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#newspapers
foxssie · a day ago
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POV: a fox stole your tabloid translation: A fox stole my bag where I had Plus Sedem Dní (Slovak tabloid) and nobody believes me. december 2021
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yesterdaysprint · 8 months ago
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Daily Mountain Eagle, Jasper, Alabama, November 25, 1914
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jarchaeology · 4 months ago
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Article from the Tallahassee Democrat - August 27, 1998
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kitschandretro · a month ago
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“Tune in next week for page two!”
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historical-nonfiction · 11 months ago
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The word "dude" entered English in the 1880s. And like any new slang, people enjoyed making fun of it.
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nycnostalgia · 5 months ago
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Gem Spa, at St Marks and 2nd Avenue, 1981
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probablyasocialecologist · 8 months ago
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Inaccurate stories have long been splashed on the front pages of our country’s newspapers. Examples include the claims that Muslims are forcibly trying to adopt white Christian children, that Muslims are plotting to take over schools in Birmingham, or that ‘84 percent of grooming gangs are made up of Asian men’ – a stat that was debunked by the Home Office itself.
Stories written about the ‘Muslim problem’ or claims that ‘there is not enough Islamophobia in the Tory party’ are part of a consistent pattern where moral panics have been whipped up against the community. Research from the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) in 2018 showed that most coverage of Muslims in the British media has had a negative slant, and is contributing to Islamophobia.
There have been a steady stream of complaints upheld against newspapers for inaccurate reporting against Muslims, often including false accusations of extremism. Gary Jones, editor of the Daily Express, has himself said that the paper helped create Islamophobic sentiment.
To therefore claim that it’s just ‘one or two examples’ or a ‘needle in the haystack’—as Ian Murray, now former executive director of the Society of Editors, did on the BBC when trying to defend the statement—smacks not only of gross ignorance, but of a state of denial.
Then again, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Murray thinks the media is the one institution in the country that doesn’t have a problem with racism. His privilege, embodied in the fact that he works in one of the most socially exclusive professions in the country, in which 80 percent of editors are privately schooled and only 0.2 percent are Black and 0.4 percent are Muslim, insulates him from the consequences of the inaccurate and bigoted reporting which most affects minority communities like my own.
Claims that one in five Muslims support ISIS—just another example of a story that needed correcting, which the Sun itself admitted was misleading—have empowered the likes of Tommy Robinson and Britain First, who led far-right demonstrations in my hometown of Luton. And it’s not only Muslims, of course – Nick Davies’ recent book Flat Earth News detailed how 64% of Black people shown in the Daily Mail were criminals, an appalling statistic which goes some way to evidencing the systemic bias against that community.
For some editors, printing a simple correction in a small box within the paper is the end of the matter – but for many minority communities the impact has been long-lasting. We’re the ones left to pick up the pieces, while others have the privilege of being able to ‘move on’.
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pileofsith · a year ago
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I kinda ship whatever nonsense seemed to always be going on in the pictures of the Edwardian era Illustrated Police News...
...woman in night gown threatens abjectly incompetent burglar... multiple instances of this...
...plucky socialite lady protects fainting detective... dapper dandy marries a literal floating ghost... two brawlers bite each others faces make out on bar room floor...
Truly an Aesthetique, albeit one beyond description or reason.
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nerviovago · 3 months ago
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yesterdaysprint · a year ago
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Douglas Island News, Alaska, November 15, 1918
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uwmspeccoll · 5 months ago
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Fashion Friday: 1920s Fashion
This week we are exploring 1920s American fashion by looking at a scrapbook found in our sibling department the UWM Archives! A young woman named Marguerite Grossenbach kept a scrapbook while she was a student at the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee the early 1920s. The scrapbook is found in the archival collection of the Layton School of Art’s founders Charlotte Partridge and Miriam Frink, Milwaukee Mss 167, Box  74.
The scrapbook includes numerous photographs and clippings from magazines and newspapers. It even includes some original fashion drawings by Marguerite Grossenbach! What is so fun to me about looking through this scrapbook is all the 1920s fashion on display. Including an article about “FLAPPERS: Inspiration for the Modern Age” which has great illustrations of short haircuts and depictions of women participating in the workforce as stenographers and engaging in various leisure activities like dancing, smoking, and dating men. Things that may have been seen as risqué in earlier eras. One of my favorite captions is “the society flapper with her musical stride, her tweedy comfort and her desire to be considered ten degrees more wicked than she is.”
I also included is a poster design that Marguerite pasted into her scrapbook women voting (the 19th Amendment was ratified August 18, 1920, which legally guarantees American women the right to vote). It depicts a woman standing with children and states “Use Your Vote to Protect Their Future. Join Milwaukee County League of Women Voters.” The poster was designed by Alfred Lindermuth, a serviceman who was studying at the Layton School of Art and who won $25 in a poster contest for this design.
Many of the pictures and remembrances in this scrapbook show a carefree attitude that is indicative of changing gender roles in the 1920s.  The Layton School of Art was coeducational which was unusual because many colleges were sex-segregated at the time.
I love seeing all the short hairstyles, cool hats, looser fitting dresses, and oxford shoes that Layton women wore in the 1920s!  
If you want an overview of the 1920s in Western fashion check it out here.
View more posts about the Layton School of Art.
View more Fashion Friday posts.
–Sarah, Special Collections Graduate Intern
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drcalvin · 2 months ago
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Thomas Barrow and newspapers!
Mystery paper
Sporting Life & Sportsman - a specialist paper? a part of some other paper? Idk
Yorkshire Gazette (Described as weekly Conservative publication, it advocated landowning and farming interests and supported the Established Church. by the British Newspaper Archive, regarding when it started in 1899) 
The Daily Mirror
[Modern paper from 2014, image source DA official Instagram]
Andy and Thomas both seem to hold The Times.
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vignellicenter · 16 days ago
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“It may well change the approach to newspaper design in the future.” – Allen Hurlburt in Graphis 156 
Hurlburt was referring to a new New York City weekly newspaper, The Herald, designed by Massimo Vignelli and first published in April 1971. 
Featured here is a single sheet ‘newspaper’ which served as a marketing teaser. Although the paper was short-lived, it was just the first of many newspaper designs by Vignelli.
More from Hurlburt on The Herald:
“Throughout his design career Massimo Vignelli has studied newspapers and has become acutely aware of their problems and their failures; so when the opportunity arrived, he had already formulated many of his ideas.” 
“In discussing the selection of Times New Roman, Massimo Vignelli explained: ‘I decided to avoid the obvious choice of Helvetica and use a typeface with a more journalistic character. I wanted to communicate with the newspaper reader in terms of timeless typography rather than fashionable solutions.”
See more examples of The Herald in the digital archives: https://artsandculture.google.com/search?q=vignelli%20herald #Vignelli 
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thatsbelievable · 10 months ago
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Source: The New York Tattler, October 7, 1911
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weirdlandtv · a year ago
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1972 covers of underground newspaper, International Times.
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