Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#archaeology
chaotic-archaeologist · 2 days ago
Note
What are your favorite places non academics can read about archeology in an easy to understand way (without losing important details)?
The Smithsonian Magazine has pretty good, easy to understand coverage!
If you're also open to video content, I will forever and always recommend Time Team as a great informational program that's accurate and accessible to non academics. You can watch full episodes for free on their official YouTube channel!
I'm going to tag @midden-maiden because I know that public archaeology and outreach is something that she's passionate about.
-Reid
174 notes · View notes
Text
This new accidental find by an unnamed Brit totals 1,300 gold pieces which appear to be handmade coins from the first century CE. The Iron Age Celtic coin hoard is thought by researchers to date the reign of the warrior queen Boudica, who led her people in revolt against the Roman occupation of Britain. The discovery of the coin hoard is already causing excitement among researchers for its potential to reveal new information about Iron Age Britain.
Tumblr media
 Experts believe these coins—known as staters—were minted and likely buried during the reign of Boudica. She reigned over the Celtic Iceni tribe whose lands covered modern-day Norfolk. After her husbands's death, the fierce leader led a rebellion against Britain's Roman overlords. According to Tacitus, her forces killed about 70,000 Roman troops and sympathizers before she was brutally suppressed. Historians believe the turbulence of her time may have led to increased hoarding during the first century CE.
141 notes · View notes
tiny-librarian · 9 hours ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
On November 26th, 1922, Egyptologist Howard Carter, in the presence of Lord Carnarvon, Carnarvon’s daughter Evelyn, and various others, made a tiny hole in the doorway of the newly discovered Tomb of Tutankamun, with a chisel given to him as a 17th birthday gift by his grandmother. He described the event and what he saw inside in his journal:
It was sometime before I could see, the hot air escaping caused the candle to flicker, but as soon as my eyes became accustomed to the glimmer of light the interior of the chamber gradually loomed before me, with its strange and wonderful medley of extraordinary and beautiful objects heaped upon one another.
There was naturally short suspense for those present who could not see, when Lord Carnarvon said to me ‘Can you see anything?’ I replied to him ‘Yes, it is wonderful.’ I then with precaution made the hole sufficiently large for both of us to see. With the light of an electric torch as well as an additional candle we looked in.
Our sensations and astonishment are difficult to describe as the better light revealed to us the marvelous collection of treasures: two strange ebony-black effigies of a King, gold-sandaled, bearing staff and mace, loomed out from the cloak of darkness; gilded couches in strange forms, lion-headed, Hathor-headed, and beast infernal; exquisitely painted, inlaid, and ornamental caskets; alabaster vases, some beautifully executed of lotus and papyrus device; strange black shrines, with a gilded monster snake appearing from within; quite ordinary looking white chests; finely carved chairs; a golden inlaid throne; beneath our very eyes, on the threshold, a lovely lotiform wishing-cup in translucent alabaster; and, lastly, a confusion of overturned parts of chariots glinting with gold, peering from amongst which was a mannequin.
The first impression suggested the property-room of an opera of a vanished civilization. Our sensations were bewildering and full of strange emotion. We questioned one another as to the meaning of it all. Was it a tomb or merely a cache? A sealed doorway between the two sentinel statues proved there was more beyond, and with the numerous cartouches bearing the name of TutAnkhAmun on most of the objects before us, there was little doubt that there behind was the grave of that Pharaoh.
We closed the hole, locked the wooden-grill which had been placed upon the first doorway, we mounted our donkeys and return home contemplating what we had seen.
Advised the Chief Inspector of the Antiquities Department, who was with us at the commencement of the opening of the first doorway, and asked him to come as soon as possible, preferably the following afternoon to enable us to prepare an electrical installation for careful inspection of this extraordinary and pleasing discovery.
34 notes · View notes
tlatollotl · 8 hours ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Shell pendant, part of shell of a scallop-like bivavle, fan-shaped, the ridges inlaid at intervals with gold foil.
Cultures/periods: Aztec
Production date: 1300-1521
Field Collection by: Weetman Dickinson Pearson, 1st Viscount Cowdray
Findspot: Mexico
Provenience unknown, possibly looted
British Museum
41 notes · View notes
archaeologicalnews · 2 days ago
Text
Preserved baby Neanderthal milk tooth shows earlier emergence than in humans
Tumblr media
An international team of researchers studying a recovered Neanderthal milk tooth has found evidence of baby teeth growing faster and emerging earlier in the extinct human species than in modern humans. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study.
In modern humans, deciduous teeth, also known as baby teeth, or milk teeth, generally emerge from the gums around seven to 10 months of age. They remain in place for approximately six years, when they are replaced by succedaneous or permanent dentition. Prior research has shown that the enamel that covers milk teeth has neonatal lines that mark the point where enamel was produced before and after a baby is born. Prior research has also shown that enamel grows on teeth in a daily cycle, which gives them cross-striations. Read more.
