Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#alcestis
forlornalbatross · 13 days ago
Text
“I understand no more. Thy words are riddles.”
Euripides - Alcestis
262 notes · View notes
enthymesis · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Euripides, from Alcestis; tr. by Richmond Lattimore
﹙Text ID: You touch me deep, my heart, my mind.﹚
3K notes · View notes
smakkabagms · 4 months ago
Text
“Life recovers and carries on. The dead are buried. Losses forgotten.” - Fernando Pessoa, The Book of Disquiet “Time will ease your pain; the dead are nothing.” - Euripides, tr. Emily Wilson, Alcestis
26 notes · View notes
virgilean · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Books Read in 2021: Alcestis by Katherine Beautner
"They would hold us to our promises, keep us in our marriages, the places we were given as girls and must sorrow in as women. And I would miss her in every fruit and every flower, every pain and every poison, every bit of rot."
14 notes · View notes
victorianink · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Favorite Artists: Lord Frederic Leighton, Painting Details
In order as shown (top left to top right, bottom left to bottom right):
Jonathan's Token to David
Icarus and Daedalu
Hercules Wrestling with Death for the Body of Alcestis
Golden Hours
Orpheus and Eurydice
Pan
953 notes · View notes
archiveoftragedies · 5 months ago
Text
A retelling of Alcestis based on the single paragraph I just read on br*tannica:
Admetus: Apollo, bro, I need your help to marry my crush Alcestis
Apollo: whatever you need babe, I love you
Admetus: I need a chariot pulled by a boar and a lion
Apollo: here you are gorgeous
Admetus: neat bro!
*Alcestis and Admetus marry and are deeply in love with each other*
Prophecy: it would be a shame
Apollo: don't you fucking dare
Prophecy: :) :) it would be a shame if Admetus were to die
Apollo: no, you can't do that, Fates tell it it can't do that
The 3 Fates at the same time in an ominous tone: actually it's true, he's gonna unalive
Alcestis: yikes
Fates: unless someone takes his place
*Fates not-so-subtly look at Alcestis*
Alcestis: sure fine I'll die for him
Admetus: babe no
Alcestis: babe yes
*Alcestis dies*
Admetus: :(
Apollo: look what you've done! Now my beautiful fully romantic crush is sad!
Heracles (who's suddenly here for some reason): yikes man, I know what it's like being in love with your master
Everyone: kinky
Heracles: and also with boys. I'm bisexual
Apollo: I'm bisexual!
*they fistbump, historians promptly look away*
Heracles: let me just try something, man
*they go to Alcestis' grave, her ghost is sitting there. Admetus cries*
Thanatos: hey Apollo and son of Zeus number who's keeping count, was just taking the lady here to Hades
Heracles: no you're not
Thanatos: and what are you gonna do? Fight me?
*Heracles fistfights Death*
*Heracles wins?? Somehow??*
Alcestis: holy shit I'm alive
Apollo: yes! I did it! *he goes to kiss Admetus but he's currently busy making out with Alcestis* oh sure, ok, you do that
Heracles: I'll go complete my works now and be with my boyfriend which I have because I'm bi!
Apollo: I guess I'll see if some other of my male or female crushes is available because I'm bi
*historians pretend they do not see*
🌈The end🌈
16 notes · View notes
honeysweethelen · 4 months ago
Text
APOLLO. So you will not grant this grace?
DEATH. I will not. You know who I am.
APOLLO. Yes - one hostile to men and by the gods abominated.
DEATH. You can't have everything. You can't just break the law.
- Alkestis, Euripides (trans. Anne Carson)
7 notes · View notes
quotes6475 · 7 days ago
Quote
When a good man is hurt, all who would be called good must suffer with him.
Euripides, Alcestis
2 notes · View notes
ochoislas · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
ALCESTIS
Mujer que, por amor de amarse indigno, el beso saludable de la muerte conociste, rampando entre almas lívidas
tal niebla que resbala sin aliento, y a quien, ya vistos los jueces, divino denuedo —contra ley natural— cuesta
un ingrato retorno a vida mísera: pues si purgar no logró el primer trance la dureza del hombre... ¿qué migajas tocarían a quien vuelve importuna?
