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#modernization
lonestarbattleship · 15 days ago
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USS New Mexico (BB-40) undergoing modernization at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on August 4, 1932.
NHHC: NH 64513
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cartespostalesantiques · 9 months ago
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Maadi station in Cairo, Egypt
Vintage postcard
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This home was posted on Facebook by a very angry neighbor, b/c he is appalled by the renovation. Here, the top picture is the updated façade and the lower photo is the way it used to look. Well, they left the niches, but I would’ve liked a different garage door and less black trim.  
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Here, the upper photo is the original fireplace and floor. The lower photo is the redone living room. Really, I can’t believe they covered up those floors. 
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As you can see in the upper pic, they took away all the inlaid flooring. And, they put glass “railings” on the stairs. Maybe they should’ve just built a new house somewhere else.
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I do love a vintage bath- they can be decorated to look so cute. This is not even recognizable. Well, one FB commenter said, “I unabashedly love the updated version.” Truthfully, I think they ruined a lot of great original features that could’ve been worked into the new design. What say you? 
via Facebook
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lordmomohismomoness · 12 days ago
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ATTENTION anyone who likes pride and prejudice, comedy, catchy songs, and supporting local theater groups!
I have just seen my favorite adaptation on pride and prejudice ever. The local theater group did Prejudice and Pride: a Folk Musical and it was AMAZING!
The show is a genderswapped P&P that takes place in East Tennessee and blends the themes of the novel with relevance to today. If you want to get a ticket to the recording of the show, you can go here:
Some of my favorite lines include:
"Butter my ass and call me a biscuit"
"I now pronounce you, under arrest"
And everything about the songs "Heaven Sent" (aka the thirsty reverend song) and "Bandits in Love"
The virtual show costs $20 and is worth every penny. Plus it all goes toward local artists.
If you are like me and folk music is not your preferred genre, you can check out the soundtrack on spotify here:
It won't be the same without the context of the show, but I don't like folk music and nearly all of these songs have been stuck in my head for a week now, and I ain't mad about it.
So please, lovers of zutara, dramoine, pride and prejudice, and literally any enemies to lovers ship: go support this wonderful show because it deserves so much love
Side note: if you are in Scotland, they are currently performing this show in August at the Edinburgh Fringe Fest, so go see it if you have a chance!
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gregor-samsung · 2 months ago
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“ Kabul (5900 ft., 36 miles from Charikar), June 11th [1934].
From Herat to Kabul we have come 930 miles, of which forty-five were on horseback. A winding hill-road brought us down from the Charikar plateau to a smaller plain inside a ring of mountains; running water and corrugated iron glinted among its trees. At the entrance to the capital the police deprived the Vicar and the Curate of their rifles, to their great distress; but being in turbans, no one would believe they were government servants. We drove to the Foreign Office, where hot-red English ramblers were climbing over iron railings; to the hotel, where there was writing-paper in each bedroom; to the Russian Legation, where they had had no answer to M. Bouriachenko’s telegram; to the German shop, where they refused to sell us hock without a permit from the Minister of Trade; and finally to our Legation, where the Minister, Sir Richard Maconochie, has asked us to stay. It is a white house, dignified with pillars and furnished as it would be at home, without any mosquitonets or fans to remind one of the Orient. Christopher says he finds it peculiar to be in a room whose walls aren’t falling down. Opinion at the Legation agrees on the silliness of refusing the Russian diplomats in Kabul transit visas through India. Even if they go as far towards the frontier as Jelallabad, the Government of India sends in official complaints. The result is a sort of gentlemen’s agreement between the two Legations and the Afghan Government that the English shall not travel in the north of the country and the Russians in the south. That is why the authorities at Mazar could not allow us to the Oxus, though they would not admit such a reason lest it appear a limitation of their sovereignty. We were lucky to have got as close as we did, particularly as it appears that Haji Lai Mohammad, who bought the car, and our chauffeur Jamshyd Taroporevala, spread a tale that we were Secret Service agents engaged in map-making. Next time I do this kind of journey, I shall take lessons in spying beforehand. Since one has to put up with the disadvantages of the profession anyhow, one might as well reap some of its advantages, if there are any. British diplomacy in Kabul just now hangs on the Minister’s roses. At the King’s birthday party, on June 3rd, they were in full flower, and the Afghans, who are all rose-lovers, had never seen such big formal blooms. Next morning, visiting cards from the Minister of Court were fluttering from the finest trees; they had been left by his gardener in the night. Now all the other ministers want cuttings too, and are also in a turmoil over the peonies, which have been promised them for next year. Magnificent as the formal roses are, I yet prefer an Afghan tree which stands by the gate in front. It is fifteen feet high and covered with such a profusion of white blossoms that hardly a leaf is visible. “
Robert Byron, The Road to Oxiana; first published by Macmillan & Co. Ltd, London, 1937.
