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philamuseum · 3 hours ago
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Niki de Saint Phalle began her "Nanas" series in 1964, commandeering a French term for “girls” often considered patronizing and turning it into a means of female empowerment. Unlike many images throughout Pop Art that sexualized the bodies of women, de Saint Phalle’s "Nanas" are forces of joy and hope.
See this portrait on view in "Pop Art: A New Vernacular" through February 6.
"Nanas (Figure of a Woman)," 1968, by Niki de Saint Phalle  © Niki Charitable Art Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
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philamuseum · a day ago
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Pioneering artist Edna Andrade was born on this day in 1917. Andrade was a Philadelphia-based artist and a leader in the Op Art movement, which was characterized by artworks that created optical illusions. 
Get inspired by Andrade's grid drawings with this Art Kids at-home project.
"Mariposa," 1983, by Edna Andrade © Estate of Edna Andrade. "Black Cisoide," 1971, by Edna Andrade © Estate of Edna Andrade. "Moonlight (Landscape)," 1992, by Edna Andrade © Estate of Edna Andrade. "Grid Drawing," c. 1976-1977, by Edna Andrade © Estate of Edna Andrade.
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philamuseum · 3 days ago
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French painter Édouard Manet was born on this day in 1832. He was one of the first artists to paint modern life, and was a major figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism. This painting, Manet's first known seascape, is an imaginative depiction of an American Civil War naval battle fought off the coast of France, near Cherbourg, on June 19, 1864. See this work and more by Manet on view in our European Art Galleries.
"The Battle of the USS 'Kearsarge' and the CSS 'Alabama'," 1864, by Édouard Manet
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philamuseum · 3 days ago
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French-Cuban artist Francis Picabia was born on this day in 1879. For this painting, the artist was inspired by a dance he saw while on his honeymoon in the Italian countryside near Naples. The vivid colors and swirling motion of the two dancing girls, which Picabia fragmented into a dense patchwork of angular planes to create an effect of kaleidoscopic movement, capture the excitement of the outdoor festival. See this work on view in our European art galleries.
"Dances at the Spring," 1912, by Francis Picabia © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 
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philamuseum · 4 days ago
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Born on this day in 1896, Caroline Durieux was an American printmaker, painter, and educator. Best known for her satirical lithographs, Durieux spent most of her life in New Orleans and Mexico, but she attended graduate school at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia.
"Queen of the Carnival at the Boston Club," 1946, by Caroline Durieux. "Lovers," 1974, by Caroline Durieux. "Ponce de Leon Beauty Salon," by Caroline Durieux. "Park in Rio," 1943, by Caroline Durieux.
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philamuseum · 4 days ago
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Andy Warhol often appropriated photographs of celebrities from magazines and newspapers to reinforce an individual's public image rather than creating his own artistic interpretation. After the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963, the artist chose photographs of Jacqueline Kennedy used in media accounts. Here, the combination of four pictures brilliantly condenses and intensifies the numbing effects of the mass media coverage that shaped the nation's experience of this shared tragedy.
See this portrait on view in "Pop Art: A New Vernacular" through February 6.
"Jackie (Four Jackies) (Portraits of Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy)," 1964, by Andy Warhol © Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 
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philamuseum · 5 days ago
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Cristóbal Balenciaga was born on this day in 1895. With this dress, the couturier was inspired by his Spanish heritage and reinterpreted a flamenco dancer’s full, flounced dress. Black organza petals cascade down the skirt front, softly framed by the cutaway skirt of a removable white cotton overdress.
"Woman's Evening Ensemble: Dress, Overdress, Bustle, and Petticoat," Spring 1951, designed by Cristóbal Balenciaga 
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philamuseum · 6 days ago
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Sidney Goodman was born in Philadelphia on this day in 1936. Known for balancing realism with strong symbolic undercurrents, Goodman often depicted his family and friends in everyday settings, strongly hinting at underlying emotional and metaphysical themes.