Señora, a usted morir le gusta, creo, pues quien tropieza una... más quien dos se encama con la muerte, cogió vicio: con plumas de carroza la encorocen.
*
ALCESTIS
You who have known the wholesome kiss of Death because of a love not worthy to be loved, who have crept among the stealthy blue-mouthed ghosts
gliding mistlike with no propulsive breath, who have gazed into the judge's face and moved the laws of nature, whom a god's strength cost
unenviable resumption of a life that could be little thence, having not been purgative to man's selfishness, what thin husks shall be fed to a resurrected wife?
Lady, you like to die, I take it, but who falls once may be innocent; who twice go to Death's bedroom has condoned the vice by habit and should wear hearse-plumes on her scut.
Carlyle Ferren MacIntyre
di-versión©ochoislas
3 notes · View notes
forlornalbatross · 13 days ago
Text
“One who is about to die is really dead already and being so, exist no longer”
Euripides - Alcestis
222 notes · View notes
enthymesis · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Euripides, from Alcestis; tr. by Richmond Lattimore
﹙ Text ID: She alone is a goddess without altar or statue to pray before. She heeds no sacrifice. ﹚
345 notes · View notes
susannaius · 7 months ago
Text
Random midnight thought: Shakespeare knew Alcestis.
In Euripid’s play, Alcestis sacrifices herself to save her husband from death. Death takes her away, but Hercules fights him and brings her back. The climax of the play is when Hercules comes back to the palace of Admetus with a veiled lady, asking him to take care of here while he is away on his journeys. Admetus agrees reluctantly, but when the veil is lifted, it turns out it is Alcestis, who is not dead after all, and happy end.
At the end of Much Ado about Nothing, Claudio’s punishment is that he must marry the veiled lady who is brought to him. When the veil is lifted, it turns out it is Hero, who is not dead after all, and happy end.
Thank you for coming to my TED talk.
2 notes · View notes
Photo
Tumblr media
Jane Ellen Harrison as Euripides’ Alcestis
3 notes · View notes
elleestcommelalune1 · a year ago
Text
But why does she not speak?
—EURIPIDES, Alcestis
7 notes · View notes
Quote
There be many shapes of mystery. And many things God makes to be, Past hope or fear. And the end men looked for cometh not, And a path is there where no man thought. So hath it fallen here.
Alcestis by Euripides
7 notes · View notes
art-nyc · 7 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Euripides, along was Sophocles and Aeschylus, is responsible for the great rise of Greek tragedy. It was in the 5th Century BC, during the height of Greece's cultural bloom, that Euripides lived and worked. Of his roughly ninety-two plays, only seventeen tragedies survive. Both ridiculed and lauded during his life, Euripides now stands as an innovator of the Greek drama. His play "Alcestis" was awarded second place upon its debut in 438 at the Festival Dionysia, the litmus test and judging grounds for Greek tragedy of the day. "Alcestis", the oldest of his extant plays, examines love, death, and marriage. The play follows Apollo, Admetus, and Heracles as they struggle to save Admetus' beloved wife Princess Alcestis from thanatos (death) in Hades. The play is now considered a problem play due to its difficult categorization between tragedy and comedy. "Alcestis" continues to stir debate and discussion and remains one of Euripides most fascinating works.
