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#Rembrandt
traumacatholic · 22 hours ago
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Balaam's Ass by Rembrandt 1626 Oil on panel, 63 x 47 cm Musée Cognacq-Jay, Paris
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aqua-regia009 · a month ago
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The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (Details), 1632. By Rembrandt
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charlottearthistory · 3 months ago
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‘the man with the golden helmet’ - rembrandt (1650)
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klassizismus · a year ago
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Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert (details). By Rembrandt, 1633
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segretecose · 7 months ago
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Here are some interesting YouTube videos (in English) about some European painters I like:
Caravaggio:
Know the Artist: Caravaggio | Several Circles
Caravaggio: Master of Light | The Nerdwriter
Caravaggio's Masterpiece: Boy Bitten by a Lizard | Perspective
Caravaggio's Taking of Christ | Great Art Explained
Caravaggio: His Life and Style in Three Paintings | National Gallery
The Incredulity of Saint Thomas | The Canvas
Rembrandt:
Why This Is Rembrandt's Masterpiece | The Nerdwriter
Rembrandt: Behind the Artist | Grand Expo
Rembrandt: The Light Behind the Canvas | Biographics
Rembrandt: The Power of His Self Portraits | National Gallery
The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp | The Canvas
Rubens:
Rubens: Too Much for Modern Audiences? | Perspective
'A Classical Subject at a Human Level': Peter Paul Ruben's 'A Satyr Holding a Basket of Grapes' | Christie's
A. Gentileschi:
Know the Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi | Several Circles
Judith Beheading Holofernes, Artemisia Gentileschi | Great Art Explained
Judith Slaying Holofernes | The Canvas
Artemisia Gentileschi in Eight Paintings | National Gallery
Art Restoration of Artemisia Gentileschi's 'Self Portrait' | National Gallery
Goya:
Know the Artist: Francisco de Goya | Several Circles
Understanding Modern Art: Francisco Goya | The Arts Hole
The Most Disturbing Painting in History (Saturn Devouring His Son, Francisco Goya) | The Nerdwriter
J.M.W. Turner:
Romanticism's Divisive Genius: J.M.W. Turner | Perspective
J.M.W. Turner: 'My Business is to Paint What I See' | Christie's
The Genius of Turner: Painting the Industrial Revolution | Turner Project
Understanding Modern Art: J.M.W. Turner | The Arts Hole
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historicalbeauties · 3 days ago
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Rembrandt van Rijn, Adam and Eve, 1638
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traumacatholic · 2 days ago
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The Incredulity of St Thomas by Rembrandt 1634 Oil on oak panel, 53 x 51 cm Pushkin Museum, Moscow
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fieldmoths · 25 days ago
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heaven by monet I and II
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heaven by rembrandt, heaven by mc escher
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heaven by klimt, heaven by hokusai
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heaven by munch, heaven by cassatt
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heaven by van gogh I and II
all made by neuralblender
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lbanksart · a month ago
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The Goldfinch, 1654 - Carel Fabritius - (Art History, lesson 3)
My fascination with the Goldfinch began after reading Donna Tartt’s captivating novel, ‘The Golfinch’, based on the history of one of Fabritius’ only surviving artworks. It is believed by a number of art historians that the original 1654 painting was involved in an explosion the same year it was signed, tragically killing Carel Fabritius and destroying many of his accompanying pieces, (hence the reference to a terrorist attack in the novel, alluding to the original explosion in which the painting was retrieved).
Fabritius worked temporarily as a student for Rembrandt Van Rijn in 1641 and thus, many elements of his early work reflect Rembrandt’s signature style of striking tonal highlights in amongst inexplicably dark shadows. Likewise, this influence is portrayed in the glowing golden tail feather of the goldfinch (as shown above), set apart from the dark shadows of the chained bird in the background. Furthermore, the use of trompe-l’œl oil paint allows for the definitive contrast between defined brush strokes and soft details, as seen in the delicate mark making of the chain against the harsh brushstrokes of the overbearing shadows.
Nonetheless, The Goldfinch was seen as rather an unusual subject for the Dutch Golden Age, due to the simplicity of its composition and lack of focus on neither portraiture nor still life- both common subjects of the time. However, the warm tones and dulled saturation created over time by the oil paints convey the sense that this piece was of its time, due to the fact that cooler tones were very rarely used. This, combined with the artists ability to layer textured brush strokes, gives the piece an almost three-dimensional effect, bringing this common pet to life in a rather charming way.
As a Dutch Baroque painter in the mid sixteen hundreds, Fabritius was inclined to only use paints available to him. In the 15th century, linseed oil began to replace egg tempura as a medium as it dried more slowly and was consequently easier to manipulate and work into. Oil colours allowed renaissance artists and later, baroque painters, to expand the effects of colour and explore realism in a new light. As shown in the images above, Fabritius payed close attention to the correct placement of shadows and highlights and made a conscious effort to capture the character and expression of the subject to create a sense of realism- while simultaneously stepping away from the minute brush strokes and extensive detail often used by renaissance and pre-raphelite painters.
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klassizismus · a year ago
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The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (detail). By Rembrandt, 1632
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eli-zab3th · 3 months ago
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Schutters van wijk VIII in Amsterdam onder leiding van kapitein Roelof Bicker, Bartholomeus van der Helst, ca. 1640 - ca. 1643, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
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philamuseum · 4 months ago
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Happy birthday to the Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, who was born on this day in 1606. A master draughtsman, painter, and printmaker, Rembrandt is considered one of the most significant visual artists in the history of art. Although his works depict a wide range of style and subject matter, his portraits and biblical illustrations are regarded as his greatest successes. This painting is likely the one that was kept by the artist’s family. A 1656 inventory lists a picture hanging in Rembrandt's studio as "a head of Christ, done from life," perhaps evidence that Rembrandt used his neighbors in the Jewish Quarter of Amsterdam as models.
“Head of Christ” around 1648–56, by Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn 
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nobloodnoart · 7 months ago
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Here's the final polished result! The hardest part with polishing is knowing where to stop. I haven't developed this skill yet but i'm working on it with every drawing X) You can see the initial sketch on the left and the final result on the right. you know what's the funniest thing? at least personally for me: i know that i'll hate this drawing tomorrow or in a couple of days coz i'll see a bunch of mistakes and areas for improvement X) do you have the same problem? how do you deal with it?
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