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curatorsday · a month ago
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Thursday, July 14, 2022
Today, I created a new card to replace the one for lot 22, section YY. The top was completely missing from the old card. The new one is certainly more readable but it’s kind of sad to lose the charm of the handwritten original.
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somethingusefulfromflorida · 8 months ago
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I think people need to come to terms with and accept he fact that the American Constitution is a failed experiment.
It feels like we're not allowed to criticize it lest we be accused of treason and unAmerican activity, like it's a voodoo doll representing the country and any attack on it is an attack on the entire geopolitical/socioeconomic infrastructure set in place over the last 250 years. People who worship the constitution love to shout "America: like it or leave it," until their opponents get into power, and then they bend over backwards to cry "well actually no, you're doing it wrong, it's only supposed to be how WE want it to be," so it's not like they truly think it's infallible. They acknowledge the faults when it suits them, but instead of blaming the document they blame whichever political figure is in their proverbial crosshairs this year. They never address the underlying flaws and the inherent injustices in a political system where human rights simply do not exist until two groups of aristocrats and oligarchs agree to write them down one at a time after jumping through months or years of bureaucratic hoops because one of the groups thinks human rights shouldn't exist at all for anyone who isn't one of them and the other group keeps trying to appease the first group and win their favor with concessions until we wind up with a dysfunctional single-party state with nominal opposition at best, even though a CONSISTENT MAJORITY of the people living under this system oppose it and keep trying to change it (Republicans have lost every presidential election since 1988, except 2004 which occurred right after we were forced into two unwinnable wars by the losing candidate, but somehow they've controlled the government more often than not and have been able to shape our society and culture through force).
We live in an apartheid system where the laws are applied with neither equality or equity, and the problem lies in the fact that we're tying ourselves to an 18th century way of thinking. We need modernization, we need reformation, we need progression. It pisses me off that nobody else is talking about this, at least not seriously. If anyone says "we need to throw out the constitution," they're most likely right-wing nutjobs who want an even more deeply divided apartheid system under an absolute monarch of their choice, while I'm suggesting a National Constitutional Convention to address and fix the problems (one which we have held before in the 1780s, and which many modern countries hold whenever necessary), rather than just throw the whole thing out and let it be a free for all until some strongman convinces enough cops and soldiers and vigilante militiamen to join his cult and cement his power through might. We need to have a serious conversation about the shortcomings of the increasingly politicized and toxically hyperpartisan system of government we have been force to live under. We need to be able to talk about it without being written off as fringe. We need to normalize this conversation until it enters the mainstream discourse; then and only then can we actually work towards a solution rather than just complaining about it. We can only point at the absurdity and injustice of it all for so long while doing absolutely nothing to stop it. We can't just act incredulous, we can't keep pretending to be shocked every time the system fails us in increasingly obvious ways.
We need to shit or get off the pot.
Put up or shut up.
We can see it's not working, so let's stop taking about how much it's not working and let's start actually making it work.
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pleyf · 21 days ago
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Traditional to Modern Society (Process)
Traditional to Modern Society (Process)
The research field of sociology is larger than our mind can take. These three great thinkers, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber are known as founding fathers of sociology. We must first focus on how they define society and what is at the root of change to compare the problems and similarities in the transition from traditional to modern society. Modernization Traditional to Modern Society…
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jasper-rolls · a month ago
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Function:D - ガネメ [Modernization]
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ghostwarriorrrr · 3 months ago
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lonestarbattleship · 8 months ago
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USS Iowa (BB-61) undergoing reactivation and modernization in Pascagoula, Mississippi on December 9, 1983.
