Tumgir
#Giovanni Gigli
myfunkybdaytv · a year ago
Text
Juventus signing Ronaldo, was an expensive mistake, we have to let him go - former president Giovanni Gigli
Juventus signing Ronaldo, was an expensive mistake, we have to let him go – former president Giovanni Gigli
Juventus signing Ronaldo, was an expensive mistake, we have to let him go – former president Giovanni Gigli Continue reading
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
2 notes · View notes
naijadiary · a year ago
Text
“Free Cristiano Ronaldo At The End Of The Season, He's An Expensive Mistake” - Former Juventus President, Giovanni Gigli
“Free Cristiano Ronaldo At The End Of The Season, He’s An Expensive Mistake” – Former Juventus President, Giovanni Gigli
Former Juventus President, Giovanni Gigli has stated that signing Cristiano Ronaldo from Real Madrid, was an expensive mistake. According to him, the Italian club should be looking to free Cristiano Ronaldo at the end of the season. Recall that Juventus put a striking deal with Real Madrid in place during the summer of 2018, to the five-time Ballon d’Or winner. At first, the club reaped financial…
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
0 notes
mary-tudor · 8 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
[Quaestiones de observantia quadragesimali (ff. 1v-67); Poem in praise of Henry VII's marriage to Elizabeth of York and of the birth of prince Arthur (ff. 67v-86v)]
Netherlands, 1487.
Provenance: “Presented by Giovanni Gigli of Lucca (b. 1434, d. 1498) to Richard Foxe (b. 1447/8, d. 1528), royal secretary to king Henry VII, administrator, bishop of Winchester, and founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: dedication texts (ff. 1v, 67v-69v), Tudor heraldic devices (f. 2), royal arms (f. 70).”
Notes: “The full borders (ff. 2v, 19, 27v, 52, 70), were added, probably in England. Giovanni Gigli of Lucca's poem celebrates the marriage of Henry VII (r. 1485-1509) to Elizabeth of York in 1486 and the birth of their first son Arthur (b. 1486, d. 1502), prince of Wales. 
Gigli later became bishop of Worcester (1497-98).
The text on quadragesimal observance was originally written for John Russell, described as keeper of the privy seal (1473-83) and bishop of Lincoln (1480-94) (rubric on f. 2): the text therefore must date from 1480-83 when John Russell occupied both of these positions. Another copy of this text exists, made in England at the end of the 15th century or beginning of the 16th century (New Haven, Beinecke Library, ms. 25).
Link: https://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=4248&CollID=8&NStart=336
26 notes · View notes
minervacasterly · 4 months ago
Text
🌹~The Peacemaker Queen - The Importance of EOY's Marriage to Henry VII~ 👑
Tumblr media
For Elizabeth, marriage to Henry Tudor, wasn't just the culmination of her mother's ambitions, but hers as well. Like most women in this era, especially royalty, she knew her worth and that England would never be comfortable with accepting a Queen Regnant. The question had never been on her or anyone's mind, rather it was whom she'd marry. Naturally, it had to be someone who would benefit her maternal family. That someone happened to be Henry after his armies defeated Richard III's at Bosworth.
England would not have a Queen Regnant until the following century, in Elizabeth and Henry VII's granddaughters, Mary I and Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. But as Royal Consort, Elizabeth had considerable power over others.
"For women of all social classes in the late fifteenth century, becoming a wife marked a signficant change in status. While running her own household brought a woman a degree of autonomy, it also brought her into a new state of dependence, making her virtually a held in legal terms, subject to the control of her husband, for better or worse. Marriage and motherhood were the ultimate social goal, contracted for mutual benefit as well the advancement of an entire family. As the wife of the King, although not yet crowned in her own right, Elizabeth was the highest-ranking female in the land but still subject to her husband's rule" (Amy Licence, Elizabeth of York)
In another biography of her written by Alison Weir, it is pointed out that the poet Giovanni de Gigli "conjures a charming -probably imaginary- portrait of the princess on her wedding day".
"Your hymeneal torches now unite
An keep them ever pure. O royal maid,
Put on your regal robes in loveliness.
A thousand fair attendants round you wait
Of various ranks, with different offices,
To deck your beauteous form. Lo, these delights
To smooth with ivory cob your golden hair
And hat to curl or braid each shining tress
And wreath the sparkling jewels round your head,
Twining your locks with gems; tis one shall clasp
The radiant necklace framed in fretted gold.
About your snowy neck; while that unfolds
The robes that glow with gold and purple dye,
And fits the ornaments with patient skill
To your unrivalled limbs; and here shall shine
The costly treasures from the Orient sands:
The sapphire, azure gem that emulate
Heaven's lofty arch, shall gleam, and softly there
The verdant emerald shed its greenest light,
And fiery carbuncle flash forth rosy rays
From the pure gold."
As beautiful as this image is, it is likely to have been done to make the union seem more glorious. Elizabeth would not have worn white at her wedding since it was not a popular color, but instead she would probably have worn purple which was the color of royalty or one of her best gowns. But the purpose behind this poem and many others was clear. The union of the white and red rose was being widely celebrated.
