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#ornithology
histsciart · 4 hours ago
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Happy Feathursday!
Princess parrots (Polytelis alexandrae) are Australian natives, who can lived up to 30 years. These small parrots have long, tapered tails that may grow longer than their bodies. This plated was signed by John Gould and Henry Constantine Richter for Gould's Birds of Australia, Supplement (1869). Undoubtedly, both men were influenced in their creations of scientific illustrations by Gould's wife, Elizabeth, who died in 1841, before this serial publication was finished. View more in Biodiversity Heritage Library (@biodivlibrary) with thanks to Smithsonian Libraries and Archives (@smithsonianlibraries) for digitizing.
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great-and-small · 9 hours ago
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Practice makes perfect!
On this fine Earth day please appreciate these precious baby Sandhill Cranes (called colts) near my apartment getting the hang of flapping and stretching their little wings! Though not much to look at now, these wings will soon grow strong enough to carry these animals hundreds of miles in a single day. It’s so sweet to see them getting more flappy each day!
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longingforrotkehlchen · 13 hours ago
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That cold and calculated look in his eyes. 😰
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Amsel ♂️ (blackbird) auf der Karlshöhe, Stuttgart-Süd.
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histsciart · a day ago
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Happy World Curlew Day!
Curlews (Genus Numenius) are named for their down-curved, crescent moon shaped bills. They use their specialized bills like tweezers to poke around in the mud for prey. Eurasian curlews (Numenius arquata) SciArt from Naturgeschichte der Vögel Mitteleuropas, Bd. 9 (1902) by Carl R. Hennicke. View more in Biodiversity Heritage Library (@biodivlibrary) with thanks to Smithsonian Libraries and Archives (@smithsonianlibraries) for digitizing.
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tiz-aves · a day ago
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[Species] | African stone chat
The African stone chat (Saxicola torquatus) is an old world fly catcher that inhabits sub-saharan Africa and adjectent regions. Like other chats it was previously placed in the Turdidae, a group that chats are convergent, but not closely related to. The binomial name means “collared rock-dweller”.
African stone chats are small birds and have a wingspan of merely 20 centimetres, an average lenght of about 12 centimetres and an average weight of up to 17 grams Males have a black head, back, and tail, with a white half collar, rump and some white patches on the top side of their inner wing. The breast is a sharp orange red. Females are brown rather than black above and on the head with and indistinct paler eyebrow line, and a chestnut-buff rather than orange chest. The plumage of both sexes is slightly duller outside of breeding season.
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They’re non migratory birds that, if at all, move locally. The preferred habitats of these birds are in general montane or open grassland (with scattered shrubs and bushes), grassy hillsides, edges of high altitude forest, swamp edges and farm land.
Most of their diet is made up by insects and larvae thereof, but they also occasionally feed on small vertebrates such as lizards or fish and other inverebtrates. Those, they usually catch from a perch, pouncing on their prey on the ground, but alternatively they may also occasionally catch food-items mid flight.
The female is the only parent to build the nest, which is a deep cup made from dry grass, rootlets, plant stems and usually lined with animal fur or feathers. The nest is placed on the ground or a low bank, at the base of grass tuft or alike. There has been a recording of a pair using a tree as a nest side.
There isn’t much known about the overall population statistics, but as far as scientists can tell, they’re either stable or declining at an extremely slow pace. Due to their wide range and lack of immediate threats, the IUCN has evaluated them to be a species of least concern.
Photo credits: Leon Molenaar, Bernard Dupont
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Buchfink collected all that moss... But then she didn’t know what to do with it.
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Buchfink ♀️ (chaffinch) an der Hasenbergsteige, Stuttgart-West.
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tiz-aves · 2 days ago
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[Species] | Blue dacnis
The blue dacnis (Dacnis cayana) or alternatively the turquoise honeycreeper is a small passerine bird in the Thraupidae, better known as tanagers. It can be found from Nicaragua to Panama, on Trinidad and throughout South America, where they are especially common. 
Tail included the blue dacnis measures about 13 centimetres in lenght, a wingspan of a bit more than 20 centimetres and a weight of barely 13 gram. Adult males are mostly turquoise blue, with a black forhead, throat and back. Adult females and juveniles have a mostly green plumage, with the exception of a blue head, paler green underparts and brown-edged green wings.
