Tumgir
#learning
swayaminfotech · 2 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
It's funny when this type of file name already exists.
114 notes · View notes
haleyincarnate · a day ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Quote by Sophia Joan Short
143 notes · View notes
hiimbit · a day ago
Text
why do i read so much? oh, i just like reading! (i want to be the smartest mf in any room)
109 notes · View notes
sweetchotimochi · a day ago
Text
tips for acing chem ʕ•́ᴥ•̀ʔっ
(disclaimer: this worked for me. It may not work for you, and that’s okay! Keep trying, you can do it!)
Continuous exposure to chemistry: One of the biggest things that helped me in chemistry was the continuous exposure I had beforehand. I had plenty of books that I read about chemistry, watched documentaries, had an interactive book about all the elements, e.t.c. Continuous exposure allows you to retain a lot more information beforehand, and it is different from studying. Studying is BORING, continuous exposure and learning IS NOT. Allow yourself to have fun while learning chem!
Watch videos about things you don’t understand and apply them yourself: The most challenging thing in chemistry was probably equations. You should probably watch videos to learn this. There are tons of videos out on YouTube, Khan Academy and more. Not only should you watch these videos but try to follow along and apply them into questions. If, like Khan Academy, there are ways you can do a little quiz or test yourself, be sure to do that! It helps a lot.
Ask for help from peers: This, 100%, is a great way to learn. If I was feeling sluggish or tired, I would ask for help from peers, and write down what they said. I would also take pictures of their notes and learn from that as well, later on. It helps a lot to learn from someone just like you, so you can understand better.
Active studying: I think this is a very common tip, but it is so important!! You may have a textbook or something to follow on in classes, so here’s what to do: read the textbook chapters and summarize them in your own way. It helps so much. Writing about each section or chapter allows you to take that information, and write it in a different way while still having the most important parts. DO NOT highlight or read. That is passive studying, and trust me, it does not help. Write down, summarize, do a mind map but do NOT highlight or read. It’s okay to do that for help but it really isn’t the best way to handle a concept and info-heavy class like chemistry.
Interactive, do-it-yourself studying: I heard a lot of classes just have a teacher who drones on and on and most students just have to write the stuff down, a test about every 2 weeks and move on. That is a terrible way to learn. If you are not doing well on tests or anything, this is probably why. This is a chance to use other resources for interactive learning, like videos. Something I used to do was watch experiments on YouTube, which helped me a LOT to learn about chemistry, chemical experiments and more. If you have online resources which help in interactive learning, go ahead and do that. I would not pay attention in my physics class because this is what the class was like, but I would go back home and write everything I remembered, and learn from the web.
Revision tips: I think a great way to learn is to start from a blank page. Use that blank page to start writing everything you know about a topic, formulas, diagrams, e.t.c. Why is this such an effective studying style? Because in a test, you have a blank page. You don't have mind maps, your pretty studying notes or anything else. This helps you in tests so much because then you are skilled in pouring all that information onto the blank test page. After you finish, go ahead and look back on your notes: What are you missing? What doesn’t make sense? Now you can focus on what you don’t know, are confused about, and start honing on those spots.
Learn from tests: As soon as you get your test back, let's say you get a C. Instead of staring in shock, LOOK at the test. What did the teacher mark? What notes did they write? You can write short notes on a sticky note, and problems that you didn’t understand. Then, go back to your notes and figure out why you got that question wrong. Is it because you didn’t focus on this topic much? Silly mistake? Go ahead and write the answer and try the question again on a separate piece of paper. After that, go back and strengthen those spots so you don’t make that mistake again.
If you have other problems, like not being able to study for chem long, mind being somewhere far away, chemistry is boring.. Those are not chemistry problems, those are probably study problems. There are many tips out there on the web made by awesome, amazing people that can help you better. If you are truly struggling, maybe it's best to stop and think about the course as a whole. Ask for help. And remember, these tips helped me, but they may not work for you. And that is absolutely okay. Your worth is not determined by your grades.