THE ALCESTIS OF EURIPIDES
INTRODUCTION The Alcestis would hardly confirm its author's right to be acclaimed "the most tragic of the poets." It is doubtful whether one can call it a tragedy at all. Yet it remains one of the most characteristic and delightful of Euripidean dramas, as well as, by modern standards, the most easily actable. And I notice that many judges who display nothing but a fierce satisfaction in sending other plays of that author to the block or the treadmill, show a certain human weakness in sentencing the gentle daughter of Pelias. The play has been interpreted in many different ways. There is the old unsophisticated view, well set forth in Paley's preface of 1872. He regards the Alcestis simply as a triumph of pathos, especially of "that peculiar sort of pathos which comes most home to us, with our views and partialities for domestic life…. As for the characters, that of Alcestis must be acknowledged to be pre-eminently beautiful. One could almost imagine that Euripides had not yet conceived that bad opinion of the sex which so many of the subsequent dramas exhibit…. But the rest are hardly well-drawn, or, at least, pleasingly portrayed." "The poet might perhaps, had he pleased, have exhibited Admetus in a more amiable point of view." This criticism is not very trenchant, but its weakness is due, I think, more to timidity of statement than to lack of perception. Paley does see that a character may be "well-drawn" without necessarily being "pleasing"; and even that he may be eminently pleasing as a part of the play while very displeasing in himself. He sees that Euripides may have had his own reasons for not making Admetus an ideal husband. It seems odd that such points should need mentioning; but Greek drama has always suffered from a school of critics who approach a play with a greater equipment of aesthetic theory than of dramatic perception. This is the characteristic defect of classicism. One mark of the school is to demand from dramatists heroes and heroines which shall satisfy its own ideals; and, though there was in the New Comedy a mask known to Pollux as "The Entirely-good Young Man" ([Greek: panchraestos neaniskos]), such a character is fortunately unknown to classical Greek drama. The influence of this "classicist" tradition has led to a timid and unsatisfying treatment of the Alcestis, in which many of the most striking and unconventional features of the whole composition were either ignored or smoothed away. As a natural result, various lively-minded readers proceeded to overemphasize these particular features, and were carried into eccentricity or paradox. Alfred Schöne, for instance, fixing his attention on just those points which the conventional critic passed over, decides simply that the Alcestis is a parody, and finds it very funny. (Die Alkestis von Euripides, Kiel, 1895.) I will not dwell on other criticisms of this type. There are those who have taken the play for a criticism of contemporary politics or the current law of inheritance. Above all there is the late Dr. Verrall's famous essay in Euripides the Rationalist, explaining it as a psychological criticism of a supposed Delphic miracle, and arguing that Alcestis in the play does not rise from the dead at all. She had never really died; she only had a sort of nervous catalepsy induced by all the "suggestion" of death by which she was surrounded. Now Dr. Verrall's work, as always, stands apart. Even if wrong, it has its own excellence, its special insight and its extraordinary awakening power. But in general the effect of reading many criticisms on the Alcestis is to make a scholar realize that, for all the seeming simplicity of the play, competent Grecians have been strangely bewildered by it, and that after all there is no great reason to suppose that he himself is more sensible than his neighbours. This is depressing. None the less I cannot really believe that, if we make patient use of our available knowledge, the Alcestis presents any startling enigma. In the first place, it has long been known from the remnants of the ancient Didascalia, or official notice of production, that the Alcestis was produced as the fourth play of a series; that is, it took the place of a Satyr-play. It is what we may call Pro-satyric. (See the present writer's introduction to the Rhesus.) And we should note for what it is worth the observation in the ancient Greek argument: "The play is somewhat satyr-like ([Greek: saturiphkoteron]). It ends in rejoicing and gladness against the tragic convention." Now we are of late years beginning to understand much better what a Satyr-play was. Satyrs have, of course, nothing to do with satire, either etymologically or otherwise. Satyrs are the attendant daemons who form the Kômos, or revel rout, of Dionysus. They are represented in divers fantastic forms, the human or divine being mixed with that of some animal, especially the horse or wild goat. Like Dionysus himself, they are