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moonshinestudies · 2 days ago
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24.11.2021
“Nights and days and days and nights, hundreds of them seem to be slipping through my fingers.” -Jean Rhys
Discovering my love for chai lattes, walking on cobblestone paths and getting ready for exam season.
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icannotstudy · 2 days ago
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24.11.21 // last weekend i took the first part of the university entrance test. hope to achieve a great result at the second part! wish me luck 🥺😊
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starryuniversitas · 2 months ago
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— 30.8.21 ☕️ studygram
my semester starts next week and i’m terrified and excited at the same time — mostly stressed because of everything else going on in my life but also because i’m finally writing my thesis this year and it scares me; with my thesis seminar i only have two other courses: swedish and environmental & economic anthro
peep some of the pictures i’ve taken for my studygram/bookstagram 🤎 i hope you’re doing okay wherever you are
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myhoneststudyblr · 7 months ago
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my masterpost | my studygram | ask me anything
[click images for high quality]
[transcript under the cut]
Other advice posts that may be of interest:
How To Study When You Really Don’t Want To
Active Revision Techniques
How To Do Uni Readings
How to Revise BIG Subjects
Non-Stop Studying
The Problem
You find a comfortable spot to study and refuse to move ever again. You don’t even think about taking a break—that would be a waste of time and your due date is super close so you can't afford to do that
The Solution
Whether you’re doing this because you think it’s efficient or because you left everything until the last minute, you’re not going to learn much. Our brains need rest time to process information. Planning ahead is the key here. Instead of focusing only on your deadlines, work backwards and figure out when you need to start working on a project. Take into account how long each part of the work will take you. You’ll feel less overwhelmed and more able to actually learn the material, as opposed to just cramming. If you’re really in a pinch (hey, it happens to everyone), try out the pomodoro method: 25 minutes on, 5 minutes off, with a longer break every 4 circuits. It holds off exhaustion and keeps you feeling refreshed over long periods of heavy work!
Over Highlighting
The Problem
You try to study by reading the textbook, but somehow end up highlighting everything and remembering nothing.
The Solution
Turns out, passively re-reading a textbook is pretty useless. Just because you’re holding a highlighter doesn’t mean you’re actually engaging with the material. Learn how to read actively by taking notes as you read, which will force you to decide what parts of the reading are worth remembering. Come up with practice questions or make flashcards. The more of the 5 senses you use in your studying, the more likely you are to remember the information. If your exam includes an essay portion, think about what kinds of themes your professor might ask about and make some possible outlines. Even if your practice questions don’t actually show up on the exam, you’ll be in the right headspace!
Multitasking 
The Problem
You are studying at the same time that you are watching the newest show on Netflix, texting a friend about what happened last Tuesday and cooking a three-course meal.
The Solution
People are actually really bad at multitasking. While we think we’re focusing on 2 things at once, we’re actually switching between 2 tasks very rapidly, meaning that our brains never have time to fully adjust to working on either one. Unfortunately, the only way around this one is to plan ahead (weird how that keeps cropping up). Make a study schedule ahead of time and figure out which days you’ll devote to which subjects. You’ll be able to process the material more efficiently than you would if your attention was split between tasks, and ultimately you’ll have more confidence in what you’ve learned.
Solo Studying 
The Problem
You only ever study in solitude and refuse to ask anyone else for help.
The Solution
Studying on your own is fine (sometimes even preferable), but having people you can bounce ideas off of can be insanely helpful (even over Zoom!). Convince a friend or family member to let you “teach” them the material—the gaps in your understanding will become more obvious when you try to explain a topic to an uninformed party. If you have no one available, you could even teach to a pet or toy. Most importantly, take advantage of your professors or teachers and contact them if you’re confused about something. You won’t regret it.
Studying Chronologically
The Problem
You sit down to revise for an exam and you look through all of the notes from your class in chronological order.
The Solution
In addition to being a very passive study strategy, it also puts you at risk of running out of time to review the material you learnt most recently, which is often emphasised more heavily on the final exam and can also be some of the most difficult concepts to master – especially for classes like math and languages that increase in difficulty throughout the semester. You will also probably be reviewing information you already know. Instead of studying in chronological order, try studying in priority order, spending the majority of your time on the information that will be most important for you to know for the test.
Memorising, Rather Than Understanding 
The Problem
You know that you need to know facts in an exam so you study by trying to memorise all of the facts from a class, rather than truly understanding the underlying concepts. 
The Solution
Memorising can work well in some classes, especially in earlier stages of school, but it often backfires in more advanced classes. If you’ve memorised a definition but don’t really understand what it means, then as soon as the information is presented in a slightly different format, or you’re asked to apply it to a new type of problem, you will have no idea how to proceed. Rather than memorising the information from your classes, use study strategies that encourage you to understand it. Explaining ideas out loud in your own words, or teaching them to someone else, are great examples of study strategies that promote understanding.