The couple's firstborn was Prince Arthur who was born on September 1486. Shortly after her churching was over, she was crowned Queen of England. She gave birth to several more children, three who lived past infancy. It was those three that would outlive their parents as Prince Arthur died while he was still in his teens. Henry VII was the first to break. Elizabeth consoled him and told him that they were young and could still have more children and then when she went to her chambers to mourn in private, Henry came to her and returned the favor, consoling her as well.
The couple did have another child but regrettably it died, and so did Elizabeth, nine days after she had given birth to Princess Katherine, on her birthday, of all days.
She was buried at the Lady Chapel at Westminster where her husband joined her six years later. The two are still buried there.
Shakespeare's presentation of Henry VII's union to Elizabeth of York. His play "Richard III" ends with Richmond aka Henry VII, being crowned and taking Elizabeth of York as his wife. This alternative history was became the official narrative that to this day, has persisted. While it is true that Henry and EOY's union was seen as a union between the red rose of Lancaster and the white rose of York, the truth is that their marriage did not put an end to the dynastic strife between both Houses. In fact, there were many descendants of both houses that remained, some of them which included Katharine of Aragon, her only surviving child with Henry VIII, Mary I, and the Kings of Spain. These descended from John of Gaunt via his second marriage to Constance of Castile (daughter of Pedro I "el Cruel"). As for the York descendants, some of these included the people that Henry VIII executed, people he had once been very close to.
In her documentary series "Britain's Biggest Fibs" first episode, Lucy Worsley also highlights Henry VII's dubious claim to the throne & the importance of his marriage to Elizabeth of York and how this was presented to the public, creating a new narrative that has remained the official narrative since then.
This has led some revisionist historians to take a contrarian view, swinging the pendulum to the other side, suggesting that the union between the two was an unhappy one. This is based on one of the Spanish ambassadors who wrote to The Catholic Kings (KOA's parents) that Elizabeth of York was Queen only in name, her mother-in-law, being the true Queen of her son's court. This cannot be farther from the truth and as with every source, it must be put into context. The Catholic Kings were the most powerful couple at the time, a union of equals. Undoubtedly, the Spanish ambassador's opinion was based on what he had seen of his masters' union back home, and like many, he regarded Elizabeth's claim stronger than Henry. Hence, he viewed Henry as a parvenu with his mother's influence at court as an affront to the woman whose bloodline was greater than his.
Henry's actions speak the opposite. After the bad press her mother and her predecessors had received, the last thing Elizabeth may have wanted was to be seen as a meddlesome figure. Her intention of becoming a pious figure and a role model for women, was successful. And as had been stated, her relationship with her husband grew stronger in spite of the challenges they faced.
For more information on the first royal Tudor consort, I recommend the following books and individual biographies:
1. Elizabeth of York by Alison Weir
2. Elizabeth of York by Arlene Okerlund
3. Elizabeth of York by Amy Licence,
4. Tudor by Leanda de Lisle
5. The Woodvilles by Susan Higginbotham.
I also recommend my breakdown of Lucy Worsley's "Britain's Biggest Fibs" first episode where she discusses Tudor propaganda: https://www.facebook.com/592377904263929/photos/a.592380994263620/721656271336091/?type=3&theater
34 notes · View notes
richmond-rex · 9 months ago
Quote
The first-born daughter of King Edward has been declared Duchess of York; it is positively asserted that the King is about to marry her, which everybody considers advantageous for the kingdom. The King himself is deemed most prudent and element: all things appear disposed towards peace.
Giovanni dei Gigli, Collector of Peter’s Pence in England, to Pope Innocent VIII; London, 6 December 1485 (Calendar of State Papers Venice, 1202-1509)
56 notes · View notes
avrahamsinai · 2 years ago
Text
Vi è una grande differenza fra le opere degli uomini e quelle di Dio. Un'accurata e profonda indagine mentre evidenzia i difetti e le imperfezioni delle une, pone in risalto lo splendore delle altre. Anche l'ago più fine, e su cui l'uomo ha profuso la sua arte, se guardato al microscopio, mostrerà imperfezioni, grossolanità e asperità.
Ma se si potesse puntare il microscopio sui fiori di un campo, non si otterrebbe tale risultato. Invece di diminuire la loro bellezza, se ne scoprirebbe altra e più delicata che era sfuggita all'occhio nudo; bellezze che ci fanno tenere in giusto conto, poiché altrimenti non avremmo avuto il corretto intendimento, la piena forza del detto del Signore: "Guardate i gigli del campo, come non cardano la lana, né filano, né tessono: eppure vi assicuro che nemmeno Salomone in tutta la sua gloria, fu mai vestito come uno di loro". La stessa legge è valida anche nei paragoni fra la Parola di Dio e le più eccellenti produzioni umane. Vi sono imperfezioni e difetti anche nei prodotti più ammirati dell'ingegno umano. Ma più si investigano le Scritture, più minutamente esse sono studiate, più è evidente la loro perfezione; ogni giorno vengono portate alla luce nuove bellezze e le scoperte della scienza, le ricerche degli studiosi e l'opera dei miscredenti, tutto concorre ad esplicitare la meravigliosa armonia di tutte le sue parti e la divina bellezza che ne ammanta l'intero.
Se ciò vale per le Scritture in generale, è in special modo vero per le Scritture profetiche, che costituiscono la base e la pietra angolare della presente opera. Non vi è mai stata alcuna difficoltà nella mente di qualsiasi protestante illuminato nell'identificare la donna "seduta su sette monti" con il suo nome scritto sulla fronte: "Mistero, Babilonia la Grande", con l'apostasia romana.