connected in ancient religion with the Renewal of the Earth in spring and the resurrection of the dead, a point which students of the Alcestis may well remember. But in general they represent mere joyous creatures of nature, unthwarted by law and unchecked by self-control. Two notes are especially struck by them: the passions and the absurdity of half-drunken revellers, and the joy and mystery of the wild things in the forest. The rule was that after three tragedies proper there came a play, still in tragic diction, with a traditional saga plot and heroic characters, in which the Chorus was formed by these Satyrs. There was a deliberate clash, an effect of burlesque; but of course the clash must not be too brutal. Certain characters of the heroic saga are, so to speak, at home with Satyrs and others are not. To take our extant specimens of Satyr-plays, for instance: in the Cyclops we have Odysseus, the heroic trickster; in the fragmentary Ichneutae of Sophocles we have the Nymph Cyllene, hiding the baby Hermes from the chorus by the most barefaced and pleasant lying; later no doubt there was an entrance of the infant thief himself. Autolycus, Sisyphus, Thersites are all Satyr-play heroes and congenial to the Satyr atmosphere; but the most congenial of all, the one hero who existed always in an atmosphere of Satyrs and the Kômos until Euripides made him the central figure of a tragedy, was Heracles. [Footnote: The character of Heracles in connexion with the Kômos, already indicated by Wilamowitz and Dieterich (Herakles, pp. 98, ff.; Pulcinella, pp. 63, ff.), has been illuminatingly developed in an unpublished monograph by Mr. J.A.K. Thomson, of Aberdeen.] The complete Satyr-play had a hero of this type and a Chorus of Satyrs. But the complete type was refined away during the fifth century; and one stage in the process produced a play with a normal chorus but with one figure of the Satyric or "revelling" type. One might almost say the "comic" type if, for the moment, we may remember that that word is directly derived from 'Kômos.' The Alcestis is a very clear instance of this Pro-satyric class of play. It has the regular tragic diction, marked here and there (393, 756, 780, etc.) by slight extravagances and forms of words which are sometimes epic and sometimes over-colloquial; it has a regular saga plot, which had already been treated by the old poet Phrynichus in his Alcestis, a play which is now lost but seems to have been Satyric; and it has one character straight from the Satyr world, the heroic reveller, Heracles. It is all in keeping that he should arrive tired, should feast and drink and sing; should be suddenly sobered and should go forth to battle with Death. It is also in keeping that the contest should have a half-grotesque and half-ghastly touch, the grapple amid the graves and the cracking ribs. * * * * * So much for the traditional form. As for the subject, Euripides received it from Phrynichus, and doubtless from other sources. We cannot be sure of the exact form of the story in Phrynichus. But apparently it told how Admetus, King of Pherae in Thessaly, received from Apollo a special privilege which the God had obtained, in true Satyric style, by making the Three Fates drunk and cajoling them. This was that, when his appointed time for death came, he might escape if he could find some volunteer to die for him. His father and mother, from whom the service might have been expected, refused to perform it. His wife, Alcestis, though no blood relation, handsomely undertook it and died. But it so happened that Admetus had entertained in his house the demi-god, Heracles; and when Heracles heard what had happened, he went out and wrestled with Death, conquered him, and brought Alcestis home. Given this form and this story, the next question is: What did Euripides make of them? The general answer is clear: he has applied his usual method. He accepts the story as given in the tradition, and then represents it in his own way. When the tradition in question is really heroic, we know what his way is. He preserves, and even emphasizes, the stateliness and formality of the Attic stage conventions; but, in the meantime, he has subjected the story and its characters to a keener study and a more sensitive psychological judgment than the simple things were originally meant to bear. So that many characters which passed as heroic, or at least presentable, in the kindly remoteness of legend, reveal some strange weakness when brought suddenly into the light. When the tradition is Satyric, as here, the same process produces almost an opposite effect. It is somewhat as though the main plot of a gross and jolly farce were pondered over and made more true to human character till it emerged as a refined and rather pathetic comedy. The making drunk of the Three Grey Sisters disappears; one can only just see the trace of its having once been present. The revelling of Heracles is touched in with the lightest of