Not Practicing How You’ll Be Tested
The Problem
You have a study method that you use for all of your exams no matter the subject or the format of the exam. 
The Solution
It’s great to have a study method that supports your revision but often they can be limited to specific skills. For example, flashcards might be a great strategy for a test that is mostly multiple-choice and matching questions, but they might be less useful for essays. If you want to be prepared for your exams, you need to make sure that the way you are studying for your test is similar to how you will actually be tested on the material. The best way to do this is by doing practice questions. Numerous studies have shown that students who test themselves on the material they are learning remember the information better than students who do not take practice tests. Practice testing also helps you avoid “illusions of competence”: situations in which you think you know the information better than you do. 
Not Using Active Revision Techniques
The Problem
You study by re-reading over your notes or perhaps rewriting them. 
The Solution
Unfortunately, this approach to studying is not very effective, in large part because it is extremely passive. Students who use this approach will readily admit that they can read over a page of notes and not remember what they have just read! If you don’t remember it right after you’ve read it, how could you possibly hope to answer questions about it on the test? Choosing more active study strategies that require you to engage with the material will enable you to learn the material more effectively and efficiently. This includes: mindmaps, flashcards, past papers, study groups, and many more.
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apricitystudies · 5 months ago
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here's a quick guide on how i proofread and edit my essays as an humanities undergrad! i tend to spend more time on research and editing and much less time on writing and my first drafts are often horrendous, so editing is really important for me :^)
i've also created guides on essay preparation, the 5-paragraph essay, how to research, and how to write essays. you can find all my other masterposts here.
transcript below:
how to proofread essays by apricitystudies
(section one: before beginning) ideally, you should finish writing your essay a few days before the due date so you can step away from it for a while. this helps you to 'forget' what you wrote and allows you to proofread with fresh eyes. after staring at the same piece of writing for so long, your brain tends to fill in the gaps itself as you read, leading you to miss mistakes.
(section two: the key to effective proofreading is to edit in rounds) each round, focus on and attempt to fix a different issue. this requires you to have a little bit more time to edit, which is why you should finish writing early.
(round one: content) argument: does your argument make sense? is it strong? is it logical? evidence: is your research robust? are your points all backed up with sufficient evidence? is every piece of evidence necessary and relevant to your argument? elaboration: is your argument well developed? is every piece of evidence explained, analysed, or critiqued? is the research you provide linked back to and used to support your argument?
(round two: flow) map: have you provided a clear and concise roadmap of your essay? linking: are your paragraphs linked? do the last sentences of each paragraph flow into the next? have you shown how your points are connected? coherence: is your argument logical? is the order of your points easy to follow? is the reader able to see the progression of your argument? TIP: put all the topic sentences of your body paragraphs into one single paragraph. do they make sense together?
(round three: language) vocabulary: have you repeated words/phrases excessively? is your paraphrasing accurate? sentence length: are your sentences overly long? can they be split up? cohesion: does your writing flow? does it sound stilted or clunky? is everything you've written clear? punctuation: are your quotation marks correct? have you used em dashes, colons, and semicolons accurately? small errors: are your spelling and grammar correct?
(round four: format) referencing: are your in-text citations/footnotes correct? is every piece of evidence referenced? style: have you used the correct font size/style? is your line spacing correct? are your paragraphs justified/indented if they're supposed to be? page setup: are your margins set up properly? are your headers/footers/ page numbers correct, if required? bibliography: are your bibliography entries correct? are they in alphabetical order? is the line spacing and indentation correct?
(section three: other tips) 1: change your font to something like comic sans. this makes your brain work harder to read and stops it from skipping words/phrases. 2: print out your essay and go over it with a red pen. mark as if you were a teacher and pick out as many mistakes as you can. 3. read it aloud or use a text-to-speech function. listening to your writing helps you to identify awkward writing and repeated words.
(ending slide: thanks for reading!) this is just my method of proofreading and it might not work for everyone. that being said, i hope it was still helpful! from @apricitystudies
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bulletnotestudies · 10 months ago
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*click for better quality* (transcript under the cut)
My other masterposts: • extensions pt.1  • study sounds • dealing with failure • how to gain traction • how to study when you’re struggling
TOUCAN Learn languages without taking any extra time for it - Toucan replaces random words on your screen with their equivalents in your target language; You can see the translation and listen to the pronunciation by hovering over them. It also works in reverse - if you highlight any phrase in your language, it can give you the target language equivalent!
OPENDYSLEXIC Open-Dyslexic is a font specifically designed to increase readability for readers with dyslexia. The extension overrides all fonts on a web page with the OpenDyslexic font, and formats pages to be more easily readable.
