foxthebeekeeper
foxthebeekeeper
The Golden Fox's Bees!
Just a sort of log for the adventures of a friendly neighbourhood beekeeper! ^^ All of my header formatting was reset because Tumblr mobile stinks. Non-bee-related posts are tagged with "not bees".
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foxthebeekeeper · 255 days ago
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titsay:

Bumblebutts 🐝✨

5K notes
foxthebeekeeper · 280 days ago
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Y'all really like bees, huh?

78 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 301 days ago
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Hi, wonderful work with bees (I really don't know much about them). And just wonderful images. What does the "Fox" refer to? Thanks, Geoff

Thank you for the kind words!

And in regards to Fox, that’d be what lol ^

49 notes
foxthebeekeeper · a year ago
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There are LOTS of gals on the Water Bricks™ today! It’s super sunny but it’s still only about 45f out. It’s kind of neat seeing how many are out and about just with this momentary bit of sunshine.

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foxthebeekeeper · a year ago
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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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oddlywyld:

Happiest little bumbler

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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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inkmaze:

here’s some more of my honeybee+bumblebee pics.. bumble landing or taking off in the last one!

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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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0rpheus038:

“I am watching bees.”
Laurie R. King The Beekeeper’s Apprentice

PostPostPost
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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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Hey! I’m doing a course on honey bee anatomy and have a question I can’t find an answer to anywhere...thought you might have some insight?

Why are drone bees so damn hairy?! Workers obviously need it for pollen collection, queens aren’t really hairy but drones are super fluffy (especially on their thorax)...do we know why? Does it provide flight stability? Keep their flight muscles warm?! WHYYYYYY???

That is an exceptionally interesting question that I unfortunately have no good answer for.

We know that it’s not for gathering pollen. Not for keeping warm. Not for attracting a mate to my knowledge. I can’t imagine that it would provide more stability but it may help coushion the blow when they dive-bomb their targeted queen-to-be.

This is something that I’ll have to keep an eye out for when playing around with the fuzzy babies this spring. To see if I can spot any unique habits or tendencies. Excellent question!

66 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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Hey! I’m doing a course on honey bee anatomy and have a question I can’t find an answer to anywhere...thought you might have some insight?

Why are drone bees so damn hairy?! Workers obviously need it for pollen collection, queens aren’t really hairy but drones are super fluffy (especially on their thorax)...do we know why? Does it provide flight stability? Keep their flight muscles warm?! WHYYYYYY???

That is an exceptionally interesting question that I unfortunately have no good answer for.

We know that it’s not for gathering pollen. Not for keeping warm. Not for attracting a mate to my knowledge. I can’t imagine that it would provide more stability but it may help coushion the blow when they dive-bomb their targeted queen-to-be.

This is something that I’ll have to keep an eye out for when playing around with the fuzzy babies this spring. To see if I can spot any unique habits or tendencies. Excellent question!

66 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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veiligplekje:

Beehives in the Netherlands

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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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effervescentaardvark:

In my garden - busy bees :)

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foxthebeekeeper · 2 years ago
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Just missed some workers from big blue escorting a drone out of the hive and tossing him over the edge. I always knew they did this but I had never seen it done in person before today!

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foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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There are bees chilling out on the bottom of these bricks and I cannot tell why. There’s water everywhere (just rained) so I don’t think it’s that.

Maybe there are some minerals leeching out of the bricks there??

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foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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Do you know the science of how royal jelly makes a queen bee just that? Have experiments been done to male bees fed royal jelly? What is royal jelly made of? Etc. Thank you!

These are actually very interesting questions and I am going to have to research that now!

All I know is that royal jelly is suuuuuuper nutrient dense. Like the healthiest substance in existence. And that all bees get a bit of it to start off, but at some point in development they are switched to pollen and that prevents them from turning in to a queen. I’m interested on the male bee part too because I can’t say I’ve heard of that before.

I’ll be back with report! (Eventually…stay tuned!)

2K notes
foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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I think I have hive beetle larvae in an old hive that’s been empty for 9 months, do I have to get rid of the empty frames that have larvae on them?

I would take a torch to any comb with hive beetle larvae. Or maybe start a nice bonfire. You can try to pick them all off but there are always more. Always. As soon as you see a larva about a cm long it’s too late to salvage that comb because the layers of eggs are too deep. Best just to cut the comb out of those frames and burn it. (Not the frames, you can bleach and re-use those!!)

14 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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Random q that you've probably answered and is probably obvious, buy how do bee's choose a queen? Like whats the process?

Using a suddenly missing/dead queen as an example from a couple asks ago, the bees will go around the brood where the old queen recently laid eggs and select a few random healthy workers and start turning them all in to queens at the same time. The first queen to emerge will then hunt down the other queen cells and kill the unemerged queens within. If two or more queens emerge at the same time, they will make an adorable little beeping noise called piping, which is basically their battle cry. They use that to find each other. Once they meet they fight to the death and the surviving queen goes on to rule the hive.

(100% of this is true go look it up please it’s so interesting)

236 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
Answer

Random q that you've probably answered and is probably obvious, buy how do bee's choose a queen? Like whats the process?

Using a suddenly missing/dead queen as an example from a couple asks ago, the bees will go around the brood where the old queen recently laid eggs and select a few random healthy workers and start turning them all in to queens at the same time. The first queen to emerge will then hunt down the other queen cells and kill the unemerged queens within. If two or more queens emerge at the same time, they will make an adorable little beeping noise called piping, which is basically their battle cry. They use that to find each other. Once they meet they fight to the death and the surviving queen goes on to rule the hive.

(100% of this is true go look it up please it’s so interesting)

236 notes
foxthebeekeeper · 3 years ago
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Two questions, what’s your favorite type of bee and what is a hive beetle?

My favorite type of bee….. that’s a hard one because I’m really tied between honeybees (of course) and an especially poofy and small kind of bumble bee we have here. (https://entomologytoday.org/common-eastern-bumble-bee-bombus-impatiens/)

And a hive beetle is a teeny tiny little beetle that likes to invade honeybee hives and eat honey and cause mischief. If their numbers grow too fast and the larvae breach the honey stores. They can “slime” the hive, which basically ferments all the honey and makes that comb uninhabitable. (Very low res pic of a slimed hive because it’s honestly super nasty) (https://www.afuturewithbees.com/resources/protect-your-bees/53-hive-beetle-101 , unknown)

17 notes