time we threw a party to celebrate the anniversary of our friend losing his finger and served finger food and made finger themed decorations and played with Chinese finger traps.

The point is that the memories I cherish have fuck all to do with spending a lot of money to have fun with my friends. I value the times we made our own fun, got creative, and bonded over trying to save our meager incomes. 

Sure, go out to da clerb once in a while. Take a trip once or twice. But don’t fool yourself: this is not what will make you happy. And it certainly won’t make you financially secure. 

I regret nothing… except that we never actually managed to free the harbor seals from the aquarium. And neither should you.

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narnianarcher·3 days agoText

angualupin:

angualupin:

I feel like I need to tell everyone how brilliantly the Globe incorporated a deaf Gildenstern into the 2018 Hamlet and then force all of you to watch it

ok, so Gildenstern is played by a deaf actor, Nadia Nadarajah. he* signs all his lines, and either Rosencratz interprets for him, or the person he’s talking to says something that makes it obvious what he just said, depending. how each character reacts to Gildenstern is completely in-character and often hilarious

  • Claudius and Gertrude are intensely awkward around Gildenstern. they obviously don’t know BSL so they just gesture emphatically but aimlessly when they talk.
  • Hamlet, who of course is friends with R&G, *does* know BSL. he starts off by signing fluently whenever he’s talking to them but, as his distrust of them grows, he signs less and less until he’s only signing the equivalent of “fuck off” whenever he talks
  • Polonius just shouts really loud whenever he tries to talk to Gildenstern

it’s all brilliant and adds another layer of humor and pathos and you should all watch it

*casting at the Globe right now is gender neutral so I’m just going to use the character’s pronouns

guys I know I’m wittering on about this but the thing I want to emphasize is that there is no tokenism here. they didn’t just shove a deaf actor into a speaking role so they could pat themselves on the back about how progressive they are. they went to the effort of fully integrating Nadarajah’s deafness into the story so that it not only fit organically within the narrative but actually enhanced it. watching Hamlet’s signing disintegrate as his trust in R&G disintegrates adds a depth to that storyline I’ve never seen before. Claudius has exactly the awkwardness of someone who thinks of himself as a good person and therefore thinks he’s being kind and generous with his accommodations for disability, but has never even once actually asked a disabled person what they need, which is so on-point for his character it hurts.

I know Michelle Terry gets a lot of hate mail for her policy of race-, gender-, and disability-blind casting, but fuck all those people. long may that policy continue.

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narnianarcher·3 days agoText

vacuously-true:

You don’t have to be passionate about everything you’re good at.

You don’t have to be good at everything you’re passionate about.

It’s nice to have both passion and skill. But with some things, you only have passion, and with other things, you only have skill. That’s okay.

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narnianarcher·4 days agoPhoto

danielxdagaz:

andreashettle:

actuallyblind:

kimboosan:

actuallyblind:

[Image: tweet by Titanium Cranium (@FelicityTC) including three screenshots of a Harry potter book in three different formats on Amazon. Text:

“Harry Potter on Amazon -

Print: $6.39
Audio: $44.99
Braille: $100.00

#CripTax”]

So, let me explain this a bit.

The defenders of CripTax prices will say that those prices cover the cost of production. This is, without a doubt, true. I work at a university where we often have to take written materials and convert them into braille – it takes a LOT of people hours, special software, and a braille embosser.

But those defenders of higher prices are reversing the argument to justify fleecing disabled readers.

What do I mean by that?

Braille is not magic. It is done by taking plain text and feeding it through fairly affordable translation software, creating a document that can easily be printed in braille.

All that time and effort and special software? IS NOT FOR THE BRAILLE.

It is to take the document provided by the publisher (usually in PDF format, the same file they send to the printers) and turn it into plain, unadorned text, by hand. Text has to be “stripped” (OCR/text recognition); images have to be described; footnotes have to be embedded; special pullouts and other formatting shifted or removed. 

Printing in braille is cheap; reverse engineering a finished text to print it in braille IS NOT.

Same with those audio books. After a book is completed and, often, after it has already been published, the publisher arranges to have the book recorded by a professional voice actor/reader, which usually also involves a recording producer, if not a recording studio, which all stacks up to $$, no two ways about it.

However: that cost? IS RARELY FACTORED INTO THE BUDGET OF PRINTING A BOOK.

Oh, it might be, if the author is JK Rowling and it is well known that readers will want audio versions right away. But most of the time, nope, the audio book is produced only after the hard copy book has become a decent seller, and so it’s an extra cost which is claimed must be covered by making the audio version extra expensive to buy. (Even then it’s somewhat ridiculous, since honestly, creating an audio book is, in the end, cheaper than printing, factoring in the cost of paper.)