Nessun'altra città al mondo è mai stata tanto celebrata come la città di Roma, a motivo della sua posizione su sette colli. Gli oratori e i poeti pagani, che non pensavano di spiegare profezie, l'hanno similmente definita come "la città dai sette colli". Così Virgilio si riferì ad essa: "Roma è diventata la più bella (città) del mondo, e si è circondata di sette alture come di una muraglia".1 Properzio parimenti parla d'essa (aggiungendo solo un'altra caratteristica, che completa il quadro apocalittico) come "L'elevata città su sette colli, che governa il mondo intero".2 Il suo "governare il mondo intero" è proprio la controparte dell'affermazione divina "che regna sui re della terra" (Riv. 17:18). Gli abitanti di Roma la chiamavano città "dai sette colli" come se questo nome descrittivo fosse il suo nome proprio. Perciò Orazio parla d'essa riferendosi ai suoi sette colli, quando dice: "Gli dèi che hanno posto la loro affezione sui sette colli".3 Marziale similmente parla dei "sette monti che dominano".4
Nei tempi successivi tale linguaggio divenne d'uso corrente; per cui quando Simmaco, prefetto della città, e ultimo pontefice massimo pagano, in qualità di sostituto dell'imperatore, presentando per lettera un suo amico ad un altro, lo chiama "L'uomo dei sette monti", "un uomo dai sette monti" che vuol dire, come lo interpretano i commentatori "Civem Romanum", "Cittadino Romano".5 Orbene, mentre questa caratteristica di Roma è stata ben identificata e definita, è sempre stato facile mostrare che la chiesa che ha la sua sede ed il suo quartier generale sui sette colli di Roma può molto appropriatamente esser chiamata "Babilonia", inquantoché si tratta della sede dell'idolatria del Nuovo Testamento, come l'antica Babilonia era la sede principale dell'idolatria del Vecchio. Recenti scoperte in Assiria, messe in relazione con la precedente ben nota ma mal compresa storia e mitologia del mondo antico, dimostrano che nel nome di Babilonia la Grande vi è un significato più vasto e profondo di quanto non si creda. È ben noto che il papismo è paganesimo battezzato; ma Dio adesso sta rendendo manifesto che il paganesimo che Roma ha battezzato è in tutti i sui elementi essenziali, il vero paganesimo che prevaleva nell'antica letterale Babilonia, quando Geova aprì dinanzi a Ciro le porte a due battenti di rame, e spezzò le sbarre di ferro.
Questa nuova ed inattesa luce, in un modo o nell'altro applicherebbe, in questo stesso periodo, sulla Chiesa della Grande Apostasia, lo stesso linguaggio e i simboli che l'Apocalisse ha preparato anticipatamente per noi. Nella visione apocalittica, è proprio prima del giudizio su di lei che, per la prima volta, Giovanni vede la chiesa apostata con il nome di Babilonia la Grande "scritto sulla fronte" (Riv. 17:5). Che vuol dire quel nome scritto "sulla fronte"? Non indica certamente che proprio prima del suo giudizio, il suo vero carattere si sarebbe sviluppato, di modo che chiunque avesse occhi per vedere, che avesse un minimo di discernimento spirituale, sarebbe stato costretto, per l'evidenza dei suoi occhi, a riconoscere come meravigliosamente appropriato il titolo applicatole dallo Spirito di Dio? Il suo giudizio sta approssimandosi in maniera evidente; e man mano che s'avvicina, la Provvidenza di Dio, assieme alla parola di Dio, per mezzo della luce versata d'ogni parte, rende sempre più evidente che Roma è effettivamente la Babilonia dell'Apocalisse; che il carattere essenziale del sistema, i grandi oggetti della sua adorazione, le sue feste, le sue dottrine, il suo sacerdozio con i suoi ordini, derivano tutti dall'antica Babilonia; e, infine, che il Papa stesso è veramente e appropriatamente il rappresentante in linea diretta di Baldassarre.
Nella guerra che è stata intrapresa contro le pretese di dominio di Roma si sono accumulate sufficienti evidenze del suo orgoglioso vanto, e cioè che essa è la madre e la signora di tutte le chiese ― l'unica Chiesa Cattolica, al di fuori della quale non vi è salvezza. Se mai potesse esservi qualche scusante per tale modo di trattarla tale scusa non durerebbe a lungo. Se la posizione che io ho assunto può essere mantenuta, essa dev'essere spogliata completamente del nome di Chiesa Cristiana; poiché se fosse stata la Chiesa di Cristo ad essere convocata quella notte, quando il re-pontefice di Babilonia in mezzo alle migliaia dei suoi principi "loda gli dèi d'oro e d'argento, e di legno e di pietra" (Dan. 5:4), allora la Chiesa di Roma dovrebbe portare il nome di Chiesa di Cristo; altrimenti no. Questa apparirà senza dubbio ad alcuni una posizione molto estrema; ma è questo ciò che quest'opera si propone di stabilire; e lasciamo che sia il lettore a giudicare se io non abbia portato sufficienti evidenze per sostenere la mia posizione.