31 notes · View notes
sleepy-bebby · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
45K notes · View notes
deathtoskinnyjeans · 10 months ago
Text
A Twitter Thread from David Bowles:
[Text transcript at the end of the screenshots]
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
I'll let you in on a secret. I have a doctorate in education, but the field’s basically just a 100 years old. We don’t really know what we’re doing. Our scholarly understanding of how learning happens is like astronomy 2000 years ago.
Most classroom practice is astrology.
Before the late 19th century, no human society had ever attempted to formally educate the entire populace. It was either aristocracy, meritocracy, or a blend. And always male.
We’re still smack-dab in the middle of the largest experiment on children ever done.
Most teachers perpetuate the “banking” model (Freire) used on them by their teachers, who likewise inherited it from theirs, etc.
Thus the elite “Lyceum” style of instruction continues even though it’s ineffectual with most kids.
What’s worse, the key strategies we’ve discovered, driven by cognitive science & child psychology, are quite regularly dismissed by pencil-pushing, test-driven administrators. Much like Trump ignores science, the majority of principals & superintendents I’ve known flout research.
Some definitions:
Banking model --> kids are like piggy banks: empty till you fill them with knowledge that you're the expert in.
Lyceum --> originally Aristotle's school, where the sons of land-owning citizens learned through lectures and research.
Things we (scholars) DO know:
-Homework doesn't really help, especially younger kids.
-Students don't learn a thing from testing. Most teachers don't either (it's supposed to help them tweak instruction, but that rarely happens).
-Spending too much time on weak subjects HURTS.
Do you want kids to learn? Here's something we've discovered: kids learn things that matter to them, either because the knowledge and skills are "cool," or because .... they give the kids tools to liberate themselves and their communities.
Maintaining the status quo? Nope.
Kids are acutely aware of injustice and by nature rebellious against the systems of authority that keep autonomy away from them.
If you're perpetuating those systems, teachers, you've already freaking lost.
They won't be learning much from you. Except what not to become. Sure, you can wear them down. That's what happened to most of you, isn't it? You saw the hideous flaw in the world and wanted to heal it. But year after numbing year, they made you learn their dogma by rote.
And now many of you are breaking the souls of children, too.
For what?
It's all smoke and mirrors. All the carefully crafted objectives, units and exams.
WE. DON'T. KNOW. HOW. PEOPLE. LEARN.
We barely understand the physical mechanisms behind MEMORY. But we DO know kids aren't empty piggy banks. They are BRIMMING with thought.
The last and most disgusting reality? The thing I hear in classroom after freaking classroom?
Education is all about capitalism.
"You need to learn these skills to get a good job." To be a good laborer. To help the wealthy generate more wealth, while you get scraps.
THAT is why modern education is a failure.
Its basic premise is monstrous.
"Why should I learn to read, Dr. Bowles?"
Because reading is magical. It makes life worth living. And being able to read, you can decode the strategies of your oppressors & stop them w/ their own words.
67K notes · View notes
happyheidi · 7 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
9K notes · View notes
euphorictruths · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
I'm Learning How To Love Myself- Gursahil Sohal (soulosaint)
4K notes · View notes
a-queer-seminarian · 12 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
ID: a tweet by _grimm @ExileGrimm reading, What's the dumbest beliefs you had as a child?
When I was 4-5 I swore that bird seeds grew birds, thus the name. When my parents asked me to prove it to them, I planted a pile of bird seeds.
The next day there were loads of birds where I planted the seeds, showing I was right.”
A second tweet reads, “I wondered why my parents still objected to this idea after I proved it worked, so I thought they were hiding this secret from me because they were worried I'd grow a massive flock of birds and they'd not be able to tell me what to do.” / end id
Link to original tweet
19K notes · View notes
pratchettquotes · a month ago
Text
"Now, this is a soldier's song, see? You don't look like soldiers but by the gods I'll see you sounds like 'em! You'll pick it up as we goes along! Right turn! March! 'All the little angels rise up, rise up, all the little angels rise up high!' Sing it, you sons of mothers!"
The marchers picked up the response from those who knew it.
