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#Moroccan cuisine
useless-moroccofacts · 2 months ago
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Watch me start a Discourse™️:
Melwi with n*tella & bananas >>>> crêpe with n*tella & bananas
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garlicbutterclutter · 8 months ago
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I made a Moroccan B'Stilla Pie tonight!! It looked really cool and really interesting delicious mix of flavours that I'm not used to!
I didn't emulsify the egg sauce correctly I don't think but it was still a great taste and texture so don't think it matters too much. I'll work on my emulsifying skills some other time!
So happy with how this turned out though!
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mimitakitchen · 9 months ago
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مسمن الفرن بحشوة عجيبة / فطائر مالحة محشوة
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garlicbutterclutter · 9 months ago
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Tonight's meal was lamb meatballs with couscous, roasted butternut squash and homemade pitta bread! Joined a cooking group on fb a couple of months ago and there are some really great recipes being shared (it's Let's Get The Nation Cooking Again if anyone is interested)
Been making a lot of homemade flatbreads of various types lately since they're fairly simple and I can make them when I need them rather than having to plan/buy them before I need them. Gonna have one with feta and salad inside tomorrow - going on a walk/picnic on the hottest day of the year so far lol)
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sarahs-delights · 11 months ago
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Beef Tagine with Apricot and Couscous
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littlethingwithfeathers · 12 months ago
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Quarantine Cuisine: Moroccan Meatballs
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So this is another aped NYT Cooking recipe... Theirs is a little more complicated but through repeated makings, I’ve streamlined a few steps (they do some fanciness with soaking bread in milk and so on... I just use canned bread crumbs). But the seasonings... sauce method... that’s all the same. And dude, dude it’s so good. Let’s go! Meatballs
1/3 cup bread crumbs.
2 pounds ground beef (or lamb or venison)
1 large egg, beaten
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2  teaspoon black pepper
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon turmeric
2 teaspoons paprika
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
Sauce
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 sweet or yellow onion, finely diced
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 cinnamon stick
1/2 tsp red pepper flakes (or cayenne to taste)
Large pinch saffron, crumbled
Salt and pepper
4 cups chicken broth, vegetable broth or water
1 cup water
In a large mixing bowl, combine all meatball ingredients and mix well to combine. Shape into meatballs about the size of a walnut or golfball. Set aside on a plate, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least one hour prior to adding them to the sauce. This will help them hold together during the cooking process. While the meatballs are chilling, make the sauce! In a large heavy-bottomed pot or dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until soft and just starting to brown. Add the tomato paste and seasonings. Stir well and allow to brown just slightly. Add broth and scrape up anything stuck to the bottom of the pot and stir to incorporate. Bring to a simmer. Give it a taste to check for salt. Allow to simmer for ten minutes at least before adding the meatballs. Or you can make this sauce ahead of time and put in the fridge. It will keep for a day or so. Allow meatballs to simmer for 20-30 minutes or until tender and cooked through. (they can sit on low for awhile as you make your sides) Serve over rice or couscous! There’s also a serving suggestion for cilantro and scallions, but I’m a hard pass on both, personally. But you do you. Hmm? What’s that? Oh, the asparagus in the picture! Easy peasy. Preheat your oven to 400. Toss a bunch or two of trimmed asparagus in some salt, fresh cracked pepper, and olive oil until coated. Roast for 15-20 minutes. (Should still be bright green and have a little crunch). Works for fresh broccoli or green beans too. 
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amazighbuffy · a year ago
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The only people from Bon Appétit who are allowed to make Harira, possible, one day, if they so chose, would be Andy Baraghani, Brad Leone or Carla Lalli. The others are not allowed because they wouldn’t understand.
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blogcicciosjm · a year ago
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Fidandoci della Lonely Planet, andiamo alla ricerca del ristorante Oumnia... dire che è nascosto è poco!
In un’atmosfera marocchina, degustiamo un vino rosso locale e un piatto speciale: il mechoui, agnello cotto a fuoco lento e farcito con cous cous e uva sultanina.
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blogcicciosjm · a year ago
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Cena fra viaggiatori al ristorante marocchino Chez Hicham. Bellissima serata fra tajines e la ottima compagnia di Cristina e Claudio.
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alexsrandomramblings · 2 years ago
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First time making b'stilla. Sadly the phyllo wasn't as neat on top as I'd like.
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3alamilane-blog · 2 years ago
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MY PIZZA STYLE
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3alamilane-blog · 2 years ago
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teamtravlyng · 2 years ago
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Tea in Morocco
Drinking #tea is a way of life, and a gesture of hospitality and warmth for Moroccans. Served at breakfast, lunch, evening snacks and even after dinner, tea is a very important part of Moroccan life and culture.
The making of Moroccan tea is a skill and art learnt over time. #Chinese gunpowder tea is the most served tea in #Morocco. It’s brewed with sugar and fresh mint. The Southern cities of Morocco take more sugar in their tea than others.
One adds tea leaves with water in the kettle and allowed to boil. The fresh mint and sugar are then added and allowed to steep. Different herbs might be added for their medicinal properties to cure ailments. Berber tea might include ingredients like thyme, lemongrass, sage, verbena, etc.
Poured from a considerable height on to glasses, the tea froths and is judged by how well it froths and bubbles.
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baselerd · 3 years ago
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Pan-fried okra with harissa powder, melted tomatoes, and argan oil. Recipe adapted from Mourad: New Moroccan.
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samiaxx · 3 years ago
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The vibrant city of Marrakesh ❤️
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Moroccan cuisine is influenced by Morocco's interactions and exchanges with other cultures and nations over the centuries.[1] Moroccan cuisine is typically a mix of Mediterranean, Arabic, Andalusian, and most importantly, Berber cuisine with a tiny European and Subsaharian influence.
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