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#folklore
luciasatalina · 2 days ago
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Malchance
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prokopetz · a day ago
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Everybody tends to focus on the “neither by man nor by woman” part of those complicated prophecies – yes, get the jokes about nonbinary dragon-slayers out of your system! – but in practice, that’s typically only one of several clauses which all need to be satisfied.
Other frequent stipulations of such prophecies may include “neither indoors nor outdoors”, “neither during the day nor during the night”, “neither alone nor in company”, “neither by human nor by beast”, “neither while naked nor while clothed”, and so forth.
It’s the last one I’d like to consider today.
Specifically: fursuits.
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dottjupiter · 23 hours ago
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Dr Taylor Swift
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tsyloricons · a day ago
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rowanwitch · 2 days ago
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Bluebells in my local graveyard
Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), also known as witches’ thimbles, lady’s nightcap, fairy flowers, and granfer griggles, start appearing in England around April and May. In some folktales they are strongly associated with fairies. Some say bluebells are made by the fae, and sometimes they are a trap: if you pick one a fairy will come and kidnap you and take you to the nether world! It’s also said that fairies hang their spells on bluebells, and damaging one will break the spell and bring the wrath of the fairy that cast it. In floriology, bluebells symbolise humility, constancy, gratitude and love.
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laurasimonsdaughter · 2 days ago
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A supernatural wife never stays…
I’m always extra fascinated by folklore tropes that show up in a wide variety of cultures, so let’s look at another one: the supernatural/inhuman wife. These are usually stories about a man winning himself a wife that is decidedly not human, either through trickery or courtship. But it never lasts, because these stories all seem to have the same ending, the wife leaves:
Almost all selkie stories, both from Celtic and Nordic tradition, are an example of this. A man steals a selkie’s pelt and thereby binds him to her or leaves her stranded on land and in her desperation persuades her to come back with him and become his wife. After many years and many children she always finds her pelt, however, and as soon as she does she runs off to the sea. In most cases it turns out she has a husband and children in the sea too. In most she keeps leaving presents for her children and in some she still feels affection for her human husband, but she never goes back ashore. There are similar tales about swan-maidens.
An Aboriginal story from the Guugu Yimithirr-speaking people called “The forest spirit and his ten beautiful daughters” tells how the great hunter and warrior Gabul, the Carpet Snake, goes to the mountaintop where the powerful Forest Spirit, lives. He bests him in an unarmed fight, demanding to marry one of his daughters as reward before he will let him go. He takes the most beautiful of the ten daughters home to be his wife but starts worrying when she does not eat or drink. Eventually he takes her to the river and there she promptly turns into a fish and swims upstream back to her father’s mountain, leaving Gabul ashamed and broken-hearted.
There are also stories about fairy wives, most notably two from Wales. One, collected as “The Shepherd of Myddvai”, has a shepherd courts a beautiful maiden that dwells in a lake by bringing her bread. She agrees to go with him if he promises not to strike her three times without cause. Of course he promises this, but he taps her once for dallying to spur her into action, once in confusion when she weeps at a happy wedding, and once in disapproval when she laughs at a sober funeral. She declares their marriage ended and flees back to her lake, only returning once her sons are grown to give them gifts of healing. In the similar tale “Touched by Iron” a farmer’s son falls in love with a fairy maiden and the promise he must make her father is to never touch her with iron. One day as he helps his wife off her horse, she is touched on the knee by the stirrup of the saddle and vanishes. But with her mother’s help she does get to visit him sometimes afterwards, by standing on a large floating turf on a lake, so it could not be said she had set foot on human earth.
In a Chinese story called “The Painter”, from the 9th century bundle Wenqi lu, a learned man buys a screen with a painting of an inhumanly beautiful woman on it. The painter tells him of a ritual that might bring the woman to life and the man manages to call her to him. She steps out of the painting and consents to stay with him, they even have a son together. When the child is two years old, however, the man speaks with a friend of his, who immediately suspects the woman of being a dangerous creature and gives him a celestial weapon to kill her. As soon as he arrives home, his companion sobs that she is a mountain spirit who never asked to be painted by the painter and never asked to be called by him. She steps back into the painting, taking her child with her, leaving the man alone with a beautifully painted screen that now shows both her and the little boy.
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ancaxbre · 2 days ago
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Hero in Romanian folk tales: *casually breaks the laws of physics*
The narrative’s only comment: They were năsdrăvan.
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inejqhafa · 2 days ago
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Our love lasts so long. (insp)
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goblinville · 23 hours ago
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Woolly Bear Caterpillar
The days are getting shorter and the nights are cold. Winter is almost here. In North America, where winters can be extremely harsh, it used to be very important that people prepare food and supplies to last them until spring. But before the advent of weather prediction technology how would one predict the winter’s severity? Luckily there is a little insect that, at least according to folklore, can tell you just what to expect.
The woolly bear caterpillar is the larval form of the Isabella tiger moth (Pyrrharctia isabella), a species that is distributed across much of North America. These caterpillars have three main bands of dense colored hairs along their bodies, two black bands on either end and a central brown band (image of moth and larva below). According to the folklore, the size of the brown band can be used as a predictor of the upcoming winter. If the band is large and there is relatively little black hair, then the winter will be mild. However, if there is more black hair than brown, then the winter will be severe.