Tumblr media
28 notes · View notes
feuillesmortes · 2 years ago
Photo
Tumblr media
British Library MS Arundel 66 is one of the finest of all English Medieval and Renaissance scientific manuscripts. The manuscript has been firmly dated to the year 1490 and, since the nineteenth century, has been associated with Henry VII. On fol. 201, the king is depicted enthroned and surrounded by his courtiers while he receives astrological prognostications for the coming year with the support of a distinguished nobleman, labeled with the arms of Louis II, Duke of Orleans, later Louis XII, King of France. Sophie Page has suggested that this image represents the king as ‘‘a significant mover on the world stage with events of widespread impact on his realm: the fertility of the land, warfare and plague.’’ It also suggests that Henry VII was a ruler who chose to make strategic use of astrology and did so with the full backing of church and state at home and abroad.
“A more convincing reading of the miniature is that it represents a window onto the court at the time the king’s astrologer presented him with astrological predictions for the coming year. If we accept this thesis, there are, besides the king and the Duke of Orleans, several individuals who may be identified, albeit tentatively, on the basis of their regalia. In the 1490s, the Archbishop of Canterbury (with the cross and miter) was Cardinal John Morton and the Chancellor of the Exchequer (with the sword of state) was the soldier Sir Thomas Lovell. Of the lesser courtiers, William Parron would be the astrologer making the presentation: he wears a hood that is folded around his neck like that of a scholar. While Duke Louis dominates the foreground, it is actually Parron who holds the book while the duke supports the offering with one hand. Behind Parron there is another kneeling figure who wears a distinctive brimless high-crowned cap. This may be intended as one of the king’s Italian humanist secretaries, such as Giovanni Giglis or Filippo Alberici. While these identifications help to flesh out the intended audience of Arundel 66, they unfortunately bring us no closer to identifying either the donor or the designer of the manuscript.”
— Henry VII’s Book of Astrology and the Tudor Renaissance by Hilary Carey
35 notes · View notes
italiancultmovies · 3 years ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
In 🇮🇹 & 🇬🇧 29/06/2000
🇮🇹 Ricordiamo Oggi un Mito del Cinema ... il Grande Vittorio Gassmann
🇬🇧 Today we remember a myth of cinema ... the Great Vittorio Gassman
🇮🇹 ... nato Vittorio Gassmann (Genova, 1º settembre 1922 – Roma, 29 giugno 2000), è stato un attore, regista, sceneggiatore e scrittore italiano, attivo in campo teatrale, cinematografico e televisivo.
🇬🇧 Vittorio Gassman, born Vittorio Gassmann; 1 September 1922 – 29 June 2000), popularly known as Il Mattatore, was an Italian theatre and film actor, as well as director.
He is considered one of the greatest Italian actors and is often remembered as an extremely professional, versatile, and magnetic interpreter, whose long career includes both important productions as well as dozens of divertissements (which made him greatly popular).
🇮🇹 Soprannominato "il Mattatore" (dall'omonimo spettacolo televisivo da lui condotto nel 1959), e dal Grande Film del 1960 , è considerato uno dei migliori e più rappresentativi attori italiani, ricordato per l'assoluta professionalità (al limite del maniacale), per la versatilità e il magnetismo. Artista con profonde radici nel mondo del teatro più "impegnato", fu fondatore e direttore del Teatro d'arte Italiano.
La lunga carriera in Italia e all'estero comprende produzioni importanti, così come dozzine di divertissement che gli diedero una vasta popolarità.
È inoltre ritenuto uno dei "mattatori" della commedia all'italiana con Alberto Sordi, Ugo Tognazzi e Nino Manfredi un quartetto al quale è generalmente accostato anche Marcello Mastroianni
“Debutto”
Il suo debutto cinematografico è del 1945, in Incontro con Laura, di Carlo Alberto Felice: la pellicola è andata perduta, e il suo primo film superstite è Preludio d'amore (1946), di Giovanni Paolucci. Nel 1947 si fa conoscere dal grande pubblico con Daniele Cortis, di Mario Soldati e due anni dopo coglie il suo primo grande successo con Riso amaro, diretto da Giuseppe De Santis, uno dei capolavori del primo neorealismo. Nello stesso anno recita nel film Una voce nel tuo cuore di Alberto D'Aversa, dove interpreta un giornalista al fianco di Constance Dowling, Nino Pavese e Beniamino Gigli.
“Anni sessanta “
Gli anni sessanta si rivelarono molto gratificanti per la carriera cinematografica di Vittorio Gassman, sulla scia del grande successo ottenuto nel 1958 con I soliti ignoti di Mario Monicelli, che ebbe anche due seguiti (Audace colpo dei soliti ignoti, 1959, di Nanni Loy; e il tardo I soliti ignoti vent'anni dopo, 1985, di Amanzio Todini).
Monicelli lo rivelò anche ottimo attore di ruoli comici (come anche in La grande guerra, 1959, e nel dittico L'armata Brancaleone, 1966, e Brancaleone alle crociate, 1969) ed egli acquistò in breve una vasta notorietà con prodotti più popolari, specie sotto la regia di Dino Risi: oltre al già citato Il mattatore (1960), Il sorpasso (1962), La marcia su Roma (1962), I mostri (1963), Il gaucho (1964), Il tigre (1967) e Il profeta (1968).