hands; it is little more than symbolic. And all the figures in the story, instead of being left broadly comic or having their psychology neglected, are treated delicately, sympathetically, with just that faint touch of satire, or at least of amusement, which is almost inseparable from a close interest in character. What was Admetus really like, this gallant prince who had won the affection of such great guests as Apollo and Heracles, and yet went round asking other people to die for him; who, in particular, accepted his wife's monstrous sacrifice with satisfaction and gratitude? The play portrays him well. Generous, innocent, artistic, affectionate, eloquent, impulsive, a good deal spoilt, unconsciously insincere, and no doubt fundamentally selfish, he hates the thought of dying and he hates losing his wife almost as much. Why need she die? Why could it not have been some one less important to him? He feels with emotion what a beautiful act it would have been for his old father. "My boy, you have a long and happy life before you, and for me the sands are well-nigh run out. Do not seek to dissuade me. I will die for you." Admetus could compose the speech for him. A touching scene, a noble farewell, and all the dreadful trouble solved—so conveniently solved! And the miserable self-blinded old man could not see it! Euripides seems to have taken positive pleasure in Admetus, much as Meredith did in his famous Egoist; but Euripides all through is kinder to his victim than Meredith is. True, Admetus is put to obvious shame, publicly and helplessly. The Chorus make discreet comments upon him. The Handmaid is outspoken about him. One feels that Alcestis herself, for all her tender kindness, has seen through him. Finally, to make things quite clear, his old father fights him openly, tells him home-truth upon home-truth, tears away all his protective screens, and leaves him with his self-respect in tatters. It is a fearful ordeal for Admetus, and, after his first fury, he takes it well. He comes back from his wife's burial a changed man. He says not much, but enough. "I have done wrong. I have only now learnt my lesson. I imagined I could save my happy life by forfeiting my honour; and the result is that I have lost both." I think that a careful reading of the play will show an almost continuous process of self-discovery and self-judgment in the mind of Admetus. He was a man who blinded himself with words and beautiful sentiments; but he was not thick-skinned or thick-witted. He was not a brute or a cynic. And I think he did learn his lesson … not completely and for ever, but as well as most of us learn such lessons. The beauty of Alcestis is quite untouched by the dramatist's keener analysis. The strong light only increases its effect. Yet she is not by any means a mere blameless ideal heroine; and the character which Euripides gives her makes an admirable foil to that of Admetus. Where he is passionate and romantic, she is simple and homely. While he is still refusing to admit the facts and beseeching her not to "desert" him, she in a gentle but businesslike way makes him promise to take care of the children and, above all things, not to marry again. She could not possibly trust Admetus's choice. She is sure that the step-mother would be unkind to the children. She might be a horror and beat them (l. 307). And when Admetus has made a thrilling answer about eternal sorrow, and the silencing of lyre and lute, and the statue who shall be his only bride, Alcestis earnestly calls the attention of witnesses to the fact that he has sworn not to marry again. She is not an artist like Admetus. There is poetry in her, because poetry comes unconsciously out of deep feeling, but there is no artistic eloquence. Her love, too, is quite different from his. To him, his love for his wife and children is a beautiful thing, a subject to speak and sing about as well as an emotion to feel. But her love is hardly conscious. She does not talk about it at all. She is merely wrapped up in the welfare of certain people, first her husband and then he children. To a modern romantic reader her insistence that her husband shall not marry again seems hardly delicate. But she does not think about romance or delicacy. To her any neglect to ensure due protection for the children would be as unnatural as to refuse to die for her husband. Indeed, Professor J.L. Myres has suggested that care for the children's future is the guiding motive of her whole conduct. There was first the danger of their being left fatherless, a dire calamity in the heroic age. She could meet that danger by dying herself. Then followed the danger of a stepmother. She meets that by making Admetus swear never to marry. In the long run, I fancy, the effect of gracious loveliness which Alcestis certainly makes is not so much due to any words of her own as to what the Handmaid and the Serving Man say about her. In the final scene she is silent; necessarily and rightly