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Isabella tiger moth (Source)
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A woolly bear caterpillar (Source)
Scientists have not found any evidence to support this myth but that hasn’t stopped this little insect from capturing people’s hearts and imaginations. In fact, this species and its folklore is so well known and beloved that there are festivals held in its honor in several cities along the Northeast United States. At these festivals they make predictions for the upcoming winter, hold woolly bear races, and sometimes even have parades.
If you want to learn more about this species or the festivals held in its honor I will leave some source below!
Sources:
1, 2, 3, 4
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stained-glass-cat · 22 hours ago
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Seven - Taylor Swift
Photography by Sami Drasin
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taylor-is-gorgeous · a day ago
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@taylor-is-gorgeous
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ya-ka-sha · 2 days ago
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Ceramic plate. Havrylo and Yavdokha Poshyvailo from Opishnia (Ivan Honchar Museum).
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ivycrownedwitch · a day ago
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There was a certain darkness associated with ivy quite possibly because of her associations with death, graveyards and ruins. In Cornwall if you wanted to dream of the Devil, you would pin four ivy leaves to the corners of your pillow. In early American folklore, ivy was unlucky to give as a gift in Maine and Massachusetts because it could bring death to a family. A Somerset belief was that to pick an ivy leaf off a church wall, one would develop sickness. To fall asleep under a large ivy vine climbing tree was told to bring death to the one in slumber. Ivy's black berries were sometimes used in cursing rituals in the British Isles. It is no surprise that ivy is ruled by Saturn, according to astrologers of old. Ivy was a burial plant due to its evergreen nature and was associated with immortality.
Under the Bramble Arch by Corinne Boyer
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thisisgracetrying · a day ago
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New York is so lucky 🥹💕🗽
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rowanwitch · 2 days ago
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Here in the very north of Northumberland, England, there are tales of the Duergar or the Brownmen. One of the areas they're said to inhabit is Simonside pictured here (photograph from Forestry England), and also in Elsdon, a little further to the west. They are said to be the guardians of wild animals.
One such tale was told to Sir Walter Scott by Robert Suretees and is thought to have taken place in the 1640s during the English Civil War. Two hunters came from the city of Newcastle upon Tyne to kill game, and one of them, as he went to refresh himself in a stream, found himself face to face with the Brown Man. He knew immediately he was in the presence of the Lord of the Moors and feared him, immediately offering him some of the game he had killed. The Brown Man encouraged him to jump across the burn, but the young man's friend stopped him, explaining that the water was the only thing protecting him at that point. The Brown Man disappeared, and the young man killed one final grouse.
On killing the poor bird, the hunter felt a sharp pain in his side. The pain worsened as they retired to the local pub that evening, and despite the attention of several doctors over the coming months, the hunter died. The moral of the story is, of course, never kill the wild animals under the care of the Brown Men of the Muirs.
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bobemajses · 2 days ago
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Berl Broder and Yiddish theater
Berl Broder (1815 - 1868) is one of the oldest creators of Yiddish poetry and song and one of the first Galician folk poets. In his songs, which he improvised in pubs and inns while on the road as a hard-drinking bristle dealer, he addresses the suffering of the simple, always disadvantaged Jewish people and thus became a singer of the oppressed and unnoticed.
Broder demonstrated the power of Yiddish to render individual, mundane experience. Typically, the speaker in each song — be it the shepherd all alone with his flock night and day, the shingler on his precarious perch, or “Berl Broder” himself — is a lone and lonely toiler. Within this closed circle of personal sorrow, the folksinger tells each story in the language and with the realia peculiar to his work. There are also works that deal with different motifs of a general character (society and politics), or sing of family life or nature.
Broder successfully crossed Galicia, Russia and Romania with other singers and jokers who soon joined him and who were called the "Broder singers". The group marked the beginning of Yiddish theater.
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rosielleny · 16 hours ago
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Who else processes bad experiences by turning them into fairytales a few years down the line? I was unwell a couple of years ago with symptoms that made me feel like feathers were bursting out of my skin, and the more I plucked out the more grew back. So I got better and wrote a wee story about it full of folklore elements and made-up mythology, which is what this painting is of. Had a lot of fun making it and layering in all the symbolism from the story.
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kald-dal-art · a day ago
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well it's the 17th of May again so did a redraw of this piece i did last year (X)
My two favorite Norwegian/Scandinavian fairytale creatures, the Huldra and Nøkken
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prokopetz · 24 days ago
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The author’s biography doesn’t always tell you anything terribly significant about a literary work, but when I think about the fact that Sir Thomas Malory, the compiler of the most well known English-language literary interpretation of the Arthurian myth cycle, was a double-dealing knight who fought on both sides of the War of the Roses, was repeatedly charged with horse thievery, escaped from prison or skipped bail at least five times, and evidently made himself so obnoxious to those in power that he was specifically excluded by name from a general pardon of prisoners on two separate occasions – an accomplishment in which he is, to the best of my knowledge, unequalled – well, that tends to suggest a certain interpretive lens, is what I mean to say.
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mckeaning · a month ago
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are there still beautiful things?
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