“Anni settanta e ottanta”
Sempre per gli schermi italiani, Gassman è tornato a lavorare con Risi (In nome del popolo italiano, 1971; Profumo di donna, 1974; Anima persa, 1977; Caro papà, 1979; Tolgo il disturbo, 1990) e ha avviato un proficuo sodalizio con Ettore Scola (C'eravamo tanto amati, 1974; La terrazza, 1980; La famiglia, 1987); all'estero si è fatto invece apprezzare in Un matrimonio di Altman (1978), La tempesta di Mazursky (1982), Benvenuta di Delvaux (1983), La vita è un romanzo di Resnais (1983) e Sleepers di Barry Levinson (1996) e altri ...
8 notes · View notes
here4myownworld · 3 years ago
Text
Tenors: Franco Corelli, Giacomo Lauri-Volpi, Carlo Bergonzi, Giuseppe di Stefano, Aureliano Pertile, Benamiano Gigli, Tito Schipa, Giovanni Martinelli, Enrico Caruso, Mario del Monaco, Ramon Vinay, Lauritz Melchoir, Flaviano Labo, Helge Rosvaenge, Jan Peerce
Baritones and Basses: Ettore Bastianini, Tito Gobbi, Apollo Granforte, Gino Bechi, Renato Cappechi, Leonard Warren, Giuseppe Taddei, Mattia Battistini, Carlo Tagliabue, Afro Poli, Lawrence Tibett, Tita Ruffo, Paolo Silveri, Cesare Siepi, Ezio Pinza, George London, Boris Christoff, Hans Hotter, Feodor Chaliapin, Gottlob Frick
Sopranos & Mezzos: Renata Tebaldi, Maria Callas, Leontyne Price, Bidu Sayao, Birgit Nilsson, Gianna d’Angelo, Rosa Ponselle, Anna Roselle, Licia Albanese, Kirsten Flagstad, Lotte Lehmann, Anna Moffo, Leyla Gencer, Ebe Stignani, Giulietta Simionato, Fedora Barbieri, Shirley Verrett, Antonietta Stella, Zinka Milanov, Rise Stevens, Fiorenza Cossoto, Elena Obraztsova, Victoria de Los Angeles,
6 notes · View notes
opera-ghosts · 6 months ago
Text
Rigoletto - Giuseppe De Luca
Gilda - Marion Talley
Duca di Mantova - Beniamino Gigli
Maddalena - Jeanne Gordon
.....................................
Beniamino Gigli was the foremost Italian tenor of the 1920s through the 1940s, possessed of a smooth, lush voice with a lyric sweetness often described as "honeyed." He became a Metropolitan Opera star, singing 28 roles there, and was a legitimate heir to the tenor Enrico Caruso, who had died at the beginning of the 1920s. No one person could fill Caruso's shoes, but it was widely conceded that Gigli inherited his lyrical and romantic parts, while Giovanni Martinelli took over the more heroic roles. Gigli was also one of the most-beloved performers of Italian song, with a special gift for the traditional Neapolitan repertoire. His singing was heavily mannered by modern standards, characterized by sobs, catches, and portamenti, but it had an inherent beauty and sincerity that are still easy to appreciate. Although an even more stylized actor than singer, Gigli had a successful film career, appearing in almost 20 films.Gigli began his singing career as a child, performing for treats and coins at a local café. At age 7, he entered the choir of Recanati Cathedral, where his father was Sacristan. When he was 15 and still a boy soprano, he was recruited to sing the heroine in an operetta in the nearby city of Macerata; he did the production in drag! When he was 17, he moved to Rome to live with his brother, a student of sculpture; the two led a bohemian existence, frequently cold and hungry, until Gigli was offered a position as a servant in a wealthy household. There he was provided with room and board and given afternoons off to practice or to take lessons with a local teacher, Agnese Bonucci, who offered to teach him at no cost.During World War I, a music-loving colonel saw to it that he was posted to a non-combat position in Rome and also encouraged him to audition at the famous Academia di Santa Cecilia, where his evident musical talent led them to waive the normally required piano examination. He studied there for two years, and upon graduation won the famous Parma vocal competition. On the strength of that, he was offered roles at various small opera houses and made his official opera debut as Enzo in La Gioconda at Rovigo in the fall of 1914. By December 1916, he made his Rome Opera debut as Faust in Boito's Mefistofele. When the war was over, the recording company HMV set up a studio in Milan, and it was there that Gigli began his extensive recording career. In 1918, he made his La Scala debut also as Boito's Faust in a performance conducted by Toscanini. The next year, he made his first appearance in the Americas as Cavaradossi in Tosca at the Teatro Colon. His Met debut followed in November 1920, also as Faust, and he sang there every season until 1932.His Covent Garden debut was not until 1930, as Andrea Chénier. After World War II, which he mostly spent in Italy, he largely restricted his singing to concert performances; his last public appearance was in May 1955, at a concert in Washington, D.C., ending a professional career of 41 years.Gigli was one of the first singers to make complete opera recordings, including a particularly fine Andrea Chénier (EMI) and Cavalleria rusticana and Pagliacci released as a set on Nimbus. Among his solo CDs, a two-disc set on Pearl (Gemm) captures him in his youthful prime.