silent, for all tradition knows that those new-risen from the dead must not speak. It will need a long rite de passage before she can freely commune with this world again. It is a strange and daring scene between the three of them; the humbled and broken-hearted husband; the triumphant Heracles, kindly and wise, yet still touched by the mocking and blustrous atmosphere from which he sprang; and the silent woman who has seen the other side of the grave. It was always her way to know things but not to speak of them. The other characters fall easily into their niches. We have only to remember the old Satyric tradition and to look at them in the light of their historical development. Heracles indeed, half-way on his road from the roaring reveller of the Satyr-play to the suffering and erring deliverer of tragedy, is a little foreign to our notions, but quite intelligible and strangely attractive. The same historical method seems to me to solve most of the difficulties which have been felt about Admetus's hospitality. Heracles arrives at the castle just at the moment when Alcestis is lying dead in her room; Admetus conceals the death from him and insists on his coming in and enjoying himself. What are we to think of this behaviour? Is it magnificent hospitality, or is it gross want of tact? The answer, I think, is indicated above. In the uncritical and boisterous atmosphere of the Satyr-play it was natural hospitality, not especially laudable or surprising. From the analogy of similar stories I suspect that Admetus originally did not know his guest, and received not so much the reward of exceptional virtue as the blessing naturally due to those who entertain angels unawares. If we insist on asking whether Euripides himself, in real life or in a play of his own free invention, would have considered Admetus's conduct to Heracles entirely praiseworthy, the answer will certainly be No, but it will have little bearing on the play. In the Alcestis, as it stands, the famous act of hospitality is a datum of the story. Its claims are admitted on the strength of the tradition. It was the act for which Admetus was specially and marvellously rewarded; therefore, obviously, it was an act of exceptional merit and piety. Yet the admission is made with a smile, and more than one suggestion is allowed to float across the scene that in real life such conduct would be hardly wise. Heracles, who rose to tragic rank from a very homely cycle of myth, was apt to bring other homely characters with him. He was a great killer not only of malefactors but of "kêres" or bogeys, such as "Old Age" and "Ague" and the sort of "Death" that we find in this play. Thanatos is not a god, not at all a King of Terrors. One may compare him with the dancing skeleton who is called Death in mediaeval writings. When such a figure appears on the tragic stage one asks at once what relation he bears to Hades, the great Olympian king of the unseen. The answer is obvious. Thanatos is the servant of Hades, a "priest" or sacrificer, who is sent to fetch the appointed victims. The other characters speak for themselves. Certainly Pheres can be trusted to do so, though we must remember that we see him at an unfortunate moment. The aged monarch is not at his best, except perhaps in mere fighting power. I doubt if he was really as cynical as he here professes to be.
* * * * * In the above criticisms I feel that I may have done what critics are so apt to do. I have dwelt on questions of intellectual interest and perhaps thereby diverted attention from that quality in the play which is the most important as well as by far the hardest to convey; I mean the sheer beauty and delightfulness of the writing. It is the earliest dated play of Euripides which has come down to us. True, he was over forty when he produced it, but it is noticeably different from the works of his old age. The numbers are smoother, the thought less deeply scarred, the language more charming and less passionate. If it be true that poetry is bred out of joy and sorrow, one feels as if more enjoyment and less suffering had gone to the making of the Alcestis than to that of the later plays.
ALCESTIS CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY ADMÊTUS, King of Pherae in Thessaly. ALCESTIS, daughter of Pelias, his wife. PHERÊS, his father, formerly King but now in retirement. TWO CHILDREN, his son and daughter. A MANSERVANT in his house. A HANDMAID. The Hero HERACLES. The God APOLLO. THANÁTOS or DEATH. CHORUS, consisting of Elders of Pherae. "The play was first performed when Glaukînos was Archon, in the 2nd year of the 85th Olympiad (438 B.C.). Sophocles was first, Euripides second with the Cretan Women, Alcmaeon in Psophis, Telephus and Alcestis…. The play is somewhat Satyric in character."
ALCESTIS The scene represents the historical Castle of ADMETUS near Pherae in Thessaly. It is the dusk earlier than sunrise; APOLLO, radiant within the darkness, appears on the Castle. APOLLO.