"How do they rise up, rise up, rise up, how do they rise up, rise up high? They rise heads up, heads up, heads up--" sang out Dickens as they turned the corner.
Vimes listened as the refrain died away.
"That's a nice song," said young Sam, and Vimes realized that he was hearing it for the first time.
"It's an old soldier's song," he said.
"Really, Sarge? But it's about angels."
Yes, thought Vimes, and it's amazing what bits those angels cause to rise up as the song progresses. It's a real soldiers' song: sentimental, with dirty bits.
"As I recall, they used to sing it after battles," he said. "I've seen old men cry when they sing it," he added.
"Why? It sounds cheerful."
They were remembering who they were not singing it with, thought Vimes. You'll learn. I know you will.
Terry Pratchett, Night Watch
1K notes · View notes
chaucers · 9 months ago
Text
i think we need to remember that learning isn't always 'aesthetic'. learning is sometimes so hard that you want to quit (and sometimes you do); learning can leave you drained of all of your energy; learning has its highs, but its lows as well, and not understanding something straight away can make you feel like a failure; learning is notes that you can understand, regardless of whether or not anyone else can; learning is for yourself, and yourself only.
5K notes · View notes
haleyincarnate · 2 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Quote by T. Haidar
4K notes · View notes
noodledesk · 2 months ago
Text
big masterpost of fun things to do this summer
hi :) i like to make a big list of things i want to do each summer, and i thought i'd share all the resources i collected this year with y'all in case you want to do any of these things too <3
learn a new language. 🦜
i've collected a bunch of resources for french, korean, and mandarin so i'll be making separate posts for those languages. but here's some of my favourite resources - most of them are based off of krashen’s comprehensible input theory which is why they are fun resources:
french: free grammar lessons and quizzes for all levels, watch french tv, read manga in french, a drive full of french books, a bunch of french culture podcasts, a list of french youtubers
korean: anki grammar decks for all levels, super in depth grammar explanations up to advanced level, a bunch of resources, reddit’s ultimate beginner’s thread, read korean webtoon, talk to me in korean
mandarin: a bunch of anki decks, grammar gamified, reading practice, chinese reading world, mandarin bean grammar points
japanese: core 2000 words anki deck, grammar gamified on renshuu
spanish: language transfer for spanish!
learn to draw. 🎨
this is more just a collection of art related resources. hope they help!
proko’s art library, a bunch of sketching and fundamental tutorials
the complete famous artists course
collection of art books and resources
alphonso dunn’s youtube channel
learn guitar. 🎸
i got a guitar last summer on a whim and have been having a really fun time learning it! here’s the main resource i’ve been using.
learn jazz piano. 🎹
similarly jazz piano is something i’ve wanted to get into for a while + improv. this person’s youtube channel is very cool!
write something and put it out into the world! ✍
i love to write and it took me a while to learn how to submit stuff to journals. hope these help you!
a bunch of resources on how to submit to journals
how to submit to literary magazines by doretta lau
publishing 101
chillsubs, an easy way to find journals to submit to
make your own video games. 🎮
by now if you follow me you know i love to make twine games. here are a couple of cool engines you can use for free!
twine, a text based engine
love
renpy or visual novel resources
bitsy
take a free online course. 🧠
coursera has a lot of options, which i really like. i took Yale’s the science of well being a few years ago and it was great!
make your own music or learn how audio software works. 🎵
audionodes is a cool free browser software that lets you do this without downloading anything!
learn about personal finance. 💵
i feel like it’s hard to devote proper time to learning about personal finance so a lot of us rely on learning as we go, but there are some good resources and tools online that are quick and easy when you have 5-30 min to spare!
PBS Two Cents youtube short vids about personal finance
wealthsimple personal finance 101 (short videos. nicholas braun is in them for some reason)
mint - free budgeting and goals software
edspira - more technical side of finance, accounting, etc youtube channel
1K notes · View notes
unistrugglin · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Throwback to first weeks of uni and reading about the ancient philosophy in the library. 2nd throwback to trip to Budapest a few weeks ago. Feeling so grateful today ✨
3K notes · View notes
lousydrawingsforgoodpeople · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
1K notes · View notes
carpenter-synth · 5 months ago
Text
-public libraries are free. I find that this isn't as widely known a fact as it absolutely should be, and it seems sinister that this isn't explained in schools. (fight privatization. Yes, I'm posting this because, this morning, I ran into someone who thought they were a subscription service. oh, and DVDs might have a fee. sometimes)
-you can usually sign up for an account at one with little work
-There's a lot of stuff in print that isn't always easily accessible online (and they tend to have manga!)