6 notes · View notes
richmond-rex · 10 months ago
Note
At least Penn's artistic license about Elizabeth of York's hair gets the color right. Elsewhere in the book he's talking about Juana of Castile and says that Henry "took in Juana's jet-black hair and feline eyes, and he embraced her in welcome, perhaps a little too long." But of course Juana's hair wasn't jet-black but reddish, like her sister Katherine's, and I'm also unclear if they "embraced her a little too long" thing is actually derived from any source or if Penn just imagined it.
Oh, Thomas Penn is really not my cup of tea. I have complained about his sensationalistic approach to history here, and a little bit more here (and here's someone else's two cents). Philippa Gregory, who notoriously hates Henry VII, has praised Penn's work so you get the idea. It is true that contemporary depictions show Juana to have had reddish hair so Penn gets her hair colour wrong, but we have no contemporary evidence that Elizabeth of York had 'strawberry blonde' hair either. Elizabeth's famous portrait is actually a late 16th-century copy but there are at least three contemporary descriptions of her hair: two of them (the Crowland Chronicle's and a wedding poem by Giovanni Gigli) said she had 'golden hair'; a third one (made by a herald of the College of Arms, so he wasn't really concerned with artistic purposes) said she had 'fair yellow hair'. It sounds like Elizabeth was pretty much a conventional golden/yellow blonde.
As for Juana's visit, there's actually no detailed firsthand account of how Juana or Henry behaved to each other during her visit to Windsor in 1506. The ambassadorial report only says she arrived at Windsor one day and was 'graciously welcomed by the King of England and her sister the Princess of Wales'. Two days later Henry VII left for Richmond but Juana (unlike her husband) didn't follow the English court and returned to the place she had been staying in Dartmouth. The source for Henry's reputed attachment to Juana comes from one of Catherine of Aragon's letters to her sister urging her to accept Henry's marriage proposal (25 October 1507), saying Henry felt the greatest affection for Juana. In truth, whilst he negotiated for a marriage with the Queen of Castile he was also negotiating a marriage with Margaret of Austria, regent of the Netherlands (so much for a deep attachment). In that letter, Catherine tries to bait her sister by saying that if Juana married Henry VII she would 'become the most noble and the most powerful Queen in the world'.
In that letter Catherine even ventures to mention what Henry’s own council had said to him, an information she would have had no easy access to. The letter was written a day after Catherine told her father of a curious episode that took place between herself and Henry VII regarding Ferdinand's promise to marry her to Prince Henry:
For instance, he has told me, and also the King of England, that an ambassador of his, who is in France, has written to him, saying the King of France told him that when he saw your Highness he asked you if my marriage was to take place, and that your Highness said it had not taken place, nor did you believe it would be concluded. The King of France told this to the ambassador of the King of England, that he might give his master information of it. When Doctor De Puebla said so to me, I answered nothing. But when the King of England told me, I answered that I could not bear to have such a thing said as that your Highness had spoken differently from what you had written in your letters. I also gave him to understand that your Highness could not say that a thing would not be done which was already irrevocable.
It's a very distraught letter to her father, and it seems Catherine came close to despairing about her marriage prospects. She begs her father to talk to Henry VII about his marriage with Juana, probably thinking this would advance her own marriage with Prince Henry. In view of what was probably devastating news for Catherine, her letter cajoling her sister into accepting a marriage proposal with Henry VII makes much more sense. She tries to paint Henry VII in the most perfect light, saying:
He is a Prince who is feared and esteemed at the present day by all Christendom, as being very wise, and possessed of immense treasures, and having at his command powerful bodies of excellent troops. Above all, he is endowed with the greatest virtues, according to all that your Highness will have heard respecting him.
Considering how much Catherine complained about Henry's treatment of herself to Ferdinand, we shouldn't attribute much meaning to her words beyond empty flattery. Sensationalistic historians such as Penn, though, have taken them at face value. A little speculation (all those sentences starting with 'perhaps', 'maybe', 'must have') every now and then is one thing, but we should take circumstantial evidence into account. Those are my two cents, at least 🌹x
14 notes · View notes
mary-tudor · 6 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
I posted 505 times in 2021
76 posts created (15%)
429 posts reblogged (85%)
For every post I created, I reblogged 5.6 posts.
I added 132 tags in 2021
#tudor dynasty - 30 posts
#henry vii - 19 posts
#house of tudor - 16 posts
#tudor england - 14 posts
#mary tudor - 11 posts
#primary sources - 11 posts
#tudor edit - 10 posts
#henry viii - 7 posts
#mary i - 7 posts
#queen mary of england - 7 posts
Longest Tag: 137 characters
#i honesty detest how people see her as a terrible woman based only on movies such as lady jane and a book out there who paints them badly
My Top Posts in 2021
#5
Tumblr media Tumblr media
[Quaestiones de observantia quadragesimali (ff. 1v-67); Poem in praise of Henry VII's marriage to Elizabeth of York and of the birth of prince Arthur (ff. 67v-86v)]
Netherlands, 1487.
Provenance: “Presented by Giovanni Gigli of Lucca (b. 1434, d. 1498) to Richard Foxe (b. 1447/8, d. 1528), royal secretary to king Henry VII, administrator, bishop of Winchester, and founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: dedication texts (ff. 1v, 67v-69v), Tudor heraldic devices (f. 2), royal arms (f. 70).”