Given its wide range, it’s no surprise that the blue dacnis occurs within a wide variety of habitats at eleveations of up to 1200 metres above sea level. The habitats it most commonly occurs in are forest edges, open woodlands and second growth.
A large part of its diet is made up by insects, which it takes from foliage, flowers or alike. Additionally, the blue dcanis feed on fruits, which they tend to swallow whole, and rarely even nectar.
The nesting period is long, lasting from January to September. The female incubates the (usually) two eggs all by herself, but under normal circumstances is fed by the male during that period. The nest is a deep cup made from different plants, typically suspended 5 to 8 metres above ground.
Since it is neither facing any immediate major threats nor is endangered in any other way and at the same time abundant over a widespread range, the IUCN has evaluated it to be a species of least concern. 
Photo credits: Ana Silva, Claudio Marcio
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longingforrotkehlchen · 2 days ago
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Today, on birds disapproving of my presence: My love. ❤️
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Rotkehlchen (European robin) auf der Karlshöhe, Stuttgart-Süd.
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after-the-raven · 2 days ago
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I love it when I hear mockingbirds singing outside my window at —
*checks time*
The godsdamned witching hour.
Are they tryna hook up or summon their feathered eldrtich overlords? Honestly, I'm chill with either, I just wish they'd be quieter about it so they don't screw with my circadian rhythm so much.
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tiz-aves · 3 days ago
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[Species] | Red-breasted merganser
The red-breasted merganser (Mergus serrator) is a sawbill and one of the many species first described by Carl Linneaus in 1758. The name of the genus it is placed in, Mergus, is a Latin word referring to an unspecified waterbird, and serrator means sawyer, from Latin serra, “saw”.
Red-breasted mergansers are large and reach lengths of up to 64 centimetres, a wingspan of anything inbetween 66 to 74 centimetres and a weight of about 0.8 to 1.3 kilogram. Breeding males have a cinnamon chest, a white neck band, and a shaggy green head. Females and nonbreeding males are brownish gray overall with a brownish chin, a dingy breast, and a brown shaggy head. In flight both sexes have a prominent white lower wing panel.
The fastest duck ever recored was a red-breasted merganser that reached a speed of 160 kilometres an hour, while being pursued by an airplane. This broke the previous record, held by a canvasback, by almost 50 kilometres.
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During breeding season they occur around lakes and rivers for the most part, usually within reach of northern forest and tundra regions. In the winter they mostly live in coastal waters, including bays, estuaries and the open ocean. Small parts of the population also winter on ice-free reservoirs and large rivers.
They forage by diving and swimming below water. Although not exactly common, they also somtimes cooperatively hunt in a group, with several birds lining up and driving schools of small fish into very shallow waters, where they scoop them up without diving.
Red-breasted mergansers, like other diving ducks, mainly feed on small fish, but also crustaceans, aquatic insects and if they get the chance, frogs, tapdoles or various kinds of worms as well. Young ducklings almost only eat insects.
The female can lay up to 13 eggs, which it at times lays into the nests of other females or other entirely different species of duck. It is also the only parent to incubate the eggs, which takes about 29 to 35 days. The young are capable of swimming and feeding themselves within one day after hatching and take about 2 months before being capable of flight.
Although their populations globally are believed to be stable, they could possibly be vulnerable due to the fact that they form extremely dense concentrations at certain times and places during migration, such as late autumn on Lake Erie. The IUCN evaluates red-breasted mergansers to be a species of least cocern.
Photo credits: Denis, Erlig Olafsson, Dominic Sherony
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longingforrotkehlchen · 3 days ago
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1. “I’m a happy Mönchy and this is where I belong to...” 🎶 2. – Oh, Mönchy! I’m so glad you are back again!!! – 😒
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Mönchsgrasmücke ♂️ (blackcap) auf der Karlshöhe, Stuttgart-Süd.
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ladylavendula · 4 days ago
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Today’s birberonis.
Today was the first time I was able to sit out in my garden with my camera since moving here; it’s so nice not having to shoot through glass.
It was also my first time seeing a Great Tit here, so glad to see a wider variety of birds visiting.
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