INFINITY NEW TAB Another new tab extension. This one opens up a dashboard that's quite customizable. You can make to do lists, check your bookmarks, etc. Its design is fairly minimalistic and features lots of HD backgrounds.
WHAT FONT This one's super nice for graphic design students or just anyone who enjoys a pretty font here and there. It helps you find the name of any font you come across while browsing the web, along with the size and hex colour code!
CUTE CURSORS This one is completely self-explanatory. It replaces your boring triangle cursor with a cuter one; You can even upload your own little image. I, a professional student, can assure you browsing academic articles is way more fun when your cursor is a watermelon wedge.
POSTUREMINDER Face it - unless you have a standing desk or a super fancy desk chair, your posture is pretty bad most of the time. If you spend hours on end studying at your desk, this will help you get better at looking after your spine! This extension sends you reminders at specified time intervals.
MERCURY READER This one is great for everyone that has to read lots of articles - it removes any unnecessary clutter (ads and such) from websites. It also allows you to change the font and its size, as well as toggle between light or dark themes.
COFFEELINGS Your own personal mini journal & mood tracker. You can use different roasts to signify different moods, and you can write journal entries as well! Also works offline. You could also use this as a productivity tracker.
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jeonchemstudy · 3 months ago
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8.1.21 | WHY IS IT AUGUST???? i feel like july was so slow but when it changed months i was like ??????? anyway i got a bunch of new stuff for my apartment shipped from home yesterday and after rearranging everything i think it looks quite nice! what do y’all think?
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learnelle · 5 months ago
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20/100 days of productivity | studying french
So.... I'm officially living in Bordeaux now, but mentally I'm still in this little bookshop we stumbled upon on one sleepy afternoon
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moonshinestudies · 4 months ago
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08.07.2021
“Know that you can start late, look different, be uncertain and still succeed.” -Misty Copeland
Library days, waking up to sunshine and sunsets after a tiring day 🌻
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academiix · 7 months ago
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100/100 – i’ve been doing 100 days of productivity for forever and i’m finally on my last post of the series ??! anyway here are some spreads & notes 
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trashracoon · a month ago
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IM BACK AT SCHOOL!!!! and it's fucking beautiful, infact that part of the city is completely full old gothic architecture and it almost makes me cry everytime I look at it.
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myhoneststudyblr · 18 days ago
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my masterpost | my studygram | ask me anything 
[click images for high quality]
[transcript under the cut]
Other advice posts that may be of interest:
All About Procrastination
How To Study When You Really Don’t Want To
Common Study Mistakes
7 Strategies to Improve Concentration
How to make your notes aesthetic
7 Ways to Power Up Your Notetaking 
THE NOTETAKING PROCESS
what to do before, during and after class
BEFORE CLASS
How should you be preparing your notes for classes or lectures?
Print out and review any lecture notes or slides if available so you can figure out the structure of the class and the main headings that will be covered
Identify main concepts and terms you expect to learn
Search up any unfamiliar terms, phrases or concepts and get definitions or one sentence explanations
Write questions you hope the class will answer 
Make note of any information that could be helpful from previous classes or readings, for example, key people, dates, formulae, definitions, etc. 
Read any set preparation material from textbooks or articles and notes down your immediate thoughts
DURING CLASS
What should you do while in class to get the best notes?
Take notes in your own words
Use consistent abbreviations and symbols 
Include notes for all aspects of the class (eg. discussions and visuals)
Answer any questions you wrote before class 
Add depth and detail to the notes you bring to class (eg. are there any specific examples that the teacher brings up for example?) 
Note new questions or areas of confusion from the lecture so you can review those concepts later
Capture main ideas and sufficient detail (definitions, examples, images)
Make connections between concepts both from within the class and from previous classes 
AFTER CLASS
Now that you have notes, what should you do with them?
Make time to return to your notes after class, at the very least to read over them 
Add clarification and explanation to any areas where you were confused and look up any questions you had (you could also ask your teacher)
Compare notes with a friend or study partner to check for any missed information
Transform your notes into a new format (e.g. mind map, quiz questions, study guide)
Create short summaries with the most important information and keep for later revision (you could even challenge yourself to a certain word limit)
Use your notes to self-test on key concepts by creating your own practice questions and mark schemes
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apricitystudies · 4 months ago
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15.07.2021 // my next semester starts in two weeks :/ my holiday just flew by and i’ve not really done much
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jeonchemstudy · a month ago
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10.17.21 | i’m fine i’m not drowning in immuno or anything 😫
🎵i am listening to: everybody has, chungha
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marie-curie · a month ago
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10.10.2021 // yesterday i had a sudden motivational boost to redocorate my room for the new semester. i reorganised my bookshelf and threw/ gave away everything i don't need anymore. and today i picked some small flowers and put them in these fancy flasks.
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