sinobug

sinobug

SINOBUG

CHINESE INSECTS AND SPIDERS Amateur macrophotography of an Australian living in China. (ALL BLOG IMAGES ARE MY OWN) DEFINITION: Sino- /ˈsʌɪnəʊ / a combining form meaning “Chinese”, as in Sino-Tibetan; Sinology. Origin - from French; from Late Latin Sīnae - the Chinese; from Late Greek Sinai; from Arabic Sīn. bug /bʌg/ 1. (loosely) any insect or insect-like invertebrate. 2. a person who has a great enthusiasm for something; fan or hobbyist. Origin - ”insect,” 1620s (earliest reference is to bedbugs), probably from M.E. bugge; “person obsessed by an idea” (e.g. firebug) is from 1841. Sinobug /ˈsʌɪnəʊ bʌg/ an expat Australian in China with a passion for entomological photography. Origin: Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia; currently Pu’er, Yunnan, China After five years in Beijing, I moved to Pu'er (Simao), Yunnan in south-western China in mid-2011. I won't deny that part of the reason was to pursue my photography passion. Yunnan is reknowned as a flora and fauna mecca - China's Amazon. And indeed, everything (insect-wise) is bigger, brighter, more abundant and more bizarre than elsewhere. I had always been interested in biology, zoology and the natural world with an emphasis on all things small, most notably the insects. Initially this took the form of killing and pinning specimens and thankfully (and more appeallingly) progressed to photography. My full portfolio is viewable on Flickr as itchydogimages..... #flickr_badge_source_txt {padding:0; font: 11px Arial, Helvetica, Sans serif; color:#000000;} #flickr_badge_icon {display:block !important; margin:0 !important; border: 1px solid rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;} #flickr_icon_td {padding:0 5px 0 0 !important;} .flickr_badge_image {text-align:center !important;} .flickr_badge_image img {border: 1px solid black !important;} #flickr_www {display:block; padding:0 10px 0 10px !important; font: 11px Arial, Helvetica, Sans serif !important; color:#3993ff !important;} #flickr_badge_uber_wrapper a:hover, #flickr_badge_uber_wrapper a:link, #flickr_badge_uber_wrapper a:active, #flickr_badge_uber_wrapper a:visited {text-decoration:none !important; background:inherit !important;color:#000000;} #flickr_badge_wrapper {} #flickr_badge_source {padding:0 !important; font: 11px Arial, Helvetica, Sans serif !important; color:#000000 !important;} www.flickr.com undefined I have a secondary blog, SINOPHILE (http://sinophilia.tumblr.com), which contains those things concerning my life in China that don't belong in SINOBUG, including my (non-insect/arachnid) photography, reblogs of things that interest me, things that should be shared and an avenue for me to respond to other bloggers and their posts (for better or for worse). (NB. This page has been dormant for some time.)

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Fun Fact

Furby, that creepy 1990's doll, has a tumblr page.

sinobug·9 hours agoPhoto

MOULT: (verb) /mōlt/ /moʊlt/ - that visually and conceptually tortuous trauma of erupting out of your own skin multiple times throughout your life to accomodate growth

An Assassin Bug Nymph (Rihirbus sp., Reduviidae) moults into its next instar…

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE

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sinobug·10 days agoPhoto

Lychee Stink Bug Nymph (Tessaratoma papillosa, Tessaratomidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE

See more images of the nymphal forms of Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs in my photostream HERE
… and adult Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs HERE.

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sinobug·11 days agoPhoto

Long-horned Orb-weaver Spider (Macracantha arcuata, Araneidae)

This is the female. The males are diminutive in size and look completely different.
As members of the orb-weaver family of spiders, they build large circular webs in the forest understory. Despite their bizarre appearance, they are as docile and harmless as your garden-variety orb-weaver.
The purpose of the dramatic horns remains unstudied, but theories include: a demonstration of reproductive prowess; a difficult subject for predators to swallow; function as counterbalances so the spider can position itself securely in its web (similar to a tightrope walkers pole); and they are very effective at breaking up the spider’s body profile against a shadowy background of dappled vegetation and sky, rendering them invisible.
Several colour forms occur. This white morph occurs in southern China. Elsewhere in South-east Asia, they can be orange, red or all-black.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu'er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE

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