Editorial Reviews 
From Library Journal This new verse translation and adaptation of Euripides' earliest surviving classic, Alcestis (438 B.C.E.), was British Poet Laureate Hughes's last translation before his death in 1998. Ironically, the character Death plays a prominent part in the drama. In order to let her husband, King Admetos, live, queen Alcestis gives up her young life in a bargain arranged by Apollo with Death. The tragic outcome is thwarted when Heracles visits the palace without knowing of Alcestis's death. After learning of Admetos's bereavement, Heracles, in gratitude, decides to rescue Alcestis from Death in a wrestling match. His success reunites the royal couple. Richard Aldington's earlier prose translation (1930), in four acts with short scenes, contains detailed stage directions; this new adaptation is easier to read. Hughes's poetic style is full of beauty and pathos. Highly recommended for both public and academic libraries. -Ming-ming Shen Kuo, Ball State Univ. Lib., Muncie, IN Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition. From Booklist The drama developed out of religious ritual, and many early dramatic masterpieces feature gods and their doings, none more than Euripides' plays, among which Alcestis is a rarity, a tragedy reversed. It begins in tears. Good King Admetos loses Queen Alcestis because she agreed to die in his stead. Even Admetos' patron deity Apollo cannot thwart that force greater than gods, Death. But the demigod Heracles, whom Admetos hosts despite his grief, can and, once he learns who has died, does by wrestling Death until it surrenders Alcestis. With typical Euripidean irony, a superman triumphs where a god fails. The late British poet laureate Ted Hughes adapted the Greek original substantially, greatly expanding Heracles' drunken boasting about his labors, in particular, to point up humanity's heroic capacities and wrench the play's mood from mourning to celebration. He created a richly stageworthy new version that, as a work about a man whose wife dies by a man whose wife (U.S. poet Sylvia Plath) famously died, also provokes biocritical speculation. What is Hughes saying through Alcestis? Ray Olson --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.
You seriously haven’t read Alcestis? Honey, before you marry him, read it, and ask yourself some hard questions. It’ll take you an hour now. Might save you quite a bit of grief later
Jim Kornell  I read Carson's translation, then Hughes. In Carson, the man was unworthy of the woman, a little of a buffoon, spoiled and self-centered. In Hughes, he was pinioned by the gods exactly between intense love and inescapable duty, a tragic hero. Different translator choices, different tastes.
Jeffrey Barcham Ted Hughes'translation of Alcestis continues on a path he pursued for most of his later years: to resurrect "classic" poetry in a modern form. The translation flows eloquently, with the typical Hughes clipped verse. He seems desparate to make the text "speak" to modern readers, and (I think) especially to modern poets.
Despite the obvious (and poignant) parallels of the storyline to Hughes' own life, I did not find his translation of Alcestis as arresting as his Oresteia trilogy (especially the moving "Agamemnon"). The main characters in Alcestis all come across as somewhat cold, and there is a distance between the major themes (sacrifice, renunciation, regret) and the language used. The famous (but somewhat enlarged in Hughes' version) sequence of a drunken Heracles seems discordant given the sparce tone of the rest of the translation.
A fine (and uniquely personal) version, but one to be read along with older, more full treatments.
The description says this is "Translated Into English Rhyming Verse With Explanatory Notes By Gilbert Murray", but it is in fact the prose translation of Theodore Alois Buckley.
1 note · View note
theancientwayoflife · 2 years ago
Text
Tumblr media
~ Alcestis and Admetus.
Date: A.D. 50—79
Place of origin: Pompeii, VI. 8. 5, Casa del Poeta Tragico or House of the Tragic Poet (Found 22nd January 1825 in the tablinum); Naples, National Archaeological Museum, Hall LXXIII; (Napoli, Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli, Sala LXXIII)
155 notes · View notes
deleted1090397 · a year ago
Note
Hiii! May I request you for a reading from your new deck of goddess and heroine? I'm H, a pisces sun. Thankyou lovely reader 😘
You’re welcome! ✨💕
Tumblr media
The message I got for you is devotion from Alcestis.
She wants to let you know that love and devotion also comes with sacrifice, even if that sacrifice is simply compromising with someone out of respect to both be at peace. In the booklet it says, “ While you may give too much of yourself, the mythic narrative reminds us that noble acts are supported by heroic parts of ourselves. We give something of ourselves in order to transform our current situation and relationship”. 🖤
She wants you to realize that you are still whole even if you give away or let aspects, or parts of yourself die off in order to love someone. Sometimes certain parts of yourself aren’t needed anymore when your life is transforming (such as our ego and partying, social media, petty things that don’t truly matter). This doesn’t mean to break down the true deepest parts of yourself just to make someone else comfortable, but to compromise and sacrifice things you can comfortably let go of in order to grow and mend with another person. Love so deeply that you let go of your ego. 🤍
4 notes · View notes