If publishers factored audio book production into the assumed costs of publishing a book, they would have very little reason to price it higher.

If publishers factored in creating a “plain text” file – including having editors/authors describe images – that could be used to print braille copies or to be used with refreshable braille readers (electronic pinboards, basically), then there would be zero reason to price those books higher.

tl;dr:
Yes, it’s a #criptax, and the excuse that “those formats are more expensive to produce so they have to be priced higher” is only true if you completely throw out the premise that publishers have an obligation to account for disabled readers when they are actually budgeting for and publishing the book.

I’m really glad you brought this up, because this is exactly the sort of argument thatpeople try to use to justify inaccessibility in all kinds of areas. When we tell a company that their website or appliance or piece of technology isn’t accessible, they frequently tell us that they are sorry to hear that but that the accessibility is too expensive and time-consuming to add in now. There is also a provision in the law that allows companies to not bother including accessibility in their products if the cost of building in the accessibility is more than 5% of the total cost to build the whole product in the US.

That seems reasonable on the surface, doesn’t it? Except here’s the thing—the accessibility should have been a part of the original plans to begin with and designed in from the very beginning and should have been considered a necessary element and just another ordinary part of the cost of producing the product, not some extra feature that can be opted out of if it’s too expensive. The problem is that these companies do not understand the fact that if you cannot afford to build the product with the accessibility included, then you cannot afford to build the product and that is that. It’s exactly the same as not being able to afford to make the product with all elements up to safety and health codes and standards. If you can’t afford to meet the legal standards, then you can’t afford to make the product, and it’s that simple. Accessibility is not an exception to this and it should not be considered as such. It should be just as much an ordinary required part of the design process as any other element, not an extra, shiny, fancy feature that you can just choose not to bother with if it costs a little bit of money.

Accessibility should be part of the standard design process just as much as safety codes and health standards and other legal regulations. The ADA has existed for 20 years so companies have had ample time to catch up and learn to plan for accessibility from the beginning as a part of the standard required design process. If you can’t afford to create the product fully up to code, standards, and accessibility laws, then you simply can’t afford to make the product. No excuses, no exceptions.

I have often said that, very often, the high cost of disability accessibility is not actually for the accessibility itself. The actual high cost is often due to the lack of foresight and planning for accessibility from the design stage onwards.

Let me explain what I mean with an example. Take accessibility in a building. Usually making a building accessible means you need things like braille signage, ramps to entrances, wide doorways that leave plenty of room for a wheelchair to pass through, and so forth. If you design a new building from scratch to incorporate all of these design elements from the beginning, literally before the building is a hole in the ground, then the total cost of integrating accessible features into the building is less than one percent of the total cost of constructing that building.

On the other hand, if you don’t bother to account for the need for disability access and just build the building first, and then go, “oops, we didn’t design for accessibility”, then you will need to literally tear down parts of the building and reconstruct it from scratch. If this is your primary approach to accessibility, then of course the cost of accessibility may seem expensive. But it’s not actually the ramp or the wide door ways that are expensive. What is expensive is all the extra cost and effort of completely undoing parts of what you had already created wrongly so that you can recreate it correctly. In other words, the actual expense is the lack of planning ahead for accessibility.

This is the first I learned how books could be more cheaply accessible if this was planned for ahead of time. But it’s the same principle at work. Unfortunately, most people don’t understand all this and blame disabled people for wanting accessibility instead of blaming designers, architects, inventors and book publishers, and so forth, as well as the people responsible for contracting them, for having failed to consider the needs of disabled people when there was still time to integrate accessibility during the design and initial construction phase, when it could have been done cheaply.

What we need is for more designers, architects, inventors, book publishers, policy makers, program managers, and so forth to learn about the principles of universal design.

#always reblog

narnianarcher
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narnianarcher·4 days agoPhoto

ilsa-fireswan:

derinthescarletpescatarian:

contranym-xendo:

fluffmugger:

srsfunny:

More Beautiful After Being Broken

What this trite imagery misses out on is the fact that kintsukuroi requires a lot of work to repair a piece like that.  It takes a lot of time, a lot of effort, a great deal of investment.  Sometimes parts of the original are damaged beyond repair, and you have to instead painstakingly create entirely new ones.  

It’s still not the same.  Maybe it’s something more beautiful. But it’s not the fact that it broke that makes it beautiful. It’s the work put into it.  It’s the fact that people made the effort to salvage it, because it was worth salvaging, because it was important enough to salvage.      It’s the care that makes the beauty.  

An apology can’t always fix what has been broken.  That doesn’t mean it’s not irreparable, sometimes you can go on to rebuild and repair.  But it won’t ever be the same as it was again.   

I really appreciate this addition because I’ve always hated the “more beautiful for having been broken” thing. Being broken sucks and I hate all those tragic romantic sensitivities that try to make it what it’s not. These pieces are beautiful because they’re repaired with effort put in to making them shine.