-The downtown/main branch will probably have the most interesting/oldest stuff, and if you're not really digging your local branch, try that one
-The library might be able to swing you a free eBook service account or even a streaming video service with some decent things on it
-Libraries provide a lot of services to people who can't afford some resources (fight privatization.)
-Even if you don't think they'll have something for your particular interest, you'd be surprised what they do have-- and you don't know what you don't know.
A lot more important and valuable stuff that you should read, since mostly my original is the one getting reblogged: https://cyanide-latte.tumblr.com/post/673002651285422080/
also: this post sorely lacks resources for areas that do not have a local library or only small, non-funded ones that lack the resources that a county library might have. Need to remedy.
2K notes · View notes
joytri · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Mondays
976 notes · View notes
Text
Okay, I don't usually make these kinds of posts, but I wanted to share a little trick I discovered recently.
Have something you'd really like to learn how to do, but no matter how you try those youtube videos just don't make sense? And you don't want to spend $50 on a book full of terms that'll just go straight over your head?
Try looking for a book on the topic written for kids!
Hear me out! I've been wanting to learn how to code for a while now, just because it looks like it would be very useful and I love finding new ways to make stuff. But all the books I'd look at were too advanced and the price tag too high for me to justify buying if I didn't know for sure I was going to read it. All the 'beginners' videos online weren't actually for beginners. They didn't tell me what all those terms meant, they just assumed I'd know already.
And then one night a little light bulb went off. If I wanted someone to explain to me how this was done in the simplest way possible, then I should be looking for something that's geared towards kids/teens. No one is going to expect them to know what 'html' means and how it works.
And sure enough, I found a book that worked perfectly! I've learned a lot from it and I've had a blast as well! And it was a fraction of the price of the books I'd been looking at before.
So yeah, I just wanted to share this because it helped me out a lot. Hope it helps a few of you.
815 notes · View notes
bluebyrd-screaming · 5 months ago
Text
Listen, no one is too old to learn a new skill. No one. The amount of little old ladies that come into the yarn shop I work at and say "can you help me figure out this pattern" or "do you all offer lessons" or "I've just started to learn how to crochet/knit. Can you help?: is amazing. And they sit down and pick up new skills and practice and make mistakes and they *learn*
You are never too old to learn
2K notes · View notes
blunt-science · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Dogor is the 18,000 year old pup that was found within the Siberian Permafrost, yet is not quite a dog nor a wolf, but a puzzling connection to both. 
Dogor has been miraculously preserved within the permafrost, with its fur, teeth and even whiskers incredibly intact. Radiocarbon dating has placed the animal at 18,000 years old and researchers have suggested that the animal passed away at just 2 months old. The name Dogor means “Friend” in Yakut, a language spoken within Eastern Siberia. 
Generally, genetic analysis can quite easily discern whether a discovered canine is a wolf or dog, but in this instance, the genetics suggest that it could be an ancestral link to both. Interestingly, Dogor lived at a time in canine evolutionary history when dogs and wolves began to branch off from each other.The general scientific consensus is that dogs and wolves split from a common ancestor, however, the process of how “dogs became dogs” is certainly contested, and Dogor could be a crucial piece in that puzzle.
If Dogor is determined to be a dog, it will be the oldest ever discovered. The next oldest, the Bonn-Oberkassel puppy, was discovered in Germany and was clearly determined to be a dog of around 14,000 years old, buried with a man and a woman. 
The progression of climate change is melting the permafrost more rapidly, and discoveries like these are becoming more and more commonplace.
Images via Sergey Fedorov/The Siberian Times
27K notes · View notes