Notes: “The full borders (ff. 2v, 19, 27v, 52, 70), were added, probably in England. Giovanni Gigli of Lucca's poem celebrates the marriage of Henry VII (r. 1485-1509) to Elizabeth of York in 1486 and the birth of their first son Arthur (b. 1486, d. 1502), prince of Wales. 
Gigli later became bishop of Worcester (1497-98).
The text on quadragesimal observance was originally written for John Russell, described as keeper of the privy seal (1473-83) and bishop of Lincoln (1480-94) (rubric on f. 2): the text therefore must date from 1480-83 when John Russell occupied both of these positions. Another copy of this text exists, made in England at the end of the 15th century or beginning of the 16th century (New Haven, Beinecke Library, ms. 25).
Link: https://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=4248&CollID=8&NStart=336
22 notes • Posted 2021-10-16 16:51:49 GMT
#4
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
“Opening page from the ratifications of the treaty of perpetual peace between Henry VIII and François I, made at Amiens, 18th August 1527. At the top left of the page is a portrait of François and the page depicts the arms of France and his personal badge – a salamander – with the motto Nutrisco et extinguo.”
Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2572808807/in/faves-benedikte/
22 notes • Posted 2021-10-29 23:51:31 GMT
#3
Tumblr media
22 notes • Posted 2021-10-17 01:29:32 GMT
#2
Tumblr media
Romola Garai as Queen Mary I of England.
54 notes • Posted 2021-06-12 20:13:09 GMT
#1
Tumblr media
66 notes • Posted 2021-06-24 17:20:15 GMT
Get your Tumblr 2021 Year in Review →
1 note · View note
levysoft · 3 years ago
Link
[...] Dunque, cosa impariamo di più del polimorfico Wilde? Che “da adolescente pensò di diventare cattolico romano (e per questo il fratello ha minacciato di diseredarlo)”, che, studente a Oxford, fu insediato tra i massoni, nel 1875, che chiese di essere impiegato nell’azienda di John Ruskin per il gusto di stare di fianco a uno dei suoi miti, che “avrebbe voluto fare l’ispettore scolastico, secondo l’esempio di Matthew Arnold – e dobbiamo ringraziare la provvidenza se non ha realizzato questo intento” (così Anthony Quinn nella divertita recensione pubblicata dal Guardian). Sfarfallii inutili, si dirà. In questo caso, pare non sia vero perché anche l’alluce biografico di Wilde ha l’evidenza di un’opera letteraria. Dal tour statunitense del 1882, per dire, Wilde torna con un amore da appendersi alla camicia. “Quando penso all’America, ricordo soltanto labbra come petali cremisi di una rosa estiva, occhi come agata oscura, il fascino di una pantera, il graffio di una tigre, la grazia di un uccello”, scrive Oscar alla misteriosa lei, nominata semplicemente ‘Hattie’. Beh, il baldo biografo ha scoperto l’identità della felina fanciulla, riassunto del creato tutto: si chiama Harriet Crocker, all’epoca aveva 23 anni, ed era “figlia di una magnate delle ferrovie di San Francisco”. Che la tizia avesse i soldi lo dimostra, tra l’altro, un ritratto del 1887, griffato Giovanni Boldini, in cui ‘Hattie’ appare nella sua ruggente bellezza. Wilde, come si sa, passata la passione, portò all’altare, in un florilegio di pettegolezzi, Constance Lloyd. D’altronde, il divo che alla dogana di New York pronunciò la frase fatidica, “non ho nulla da dichiarare tranne il mio genio”, fece, in Usa, un mezzo fiasco: a Washington una donzella, evidentemente ignifuga al suo carisma, sbottò, “si tagli i capelli e si presenti con dei pantaloni più lunghi”. Effetti del divismo.
La domanda, ad ogni modo, resta: perché c’importa ancora di Wilde? Propongo alcune risposte.
a) La moda. Wilde cavalca la moda dello scandalo a tutti i costi – capisce, per dire, l’importanza del sesso e del corpo nella fedina estetica di un uomo ‘pubblico’ – più lo offendono più rilancia, esagerando. Usa lo stesso meccanismo degli uomini dello spettacolo via social: non risponde alle accuse, reclama una attenzione sempre più morbosa. Wilde crea nuove mode, sta sempre ‘sul pezzo’, è imbarbarito dal desiderio di fama. Il recensore del Times gongola scrivendo di Wilde: “Quando Sarah Bernhardt arrivò in Inghilterra nel 1879… Wilde le gettò una bracciata di gigli… Tempo dopo, la diva ricordò gli ‘occhi luminosi e i lunghi capelli’ del suo nuovo amico poco più che ventenne. Questo è l’Oscar che conosciamo: sempre in posa, floreale all’eccesso, paladino del bello, opportunista, seguace delle star”. La parola precisa è star-stalker. Wilde vuole essere amico di tutti quelli che contano e essere ammesso dappertutto. Per poi sputtanare tutto.
b) Affascina che un uomo “fisicamente poco attraente – goffo, dinoccolato, faccione” con un talento non certo assoluto, abbia avuto il successo che avuto. Merito del carisma. “Per Dante Gabriel Rossetti e Algernon Swinburne era un signor nessuno”: lui riuscì a diventare il “sacerdote dell’estetismo”. Un uomo sostanzialmente modesto, sa imporsi in modo duraturo, seppellendo molti più talentuosi di lui.