231 notes · View notes
chaotic-archaeologist · 5 hours ago
Note
Is doggerland the closest thing we have to a real life atlantis?
OH NO, BABY, WE HAVE THERA!
Tumblr media
(image source)
Thera was an ancient city on what is now the island of Santorini. Unfortunately that island happened to be the top of a super volcano, and things didn't go so well when that went kaboom. You can see how the top of the island blew off to leave a circular hole in the picture above.
This catastrophic explosion fits nicely with some of the myths surrounding Atlantis and its sudden descent into the sea.
Tumblr media
(image source)
Santorini has lots of ancient ruins dating from between the 9th century BCE and 726 AD. It was occupied by both the Greek and Roman empires.
Now I'm going to tah @door-into-summer, my friendly classicist, because while I know a little bit about this, I'm sure that she'll be able to fact check me.
-Reid
88 notes · View notes
anthroaddict · 2 days ago
Text
Does anyone have any book recs I can ask for for Christmas? Good topics include Middle Ages, Cultural History, Gender History, Ancient Egypt (any ancient civ actually), Classical Age, Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology, etc.
Thanks
27 notes · View notes
goldentangerines · 20 days ago
Text
every now and then i have to think of the roman family from two thousand years ago that buried their little daughter in a boy's athletic-themed sarcophagus and i weep a little because that's the softest declaration of love i can possibly imagine
37K notes · View notes
ancientegyptdaily · 4 hours ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Dendera Temple: the dominant building in the complex is the Temple of Hathor. The temple has been modified on the same site starting as far back as the Middle Kingdom, and continuing right up until the time of the Roman emperor Trajan. The existing structure began construction in the late Ptolemaic period at the time of Ptolemy Auletes in July 54 BCE and the hypostyle hall was built in the Roman period under Tiberius.
112 notes · View notes
specialagentartemis · 10 days ago
Text
People on this website will really mock anti-vaxxers and flat earthers for ignoring scientists and getting their alternative facts from facebook, and then turn around and insist they know more history than historians and more archaeology than archaeologists because they read an unsourced tumblr post once
21K notes · View notes
rumade · 8 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Patchwork quilt floor!
58K notes · View notes
tlatollotl · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Chalchihuitl, plaque, ornament, pendant (carving) made of quartz or jade
Cultures/periods: Classic Maya
Production date: 200-800
Field Collection by: Bryce McMurdo Wright Sr
Findspot: Mexico
Provenience unknown, possibly looted
Blurton, 1997 Jade plaques, pendants and tubular beads formed a significant part of the regalia of Maya dignitaries, priests and rulers (see also Am.1938,1021.25). The appeal of this extremely hard stone lay not solely in its aesthetic qualities, but primarily n its scarcity, which ensured its exclusive use by persons of rank. Among the Maya, jade ornaments were prized more highly than gold. They are likely to have been given as prestigious gifts or as offerings to the gods. Many beliefs and customs were associated with the perceived life-giving properties of jade. Upon the death of a ruler, it was common to place a small piece of jade in the mouth of the deceased in order to ensure his continued spiritual survival. Among the finest jade ornaments are the small flat plaques engraved with the representation of human faces or figures. Many jade pieces are discovered outside an archaeological context and it is thus difficult to assign precise dates or geographical locations.
The plaques are frequently pierced with suspension holes and would have been included in necklaces or headdresses, or worn as separate pendants. In many examples the natural shape of the stone appears to restrict the full representation of the figures which may appear disproportionate or incomplete. The figures engraved on the plaques are notable for their wealth of personal ornament and are shown wearing liberal quantities of necklaces, anklets, armlets, ear ornaments and splendid headdresses. These may be regarded as symbols of wealth, status or allegiance and would have been worn on ritual occasions. The elaborate headdress often takes the form of totemic bird or animal figures (as does this plaque). The Maya practice of cranial deformation, which resulted in the accentuated flattening of the forehead, may also be seen on certain plaques where the head is shown in profile.
British Museum
24 notes · View notes
archaeologicalnews · 2 hours ago
Text
41,500-Year-Old Mammoth Ivory Pendant Found in Poland
Tumblr media
The 41,500-year-old oval-shaped pendant from Stajnia Cave in Poland is the oldest decorated jewelry found in Eurasia.
The ancient pendant made from mammoth bone was found in 2010 along with a horse-bone tool known as an awl.
“This piece of jewelry shows the great creativity and extraordinary manual skills of members of the group of Homo sapiens that occupied the site,” said Dr. Wioletta Nowaczewska, a researcher at Wrocław University.
“The thickness of the plate is about 3.7 mm showing an astonishing precision on carving the punctures and the two holes for wearing it.”
Using advanced methods of radiocarbon dating, Dr. Nowaczewska and colleagues dated the pendant, awl and bone fragments from Stajnia Cave to the Early Upper Paleolithic. Read more.
128 notes · View notes