That bowl is NOT more beautiful for having been broken. It’s more beautiful for having been very skillfully repaired.

Kintsugi is A Metaphor on so many levels. Even

I have a friend who does it and he frequently works on my time-worn pieces so he can stay in practice. So few people think it’s worth the time and cost to repair something that breaks, even when they have a strong sentimental attachment.

The traditional lacquer used for the base layers is toxic until it cures and the handler must be trained to avoid taking in the toxins while trying to repair the vessel. New synthetic lacquers avoid that issue and make Kintsugi more widely available (but also mean that in the Etsy age people without training can make something that has the look but lacks the true core repair.)

Each layer goes on paper thin and then must cure for many days before a new layer is added. Failure to cure will result in a bond that does not hold.

The precious metals layers go on just as thin and require cure time for each layer.

When repaired, the vessel will not be the same. Repaired correctly a bowl will be food safe but it won’t be useable in the same way. The most obvious in this day is that no matter the original, it’s now hand wash only, do not microwave.

The difference in join quality between a trained master and an amateur is visible. You can feel it when you touch the damaged areas. It might not matter to you, but the difference is there. My observation is, the more you learn about how it should be, the less willing you are to accept less.

Start to finish the work will take months and can take years. The greater the damage, the longer the time. Remember that cure time? It’s measured in weeks per layer. Plus not every repair can be worked on at the same time. Sometimes you have to repair one crack before you can start on a different one.

It is beautiful for having been skillfully repaired

narnianarcher
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narnianarcher·5 days agoText

clintbartoncomics:

sometimes life is really hard and in those times of struggle clint barton comes to me and tells me to drink coffee about it

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narnianarcher·5 days agoText

elodieunderglass:

It also just goes to show that all the dudes who have fretted about the Robot Apocalypse for generations needed to hang out outside with dogs more

trebornosnibor:

Well this is just beguiling

gallusrostromegalus:

While I can’t fault your reasoning on robot taxonomy, apparently we’re both wrong:  Arwen, as much as she is a high-prey-drive animal, is foremost, a herding dog, and has decided that the Lawn Roomba is a SHEEP.

What happened is the lawn roomba belongs to the guy that does most of the maintainence on the neighborhood park, and he had it out grazing on a different section of lawn when my parents came down for a walk and Arwen was siezed by 200 years worth fo Kelpie Instincts, rolled out of her Harness and proceded to herd the shit out of this tiny, oblivious robot.  

Everything was on display- mock-stalking, intimidating eye contact, barking, running in front of it to try to get it to balk, the scariest barking she can muster (which is actually.  pretty scary if you’re not used to Loud Dogs), looking back at my parents for directions.  or rather, looking at my Mom while Dad tried unsuccessuflly to capture her.

After about ten minutes they realized she wasn’t biting it, and decided to let her play Sheep Simulator 5000 for a while. She eventually figured out that 

  • It  doesn’t respond to Yelling, Posturing or Aggressive Eye Contact
  • It does respond to having it’s wheels or bump hazards hit 
  • It would respond to its side being nosed or slapped by moving in a different direction

Conent that this was apparently some kind of blind, deaf and particularly stupid sheep, she could now manage the robot by smacking it if it got too close to the creek bed or fence for her liking, and was eventually content to sit on the highest point of the field and Supervise ™ it.

“Hey.” Said Roger, owner of the robot. “Do you think if I put the ramp down she’ll herd it into the back of my pickup?”

Arwen was mostly asleep in the afternoon sun as roger put the ramp down but woke right up when mom Whistled, then pointed at the truck.  She immediately went after the robot and did something that wouldn’t have occured to me, an allegedly more intelligent being: the robot is roughly triangular, and when it hits an obstacle, will change direction so that one of its other sides (rather than points) is now the ‘front’.  So to get it to move in a straight line in the direction she wanted, Arwen would smack the two sides of the robot that she didn’t want it to go in in quick sucession, and got it across the field, over a small hill and up the ramp as fast as it’s clumsy little wheels could go.

“I didn’t know you had a fully-trained sheepdog!” Said Roger

“Me either.” said Mom.

So Arwen now has a Semi-Weekly Appointment to play with Sheepbot.

theodorepython:

Of course it’s a prey animal it fucking eats GRASS

gallusrostromegalus:

So one of my neighbors has a lawn Roomba or whatever they’re called, and this thing trundles around looking like a background robot in the background of the original trilogy, and ABSOLUTELY BAFFLING THE DOGS.

They have concluded, I think, that it’s some kind of prey animal because right after this video ended they decided to crouch down and stalk it, which means I’m 90% sure I’m going to have to stop Arwen from eating it at some point.

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