NARA: 6381245
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lovesinistra · a year ago
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This is a surprising home- an untouched 1860s structure has been totally modernized by an architect in Melbourne, Australia. 
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Flaking walls were replaced by Spanish tiles.
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It was given a simple & refined interior. I like the sleek fireplace, but not so sure it belongs at the top of the stairs.
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The architect says he reinstated the Victorian era features, but I don’t see a thing that resembles it, except maybe beadboard on the island.
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A glass hall leading from a new addition that replaced a partially-demolished part links the old structure w/the new.
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In the new addition is a modern spiral staircase to a roof deck. But, even though the architect chose to gut and modernize the interior...
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He decided to keep the original façade, b/c it respects the past and embraces the future through preserving and exposing the rich history of the original building, rather than stripping it back and providing all new finishes.
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He wanted to preserve the original patina. 
https://www.designboom.com/architecture/pandolfini-architects-heritage-building-apartments-minimal-australia-06-22-2018/
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heavenlyangeliq · a year ago
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Finland_Svartalfaheimr
Sweden_Niflheim
Norway_Asgard
Estonia_Vanaheim
Denmark_muspelheim
Iceland_Jotuneimr
Lithuania/Latvia_ Alfheim
( figured I’d post this too) it’s based on my last post where I said that I headcanon Loki to have been born in Iceland.
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jrmilazzo · 11 months ago
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<< But while the odd practice of sometimes slipping kids into the mail might be seen as incompetence or negligence on the part of the mail carriers, Lynch sees it more as an example of just how much rural communities relied on and trusted local postal workers.
“Mail carriers were trusted servants, and that goes to prove it,” Lynch says. “There are stories of rural carriers delivering babies and taking [care of the] sick. Even now, they’ll save lives because they’re sometimes the only persons that visit a remote household every day.” >>
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gregor-samsung · 11 months ago
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“ Kabul, June 17th [1934].
We solved a mystery on the way back from Ghazni. Some small trees of the sallow type were growing along a stream near the road, and Seyid Jemal stopped to let his assistant pick a few branches from them, which he threw into the back of the lorry. As they fell at our feet, they gave out that same elusive smell which has pervaded the whole journey since we first met it at the Afghan frontier, and which now, in its overwhelming sweetness, brought the minarets of Herat before my eyes again. It emanated from clusters of small yellow-green flowers, which are unnoticeable from a distance, but which, if ever I smell them again, will remind me of Afghanistan as a cedar wardrobe reminds me of childhood. Seyid Jemal has heard that soon after we crossed it, two lorries were completely wrecked by the stream that delayed us on the Baglan plain, and that the Kunduz ferry has overturned and sunk, drowning five women. We are now staying in the hotel here, which is run by Indians and is not uncivilised; they have just built an annexe and telegraphed for a German chef. Kabul for the most part has an easy unpretentious character, as of a Balkan town in the good sense of the term. It clusters round a few bare rocky hills which rise abruptly from the verdant plain and act as defences. Snow-mountains decorate the distance, the parliament sits in a cornfield, and long avenues shade the town’s approaches. In winter, at a height of 6000 feet, the cold may be inconvenient. But at present the climate is perfect, hot yet always fresh. Cinemas and alcohol are forbidden. The Legation doctor has had to give up treating women at the instance of the Church; though they sometimes visit him disguised as boys. And the whole policy of forcible Westernisation is in abeyance. All the same, Westernisation is progressing by example, and one feels that perhaps the Afghans have struck the mean for which Asia is looking. Even the most nationalist of them makes a pleasant contrast with the mincing assertiveness of the modern Persian. “
Robert Byron, The Road to Oxiana; first published by Macmillan & Co. Ltd, London, 1937.
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harmfulsilvanelfling · a year ago
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Gimli and Legolas' modern chat
Gimli
11:51 Dude, look, there's an ambulance outside your house.
It's not for you??😂
11:53 I asked the guys right now, they say some kid fell out of the window.
12:02 Where are you? Why don't you answer?:)
12:05 HOW THE HELL did you fall out of the window DUDE
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