c) Nel mondo del reality perpetuo, della dichiarazione continua, dell’asfissia social, Oscar Wilde, pioniere di un individualismo un po’ pacchiano, ha dimostrato non tanto che la vita è un’opera d’arte ma che il mondo è un palcoscenico. Ha recitato. Ogni cosa che ha scritto non ha l’autenticità della confessione, non dice il vero: Wilde scrive per il lettore, tutto è posa, nudità data in pasto al guardone.
d) La dissipazione. Gli ultimi anni di Wilde sono una profezia allucinata, un molosso a squarciarti le cosce. Povero, vagabondo, braccato, senza soldi e senza denti, grasso. Rubava per procacciarsi spiccioli. Ha pisciato in testa al bel mondo finché tutti gli hanno voltato le spalle: è precipitato, ed è questo a rendercelo simpatico, “è diventato la sentinella della sua catastrofe”, scrive Sturgis. Non si chiede altro, alla vita, in fondo: giocarsi in una posa, inabissarsi in una poesia, anelare che gli applausi dei fan si trasformino in glaciale condanna, consapevoli che tra palco e altare sacrificale, tra stage e patibolo non c’è differenza. (d.b.)
1 note · View note
italiancultmovies · 3 years ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
In 🇮🇹 & 🇬🇧 29/06/2000
🇮🇹 Ricordiamo Oggi un Mito del Cinema ... il Grande Vittorio Gassmann
🇬🇧 Today we remember a myth of cinema ... the Great Vittorio Gassman
🇮🇹 ... nato Vittorio Gassmann (Genova, 1º settembre 1922 – Roma, 29 giugno 2000), è stato un attore, regista, sceneggiatore e scrittore italiano, attivo in campo teatrale, cinematografico e televisivo.
🇬🇧 Vittorio Gassman, born Vittorio Gassmann; 1 September 1922 – 29 June 2000), popularly known as Il Mattatore, was an Italian theatre and film actor, as well as director.
He is considered one of the greatest Italian actors and is often remembered as an extremely professional, versatile, and magnetic interpreter, whose long career includes both important productions as well as dozens of divertissements (which made him greatly popular).
🇮🇹 Soprannominato "il Mattatore" (dall'omonimo spettacolo televisivo da lui condotto nel 1959), e dal Grande Film del 1960 , è considerato uno dei migliori e più rappresentativi attori italiani, ricordato per l'assoluta professionalità (al limite del maniacale), per la versatilità e il magnetismo. Artista con profonde radici nel mondo del teatro più "impegnato", fu fondatore e direttore del Teatro d'arte Italiano.
La lunga carriera in Italia e all'estero comprende produzioni importanti, così come dozzine di divertissement che gli diedero una vasta popolarità.
È inoltre ritenuto uno dei "mattatori" della commedia all'italiana con Alberto Sordi, Ugo Tognazzi e Nino Manfredi un quartetto al quale è generalmente accostato anche Marcello Mastroianni
“Debutto”
Il suo debutto cinematografico è del 1945, in Incontro con Laura, di Carlo Alberto Felice: la pellicola è andata perduta, e il suo primo film superstite è Preludio d'amore (1946), di Giovanni Paolucci. Nel 1947 si fa conoscere dal grande pubblico con Daniele Cortis, di Mario Soldati e due anni dopo coglie il suo primo grande successo con Riso amaro, diretto da Giuseppe De Santis, uno dei capolavori del primo neorealismo. Nello stesso anno recita nel film Una voce nel tuo cuore di Alberto D'Aversa, dove interpreta un giornalista al fianco di Constance Dowling, Nino Pavese e Beniamino Gigli.
“Anni sessanta “
Gli anni sessanta si rivelarono molto gratificanti per la carriera cinematografica di Vittorio Gassman, sulla scia del grande successo ottenuto nel 1958 con I soliti ignoti di Mario Monicelli, che ebbe anche due seguiti (Audace colpo dei soliti ignoti, 1959, di Nanni Loy; e il tardo I soliti ignoti vent'anni dopo, 1985, di Amanzio Todini).
Monicelli lo rivelò anche ottimo attore di ruoli comici (come anche in La grande guerra, 1959, e nel dittico L'armata Brancaleone, 1966, e Brancaleone alle crociate, 1969) ed egli acquistò in breve una vasta notorietà con prodotti più popolari, specie sotto la regia di Dino Risi: oltre al già citato Il mattatore (1960), Il sorpasso (1962), La marcia su Roma (1962), I mostri (1963), Il gaucho (1964), Il tigre (1967) e Il profeta (1968).
“Anni settanta e ottanta”
Sempre per gli schermi italiani, Gassman è tornato a lavorare con Risi (In nome del popolo italiano, 1971; Profumo di donna, 1974; Anima persa, 1977; Caro papà, 1979; Tolgo il disturbo, 1990) e ha avviato un proficuo sodalizio con Ettore Scola (C'eravamo tanto amati, 1974; La terrazza, 1980; La famiglia, 1987); all'estero si è fatto invece apprezzare in Un matrimonio di Altman (1978), La tempesta di Mazursky (1982), Benvenuta di Delvaux (1983), La vita è un romanzo di Resnais (1983) e Sleepers di Barry Levinson (1996) e altri ...
5 notes · View notes