"Figures in a Landscape," 1972–73, by Sidney Goodman © Estate of Sidney Goodman
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philamuseum · 7 days ago
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Happy birthday to iconic photographer and master of disguise Cindy Sherman. Best known for her conceptual portraits, Sherman pushes us to explore concepts of copy and original, creator and object, and the human condition. Her self-portraits invite viewers to take a closer look as there’s always more than meets the eye.
"Untitled #137," 1984, by Cindy Sherman © Cindy Sherman
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philamuseum · 7 days ago
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“Painting from nature is not copying the object; it is realizing one’s sensations.” Born on this day in 1839, Paul Cézanne interpreted our world through radical use of colors, brushstrokes, and composition. His paintings took Impressionism into new territory, introducing ideas that contributed to the development of Modern art. Visit this painting and more by Cézanne in our New European Galleries. 
"The Large Bathers," 1900–6, by Paul Cézanne
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philamuseum · 8 days ago
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The cyanotype printing process Frederick DeBourg Richards used for this work involved combining two chemicals to produce photographic prints in ethereal shades of blue, which here echo the hues of the sea and sky. See this photograph on view in our installation "Seascapes." 
"Wagons on Beach," around 1885–90, by Frederick DeBourg Richards
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philamuseum · 9 days ago
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In honor of MLK Day, we are sharing this work entitled “Your Choice” by Emma Amos which depicts Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X alongside one another. The work itself can be displayed in two different orientations, with one figure facing upward while the other is upside down. No matter how you choose to view it, Amos presents the two men as connected and inseparable, capturing the essence of contrasting philosophies bound by a shared pursuit of racial justice.
Today is your last chance to see this work on view in "Emma Amos: Color Odyssey." 
"Your Choice," 1998, by Emma Amos (Amos Family, courtesy of RYAN LEE Gallery, New York)
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philamuseum · 10 days ago
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Richard Benson made straightforward and sensitive portraits of people and things he loved. His subjects include the diverse spaces people create for themselves, which Benson viewed as “living rooms” that help us recover from the continuous disruptions of our technological age. Learn more about the artist's subjects in "Richard Benson: The World Is Smarter Than You Are," on view through January 23. 
"Newfoundland," 2008, by Richard Benson © Estate of Richard M. A. Benson
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philamuseum · 11 days ago
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Today we're keeping warm with these hats from our collection. Happy National Hat Day!
"Woman's Hat (Beret)," 1960s, by Emme Inc., New York. "Woman's Hat," around 1965, designed by James Galanos. "Woman's Knit Hat: Statue of Liberty," around 1994, designed by Adrienne Sloane. "Woman's Hat," 1950s, designed by Sally Victor.
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philamuseum · 12 days ago
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Born on this day in 1841, Berthe Morisot was a core member of the French Impressionist group. She depicted scenes of everyday life with dynamic brushstrokes and a keen eye for color, and her talent was praised by her contemporaries—a rarity at the time for a woman artist.
See this portrait by Morisot on view in our New European Galleries.
"Young Girl with Basket," 1892, by Berthe Morisot 
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philamuseum · 13 days ago
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Renowned in photography circles for his inventiveness at printing and his impact as a teacher and dean at the Yale University School of Art, Richard Benson is best known today for the remarkable photography books he helped produce and the prints he made of other artists’ work. "Richard Benson: The World Is Smarter Than You Are" puts his photography at the center of these other achievements. Don't miss this exhibition on view through January 23. 
"Ohio," 2009, by Richard Benson © Estate of Richard M. A. Benson
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philamuseum · 14 days ago
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John Singer Sargent, who was born on this day in 1856, is best known as the leading portrait artist of his generation. Raised by American expats, Sargent’s family moved around Europe until they settled in Paris. Throughout his career, he traveled the world immortalizing his adventures. Sargent produced almost 900 oil paintings and over 2,000 watercolors.
See this painting by Sargent on view in our New European Galleries.
"In the Luxembourg Gardens," 1879, by John Singer Sargent
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