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#booklr

So I don’t know why books is trending but my bookworm self is crawling out the dirt to enjoy it!

Also I’ve been reading during lock down and would recommend you do too! I’ve read

- Harry Potter and The Order of the Phoenix

- 1776

- All the Light We Cannot See

And would recommend all of them!

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Since the timeline is only a month and I want to get a bingo in that amount of time I’m actually aiming for one (or three): namely, anything in the same line as the ‘from your tbr pile’ square since I know it’s pretty sure I will get that this month.

My first book, The Decision by K.A. Applegate (aka the 18th Animorphs book), marks off the ‘under 200 pages’ square (at 161 pages) for me and gets me 1/5 closer to my goal.

readingbooksinisrael
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My voice isn’t the one anybody needs to hear right now so: if you’re a person of color running a book or academic blog that could use some greater visibility send me your favorite posts and I’ll share them here

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QUEEN MOVE

Kennedy Ryan

PUBLICATION DETAILS

Kindle Edition, 300 pages

Published May 26th 2020 by Blue Box Press

SYNOPSIS

The boy who always felt like mine is now the man I can’t have…

Dig a little and you’ll find photos of me in the bathtub with Ezra Stern.
Get your mind out of the gutter. We were six months old.
Pry and one of us might confess we saved our first kiss for each other.
The most clumsy, wet, sloppy … spectacular thirty seconds of my adolescence.
Get into our business and you’ll see two families, closer than blood, torn apart in an instant.
Twenty years later, my “awkward duckling” best friend from childhood,
the boy no one noticed, is a man no one can ignore.

Finer. Fiercer. Smarter.
Taken.


Tell me it’s wrong.
Tell me the boy who always felt like mine is now the man I can’t have.
When we find each other again, everything stands in our way–secrets, lies, promises.
But we didn’t come this far to give up now.
And I know just the move to make if I want to make him mine.

RATING

5/5

REVIEW

He glances up from the board, his eyes tracing my face in that deliberate way of his. “The queen is the most powerful piece.”

I just read one of the best book this year! Queen Move is an amazing novel by the amazing Kennedy Ryan about Kimba Allen and Ezra Stern. Kimba and Ezra were more than just childhood best friends, they were soulmates. They were attached at the hip even before they can start talking and been together until their teenage years but then got separated because Ezra’s family had to move to a different country. Years later, they met each other again and realized that they feelings for each other remains the same and that just made things complicated.

This book indeed have extra ordinary characters. Kimba is an extra-ordinary woman. She’s smart, feisty, and intelligent and one of the strongest characters I came across with. A determined woman who is the best at her job. An amazing woman of color trying to make her own name and making history in the field of Politics.

Ezra, on the other hand is an equally amazing character as well. He’s an amazing educator, a smart, kind and selfless man who cares deeply for his family, friends and for his community.

This book has the most amazing characters, I loved how they complement each other and I also loved their improvements. The story is also perfect, there are no dull moments and it isn’t predictable. Kennedy Ryan have an amazing writing style and I love that in all her books that I’ve read.

Queen Move is not just your ordinary second-chance romance. It is a book that speaks about family, love, friendship and social issues that are relevant right now. Kennedy Ryan wrote an amazing book that will definitely inspire people, particularly women to reach for their dreams and be the best in they everything they aspire to do even it’s a field or industry being dominated by men.

I’ve read some of her books and she never disappoint me, not even once. I hope you can give this book a try and some of her books, too. I personally recommend Grip and of course, Queen Move.

Happy Reading!

Love,

JL

PS. I need to add The King Maker Duet on my reading list this month. I’ve freaking curious about it since I’ve heard that Kimba is also there.

onpagetwentyone
onpagetwentyone
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JOMP Book Photo Challenge hosted by @justonemorepage

Day 3 - LGBTQIA+ Pride

When I think about this prompt the heartstopper graphic novel series by Alice Oseman always springs to mind. They are such cute, lovely books about these two gorgeous boys just falling in love and I’d highly recommend them to anyone thinking of reading an LGBGQIA+ book 📚

image
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“Not a flat. Not an apartment in back. Not a man’s house. Not a daddy’s house. A house all my own. With my porch and my pillow, my pretty purple petunias. My books and my stories.”

- Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street

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Private Lessons by Cynthia Salaysay

My Rating: 4 stars

Many thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for the ARC! This book was published on May 12 2020 and is now available for purchase.

Private Lessons is a coming-of-age story focused on Claire, a young pianist who begins taking lessons with a prestigious teacher to up her chances of getting into a good college. As her lessons begin to take over her life, an unhealthy relationship forms between her and her teacher, Paul. This is, of course, a difficult topic to take on, but Cynthia Salaysay handles it well. Claire and Paul’s relationship grows slowly, at first seeming innocuous but then becoming more sinister. It’s upsetting to watch, but it feels incredibly real. Due to this subject matter, this book won’t be for everyone. It does include depiction of sexual assault.       

Rather than being plot-driven, this book centers on Claire’s emotional journey. There aren’t many major plot events and the pacing is fairly slow. I think this worked really well for the story, but some people may not like it. It takes quite a while for Claire and Paul’s relationship to even come to a head, and that’s the main focus of the summary. But Claire’s emotional state and the daily events of her life are an important part of what makes her vulnerable to Paul. She is dealing with the death of her father, a strained relationship with her father, friendship problems, boy problems, and issues related to race and class. The slow progression of all of these is important for her coming-of-age arc.

I found Claire to be a great character. She feels very much like a real teenager. She’s insecure and often unlikable. She’s a jerk sometimes, especially to her mother. But I completely understood where she was coming from because I’ve been there. Again, some people may not like this and think she’s grating, but I love finding teen characters who feel like actual teenagers.

This book also has some great representation because Claire is Filipino-American. This is a culture that I don’t think I’ve ever read about, so I found it very interesting. Claire’s mother is an immigrant from the Philippines, as are many of the women we see at her prayer group. The book gives a great glimpse into both Filipino and immigrant culture and the struggles they encounter. We see them mixing English and Tagalog. We hear about Claire’s elementary school teacher telling her parents not to teach her Tagalog because it will confuse her. We see Claire encounter racism several times. I’m also pretty sure Salaysay is Filipino-American, so this is an own voices book. 

Overall this is an incredibly real and relevant coming-of-age story for our current world, and it’s definitely worth checking out!  

aliteraryprincess
aliteraryprincess
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